The Myth of Band of Brothers

adam517
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Joined: 27 Jun 2010, 10:05

13 Feb 2013, 13:17 #11

Incredibly well put.



Adam
Ignorance means life is lost.
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Conway396
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Joined: 21 Aug 2013, 16:36

21 Aug 2013, 21:31 #12

If you read "Battling Buzzards" by Gerald Astor you might find that Ambrose's BOB is strikingly similar! It was published in 1993 I believe.
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1196copper
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Joined: 15 Sep 2012, 20:58

24 Aug 2013, 23:28 #13

I like Jim Martin's view on the BoB "controversy":

"I want to comment on what I consider to be a minor controversy. (Those of you who know me from local politics know that I have never shied away from speaking forthrightly.)

Some have said that HBO's "Band of Brothers" series gave too much credit to only E Company in our 506th PIR.

As far as I am concerned this TV mini-series shined a very bright light on ALL of us. In the years since it's original airing in 2001 BOB has proven to be a primary catalyst for the raising of the public consciousness on not only our 101st Airborne unit but on the entire WWII generation. I do not begrudge the E Co. guys getting their due attention. They have done much in the intervening years to further our legacy.

We all fought the war together and I am happy for us to be recognized in our later lives as has happened. It is gratifying to see the increased level of awareness about WWII in the general public. The "Band of Brothers" series deserves a great amount of credit for this.

Jim "Pee Wee" Martin - A "Toccoa Original"
(G Company / 506th PIR /101st Airborne Division 1942-1945)
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jclarkrn
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Joined: 28 Jan 2011, 02:35

08 Jan 2014, 03:16 #14

Yes. In Agreement, I Thank You. john e. clark, rn, bishop, ca  Direct Great-Nephew of PFC Ray Eugene Sanders, 101/502/3rd/Co. H. KIA 6/8/44, Houesville.  Uncle was 20 years young. Another point: It bugs me when folks state the most-published photo of Eisenhower with the Troops is "Easy Company". Sure, they were there, and a few identified. Yet the first time my Mother saw that photo in late 2007 in Time Magazine, She came to me white as a sheet & crying, and stated "That is Uncle Ray". If one views that photo with Uncle's 511th Co. B Roster photo from McCall 1943, well, you be the judge. Not a single person who served; in whatever capacity, should be forgotten. We would not be having any of our discussions without the sacrifice of each and every one of them. They Are Us.  jc
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mpq1969
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Joined: 04 May 2014, 00:36

04 May 2014, 00:36 #15

I can appreciate all the comments here regarding B.O.B. but one thing many people don't realize is that most of us don't have the time for the extensive research that folks like Mark Bando put in.  Doing so is a full time job and most of us leave it to the experts like Mark and we whole heartedly thank him for the extensive knowledge he shares. 
That being said what we do know is through books and movies so we tend to gravitate towards those story lines.  The success of B.O.B. brings many of us into the so called "fold" of WWII buffs.  The book was extremely easy to read and follow (which I cannot say is true about many WWII books, and I've read MANY) and the movie easy to watch.  Had I not read B.O.B. first I probably would not have ready the many books related to all things WWII that followed.  I was actually into early American history and Revolutionary War history until reading B.O.B.
I consider myself a "fan" of the book and mini-series and feel grateful for having met a couple of the men themselves.  But I certainly don't feel I am seeking any type of glory or recognition in that pursuit.  I have been fortunate to visit Normandy on two occassions, one being just last week, and have been witness to the locations of not only Easy Co. sites but also others such as Pt. du Hoc, Gold, Juno, and Sword beaches, Omaha and Utah beaches, Col. Coles bayonet charge location, and others.
The success of B.O.B. brings people like me into the family of those who learn to appreciate the Greatest Generation because we were exposed to their stories. 
I make no apologies for admiring the men of Easy Co. because it is through B.O.B. that I know their stories.  And it is what we know that we honor and admire.  The more books I read the more men I come to know and the more I come to recognize their contribution and sacrifice.  
But it began with B.O.B.  So if there is anything to take away from this it is that it introduced me to the "rest" of WWII history.  And I am grateful to Ambrose for that.

 
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adam517
Registered User
Joined: 27 Jun 2010, 10:05

09 May 2014, 13:18 #16

I don't think anyone has ever questioned the value of Band Of Brothers to bringing a younger generation into the "hobby" of Military History (Myself included), as this is something that needs to be achieved in order to keep the memory of those who fought alive. The problem is that there are many who believe BoB is the be all and end all of WWII, believe it's inaccuracies, and take neither the time nor have the interest to find out the truth for themselves. Whilst I understand not all have the time, there are a lot that do and still don't bother to ensure that they know the facts.

Like I say though, it's value is massive.
Ignorance means life is lost.
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iain b
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Joined: 13 Dec 2007, 17:38

13 May 2014, 15:02 #17

I'm generally with you on this one Adam.  If a hundred people watch B o B and ninety of them do it to fill time as they could watching 'friends' or the football, nine take it as being the be the all encompassing gospel and just one has their appetite sufficiently spiked to go deeper then irritating as the wrongly informed can sometimes be, it has to be worth it to capture that 1.
Hopefully then that 1 has the privilege to experience Burgett, Bando, TT etc and  the reservoir of knowledge and detail we have all enjoyed over the years.

Janet and I are taking a mixed group of friends to Normandy in a few weeks. All (sadly) like me of a more mature age with an interest in history but a modest amount of knowledge on the area.  I've lent them books but also told them to watch B o B (1,2,3) and at least the first hour of SPR. Longest Day too (which most of them have seen) but due to it being made when it was, simply does not quite provide the same on screen raw realistic representation of what those men had to experience.

Days one and two will be  the more obvious places (Pegasus, Gold, Omaha, Merville, Allied Cemeteries) but day 3 we have Woody in the US airborne sector (Can't wait!!).  I think that B o B and SPR make for a good point of reference.  Not just the facts they got right but also the none historically correct bits or parts that allude to another place/specific situation/story which are woven into the script and where one can refer to it but then describe what really happened.

It won't be anything like the focused tours described here on TT perhaps two thirds history and one third enjoying the region Bayeux tapestry, wine, TC style patiseries etc. But, if it gets some or all of them wanting to explore more and leads to a few book sales for our webmaster and TT friends then it will have been a worthwhile exercise.

Hope your well Adam and weren't hurting too much (I know you are really a DCFC fan anyway and I hope you win your play off final!) on Sunday when Manchester turned back to a glorious sky blue!! Like that song the dark side used to sing ' look on the bright side' as it could have been worse as the trophy was nearly heading down the East Lancs Road. I have some dear friends who through no fault of their own were born scousers.  Hard to bear when they lose but even worse when they win!!

ATB,

Iain
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SymmMcCord
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Joined: 29 Aug 2017, 17:58

12 Oct 2017, 20:38 #18

Another "myth" is that the BOB was the first unit to get to the Berghof. I recently researched the 502nd PIR from the 101st and found that was not so and presented it in an historical fiction novel...The Deuce (the five-o-deuce).
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