Phillip Russell - Ravenoville

currahee506
Registered User
Joined: 27 Nov 2007, 08:55

30 Jan 2013, 02:02 #21

Thanks Mr. Russell.  Your comments made my day.  Joe did have the fastest time running Currahee in the 506th.
Would be an honor to meet you one day sir.
Currahee!
Rich
The point I was trying to make is that you have to be prepared to give to the people you lead. You must give in every way. You must give of your time, and you must be consistent in your treatment of them. You must never take from people you lead. Later, at Brécourt Manor, Compton did a fantastic job leading his men.

     
Reply

Jirkal
Registered User
Joined: 09 Jul 2010, 02:43

30 Jan 2013, 07:51 #22

I am very glad this post is receiving attention again to remember those who were there. Even happier makes me that Mr. Russell is still among us and aware of all the actions history buffs, like us, are doing. Currently I am in the US travelling from WI to MN very often visiting my girlfriend and doing some good WW2 research with some contacts here, what a wonderful oportunity, since I'm Chilean and going back to study to Chile pretty soon again. It is always satisfying and rewarding when your research helps to reveal lost history and to discover new one.
Greetings, Felipe Jirkal.
Reply

currahee506
Registered User
Joined: 27 Nov 2007, 08:55

30 Jan 2013, 14:15 #23

Mr. Russell:
I vividly recall Joe Reed talking about his runs up and down Currahee. He laughed about the time Ron Speirs was chasing him down the mountain - trying, without success I might add, to catch and pass him. Joe noted that after crossing the finish line (in 1st place and with a regimental best time), Speirs finally crossed, bent over, put his hands on his knees, and as Joe said, "puked his innards out." I can still see the twinkle in Joe's eye when he told that story. I sure miss him.
Rich
Last edited by currahee506 on 31 Jan 2013, 14:35, edited 2 times in total.
The point I was trying to make is that you have to be prepared to give to the people you lead. You must give in every way. You must give of your time, and you must be consistent in your treatment of them. You must never take from people you lead. Later, at Brécourt Manor, Compton did a fantastic job leading his men.

     
Reply

adam517
Registered User
Joined: 27 Jun 2010, 10:05

30 Jan 2013, 15:45 #24

THIS is what this forums all about, not the political stuff. We have a D-Day veteran in our midst, chatting to us, and are hearing stories about men many of us regard as legends and heroes beyond what any sport or movie star will ever be.



Adam
Ignorance means life is lost.
Reply

currahee506
Registered User
Joined: 27 Nov 2007, 08:55

30 Jan 2013, 17:50 #25

Mr. Russell.  Thought you might like to see some quotes from Mr. Hassenzahl recalling his time in the service.  This came from a Toledo, Ohio WWII Veterans Project.
Respect.
Rich

We went to a staging area…on the day before D-Day (June 5). That day holds a special memory for me. That afternoon we were called to assemble, and General Eisenhower-Ike, and Winston Churchill, and a party of senior officers came to our staging area to inspect the troops. I just happened to be in one of the ranks. Ike came down our rank and paused right in front of me. He looked right at me and he winked! He said, ‘Good luck, soldier.’ I will never forget that. --Albert Hassenzahl

A curious thing happened that I’ll never forget. I was lying on the beach on the stretcher. A storm came up, and the wind blew my blanker off of me, and I didn’t have the strength to pull it back up over me. An arm came across my body and tucked the blanket up tenderly around me. The person who did it was a Kraut prisoner. We just looked at each other, and I tried to thank him with my eyes, and I think he tried to say you’re welcome with his. That incident has stayed with me all these years. --Albert Hassenzahl

These two kids were manning a bazooka in a ditch. We had all kinds of fire and shells coming in. I was standing in a doorway, and all of a sudden the strangest feeling came over me. I had to get those boys out of that ditch. I yelled over to them, and the instant they got over to me a shell hit right where they had been, and it left a pretty big crater. They looked at each other, and then up at me. I’ll never forget the look on their faces. --Albert Hassenzahl

I remember laying on a stretcher, and our Regimental Chaplain, Father Maloney, come up to start the last rights on me. I told him, ‘Get lost Goddammit! I’m not gonna die! Leave me alone!’ He gave me a grin and left. Every time I saw him after that he would remind me about what had happened; he never let me forget it. --Albert Hassenzahl
The point I was trying to make is that you have to be prepared to give to the people you lead. You must give in every way. You must give of your time, and you must be consistent in your treatment of them. You must never take from people you lead. Later, at Brécourt Manor, Compton did a fantastic job leading his men.

     
Reply

philrussell
Registered User
Joined: 29 Jan 2013, 15:26

31 Jan 2013, 16:52 #26

Rich, good to hear it made your day.  How did you know Joe Reed?
Phil
Reply

philrussell
Registered User
Joined: 29 Jan 2013, 15:26

31 Jan 2013, 17:31 #27

Rich,
We were at  Operation Market Garden and being attacked by the Germans.  Al came walking along and stopped and stared at me very seriously like he was angry with me.  I thought perhaps I wasn't in the right position so I said, "Where do you want me, Captain?"  Al replied, "Stay right where you are." And he walked away.  All those years I couldn't figure out why he was angry with me. 
Years later, at a reunion, Al came up to me and said, "Hey, Russ.  One time in Holland, we were in a pitch battle with the Germans and at the time, I was afraid the Germans were going to beat us and was very worried.  I walked up to your position and you looked at me and gave me a big smile.  I felt better after that.  No matter how bad things got, you always had a smile and it always made me feel better."  Then I replied, "See,  it paid off having the Village idiot in your platoon!"  Al laughed and after all these years, I got my answer!
Phil
Reply

currahee506
Registered User
Joined: 27 Nov 2007, 08:55

31 Jan 2013, 19:03 #28

What a great response to get from Al after all of those years.
In regards to Joe Reed, I came across his name on the web while doing some research.  Mark Bando knew of him very well too.  I placed a call to meet with him, which we did, for breakfast near his home.  We became fast friends.
I so enjoyed my visits to his home in Youngstown.  Even better, I introduced him to a buddy of mine who lived on the other side of Youngstown - John, who served in 3/506 HQ.  They became good friends.  Joe would visit John often, even would take him out to spaghetti dinners, and sneak donuts over to his house.  Two Currahees who lived 15 minutes apart for most of their lives and never knew it until I introduced them.  Such an honor to have been able to make the connection.
I truly believe their friendship contributed to quite a bit of happiness in their later years. 
Thanks so much for sharing your stories.  Just fantastic.
Respectfully,
Rich
The point I was trying to make is that you have to be prepared to give to the people you lead. You must give in every way. You must give of your time, and you must be consistent in your treatment of them. You must never take from people you lead. Later, at Brécourt Manor, Compton did a fantastic job leading his men.

     
Reply

philrussell
Registered User
Joined: 29 Jan 2013, 15:26

31 Jan 2013, 21:30 #29

Rich, do you know if John from 506 HQ ever attended any of the C company reunions with Joe and Cass?  I almost remember a story about sneaking donuts to a person who was NOT supposed to be eating donuts.  Amazing about being so close in proximity all those years and being unaware of it!
Phil
Reply

philrussell
Registered User
Joined: 29 Jan 2013, 15:26

31 Jan 2013, 21:34 #30

BTW, Mac Hall was our barber and cut everyone's hair.  

Phil
Reply