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When Twenty-Six Thousand Stinkbugs Invade Your Home

When Twenty-Six Thousand Stinkbugs Invade Your Home

The Whether Man
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The Whether Man
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Joined: August 8th, 2006, 11:28 pm

March 8th, 2018, 5:53 am #1



The brown marmorated stinkbug has made a name for itself by simultaneously threatening millions of acres of American farmland and grossing out the occupants of millions of American homes.

The species is not native to this country, but in the years since it arrived it has spread to forty-three of the forty-eight continental United States, and—in patchwork, unpredictable, time-staggered ways—has overrun homes, gardens, and farms in one location after another.

The saga of how it got here, what it’s doing here, and what we’re doing about it is part dystopic and part tragicomic, part qualified success story and part cautionary tale. If you have never met its main character, you will soon. FULL STORY
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Skookum
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Skookum
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Joined: April 30th, 2006, 4:17 am

March 8th, 2018, 7:28 pm #2

No wonder I don't care for cilantro! This is a fascinating/horrifying article and the artwork is great.....makes that stinkbug look like something you want hanging on your wall.



Listening to the audio, it's really good. As if we didn't have enough to worry about.
RIP Zetaboards
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Skookum
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Skookum
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March 10th, 2018, 7:22 pm #3

Stink bug season begins: Here's how to get rid of them
March 7th 2018

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WZTV) - While March welcomes blooming flowers, warmer temperatures and the official start to spring, it also marks the beginning of the stink bug season.

According to Orkin, "Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs," often referred to as simply "stink bugs," are the most active from March to September. The peak season is during fall months.
Stink bugs have been causing a nuisance in Tennessee since 2008, according to Tennessee State University.

Stink bugs usually feed on fruits, buds and pods; however, the bugs will also feed on the sap of trees and other plants, which TSU said pierces the stems and bark and causes a potential for disease transmission.
When coming in contact with a stink bug, people should always wear gloves, as TSU says stink bug chemical secretion can irritate skin or eyes.
How to get rid of stink bugs:
For home invasion issues, ensure all windows, doors, ducts and attic overhangs are sealed to prevent entry.

Pyrethroid pesticides labeled for structural use may aid in outdoor control.

Bugs can be vacuumed into a shop vac filled with soapy water and discarded.

Sweep, don't squish: If stink bugs have found their way into your home, sweep them with a broom and dustpan. Do not squish stink bugs -- the glands between their legs omit an odor when smashed.
While the most active season for stink bugs goes through fall, stink bugs can find their way into your homes in the winter months. The bugs spend this time hiding inside walls or attic crawl spaces. They can also fly around rooms or crawl on walls and ceilings.
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RIP Zetaboards
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michelle
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michelle
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Joined: September 8th, 2012, 8:09 am

March 13th, 2018, 3:17 am #4

Skookum wrote: No wonder I don't care for cilantro! This is a fascinating/horrifying article and the artwork is great.....makes that stinkbug look like something you want hanging on your wall.



Listening to the audio, it's really good. As if we didn't have enough to worry about.
There’s actually a genetic thing that causes cilantro aversion in some people, I have it, cilantro tastes like soap to me. I was pretty geeked when Taco Bell came out with their “bowls” years ago, they were supposed to have been created by some famous chef, and I thought great, a healthy alternative to tacos and burritos...until my first bite ugh, full of cilantro.

I have the occasional stinkbug, but I’ve had a total invasion of box elder bugs this winter, I can’t figure out where they’re coming from! I usually just pick them up and put them outside, because they’re harmless, but when its 10 degrees that seems cruel, so it’s been “sorry, bug,”...and off to bug heaven...the cats try to play with them and it doesn’t end well for the bug, they’re pretty fragile
michelle wrote:

"You've eaten a lot worse things in your life than the dirt off a mushroom." - Jeff Smith
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Skookum
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Skookum
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Joined: April 30th, 2006, 4:17 am

March 13th, 2018, 3:38 am #5

Well that's interesting about the "official" cilantro aversion; yeah, it has become so popular & I just can't stand it.

Boxelder bugs do sound relatively harmless......
wrote:Boxelder bugs overwinter in plant debris or protected human-inhabited places and other suitable structures.
.....the cats are good for keeping down the overwintering house-spider population around here.

That massive indoor stink bug invasion sounds hideous to deal with!
RIP Zetaboards
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