Wood turning lathes

Discussion of all machine work. Lathing, Drilling, etc.

Wood turning lathes

egon
Advanced Member
egon
Advanced Member
Joined: 29 Jul 2005, 11:22

17 Dec 2008, 12:34 #1

Some years ago I purchased a very inexpensive wood turning mini lathe. Length of 12 inches and diameter of six inches are the maximum. Needless to say my clumsy hands soon resulted in the breaking of the tool rest. A trip to the local welding shop fixed me up with several replacement rests at very excellent prices. They seem to work well and are far stronger than the original cast ??? China ??? metal.

Now it has come to pass that I joined a Canahoidian Woodworker forum where on a fellow had broken his tool rest and was looking for a replacement. Naturally I suggested a welded up new tool rest made from steel.

Now I find that shape and strength of the rest's has evolved over the ages and they are much more complicated than outward appearances would suggest.

I am hopping someone here has familiarity with tool rests, their origins and evolution of shape cause I sure don't and feel rather challenged! :D

By the way I turned another mallet the other day from semi green wood. I found that by placing it one the mallet thick end in a few mm of mineral oil checking was eliminated and the mallet soaked up lots of oil and actually got noticeably heavier. :D :o
Egon

Old skin bag full of bones
Reply
Like

JT Metalworks
Advanced Member
JT Metalworks
Advanced Member
Joined: 28 Jan 2006, 22:18

17 Dec 2008, 12:58 #2

We need photos Egon.

The last time I used a wood lathe, it was a horrid shop smith (my dad's) and that hasn't been updated in 25 years since it came home.

The only freehand tool rests I'm aware of that differ from a traditional "bar" are those used on metal spinning lathes (they have holes for pegs to allow additional leverage). Other than being at the correct height for the tool being used, how much can you improve upon one that doesn't flex?
Reply
Like

Franz©
Advanced Member
Franz©
Advanced Member
Joined: 23 Jul 2005, 17:54

17 Dec 2008, 17:59 #3

Just what's wrong with Shopsmiths JT?

The one I have is over 50 years old and it still functions.

Egon, the only toolrest I've ever seen for a wood lathe was just an adjustable bar. I've seen a fancy duplicating device that rides on a flat table too, but I wouldn't call that a toolrest. Are you Canahodians misnaming tools again?
Deposed Dictator, still in posession of the treasury
This message was composed entirely from recycled words and phrases using only renewable, caffeinated energy sources. No trees or whales died in the process.
Reply
Like

JT Metalworks
Advanced Member
JT Metalworks
Advanced Member
Joined: 28 Jan 2006, 22:18

17 Dec 2008, 19:14 #4

Shopsmiths are decent lathes, so-so drill presses, piss poor table saws, not enough grunt for a disk sander, and not enough rpm range for the bandsaw attachment (which my dad also has) - all that at an exorbitant price. Need I say more?

I wouldn't take one if it was free, unless I thought I could sell it to some unsuspecting sap (or someone who doesn't know a table saw shouldn't be chest high). If they said they just needed a lathe, I wouldn't feel bad about taking their money.
Reply
Like

Franz©
Advanced Member
Franz©
Advanced Member
Joined: 23 Jul 2005, 17:54

18 Dec 2008, 03:51 #5

You obviously have the model with the link belt type variable speed drive. Mine is from 1952, first generation, and I think cost about $150- back then.

I have the saw, lathe, drill chuck, disk sander and drum sander. Why in hell anybody would even try the bandsaw on the end of that machine is beyond me, or the jigsaw. For what the machine is, it's a pretty decent machine.

The second generation with variable drive leaves plenty to be desired, it's like any combination machine, as a table saw it makes a good lathe.

Disk sanders, as far as I'mconcerned are the most worthless waste of machine I ever saw, including industrial disk sanders. It's a self fulfilling chatter inducer because you are trying to sand at 2 different speeds on anything larger ahan ¼" against the abrasive.
Deposed Dictator, still in posession of the treasury
This message was composed entirely from recycled words and phrases using only renewable, caffeinated energy sources. No trees or whales died in the process.
Reply
Like

egon
Advanced Member
egon
Advanced Member
Joined: 29 Jul 2005, 11:22

18 Dec 2008, 10:39 #6

Just ordinary tool rests I was talking about. Some fellows have curved ones for doing inside work. :D

Turns out the original question has taken his/her broken tool rest to be welded and is having a few more made up. :D

I do have a sanding disk attachment for my radial arm saw. There have been a few times it has come in handy but I much prefer a the belt sander.

Those sanding disc's make for an oweee if used inappropriately and they get warm and the glue gets soft and the sanding paper disk flies off. :o
Egon

Old skin bag full of bones
Reply
Like

storts1
Advanced Member
storts1
Advanced Member
Joined: 17 Jan 2008, 12:01

19 Dec 2008, 15:25 #7

Franz or Jim or Egon,,This was Givin to me 10+ years ago,,works like a champ,has the varible sped with the big hanle.Buts be belt drivin,, ??? :D

Dont know what year it is,,and theres a Box of all the attachments,,Any guess what Year????????? Model Number,,Shop smith told me its a Older one because of the color???????? Dont us it alot,But its come in Handy! :D :D :D ! Jims right,the table saw is to High!!!!But the Old sucker will cut a 4 x 8 sheet of Plywood square!!,Just need that second person,and take your time!!Thanks!!!!!,Jack

Just waiting for our 18 inches of snow!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! And a nother foot on christmas eve!!!!!!! :( Thats when the Big Italion Feast is!!!! and got to Play santa!,For the Old Folks Home!!!!!!! :D
Reply
Like

Franz©
Advanced Member
Franz©
Advanced Member
Joined: 23 Jul 2005, 17:54

19 Dec 2008, 17:42 #8

That is second incarnation Jack.
The original company went belly up, and the machine you have was built by the people who bought up all the designs.

There is a web site for ShopSmith naturally, and you can get all kinds of info.

The one I just gave a young fellow was 3rd generation. I scored it in some deal with no attachments for about 20 bucks.
Deposed Dictator, still in posession of the treasury
This message was composed entirely from recycled words and phrases using only renewable, caffeinated energy sources. No trees or whales died in the process.
Reply
Like

storts1
Advanced Member
storts1
Advanced Member
Joined: 17 Jan 2008, 12:01

19 Dec 2008, 20:06 #9

Thanks!!!!!!! Still is a trooper when ya ned it,which is seldom,But hums away,,no bearing noise,,So there a new generation shopsmith,,we saw them at the Big E,,the fair we go to every year,,WOW,There not bashful on there prices,,especially if you want one with all the attachments : :o o The Table saw still looks to high!!!!!
Reply
Like

Franz©
Advanced Member
Franz©
Advanced Member
Joined: 23 Jul 2005, 17:54

19 Dec 2008, 20:16 #10

The saw ain't too high. The machine wasn't built for a friggin leprichan.

Build a riser to stand on, you know, like the booster seat you use at the resturant.
Deposed Dictator, still in posession of the treasury
This message was composed entirely from recycled words and phrases using only renewable, caffeinated energy sources. No trees or whales died in the process.
Reply
Like

egon
Advanced Member
egon
Advanced Member
Joined: 29 Jul 2005, 11:22

19 Dec 2008, 21:06 #11

Heard of them things but never did see one! :D
Egon

Old skin bag full of bones
Reply
Like

JT Metalworks
Advanced Member
JT Metalworks
Advanced Member
Joined: 28 Jan 2006, 22:18

19 Dec 2008, 23:05 #12

Building a platform to work with it negates the only marginal advantage it has - the ability to cut wide sections.

Ripping 4x8's is possible with it, but your helper needs to have as much skill on the machine as you do (so that eliminates spousal labor). I'd rather use my little job site saw on the floor for anything else. Besides, homie desperate has a panel saw in all their stores and if you're smart about who you select to assist you, you can sometimes get them to do accurate work.
Reply
Like

Franz©
Advanced Member
Franz©
Advanced Member
Joined: 23 Jul 2005, 17:54

20 Dec 2008, 03:50 #13

Damn near caused a divorce between my parents, I remember the screaming well. The hunk of tin that supports the blade guard and supposedly maintains the saw kerf is worthless too.

Personally I never understood why people don't just use a decent skillsaw and a screwdriver on a pair of sawhorses for long rips.
Deposed Dictator, still in posession of the treasury
This message was composed entirely from recycled words and phrases using only renewable, caffeinated energy sources. No trees or whales died in the process.
Reply
Like

JT Metalworks
Advanced Member
JT Metalworks
Advanced Member
Joined: 28 Jan 2006, 22:18

20 Dec 2008, 09:11 #14

I've only used the blade guards on big cabinet sized machines where they're supported by the U shaped bracket. I don't use the ones that go up behind the blade as I've found they encourage binding and subsequent kickbacks. Which brings up another reason I think those machines are worthless as a table saw - you have to tilt the work and work surface to cut a bevel. Talk about a pain to set up, let alone having to worry about the drop being munched by the blade as gravity does it's job when the parts are severed.
Reply
Like

egon
Advanced Member
egon
Advanced Member
Joined: 29 Jul 2005, 11:22

20 Dec 2008, 11:06 #15

if you're smart about who you select to assist you, you can sometimes get them to do accurate work.
Does this mean you find someone with a key and then get him/her to watch?

With those all in one tools there have been rumours that some one actually finished a project with one but most have been abandoned by the the folks that inherited the original machine and the project. Seems multi functions were nice but change over time made for horrendous actual project work!

For those plywood sheet cuts four 2x4 underneath, one clamped on top as a guide and a good Skillsaw with a good blade is all it takes for good accurate cuts.

Bys the way I got a real Skillsaw commercial grade that dates dates back to the early 70'ies. Replaced the switch once.
Egon

Old skin bag full of bones
Reply
Like