most regretful people on earth

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most regretful people on earth

Billy Joe
Member
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:30

30 Sep 2017, 02:07 #1

very good article about Mary Oliver and the artist's life. This is a real issue for me. I rarely have any free, uninterrupted time to write. Most of my poems are written in a few minutes often with interruptions. At times I've understood why Gauguin left family and job and ran off to Tahiti. My best poems have been the few times I've had a bit of uninterrupted time.  

https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/10/1 ... ower-time/
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Osel
Member
Joined: 20 Jun 2007, 07:33

04 Oct 2017, 17:02 #2

“The most regretful people on earth are those who felt the call to creative work, who felt their own creative power restive and uprising, and gave to it neither power nor time.”

Yes, and I feel the world is waking up to this. I feel very positive. 

But you do write, Billy, whether it is in snatched minutes, or howsoever. Maybe that is a path, its own path
that the being becomes so attuned to the possible, and to "no time" that everything aligns and pours through 
in moments. 

Thanks for posting
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Stephen Bunch
Member
Joined: 12 Oct 2010, 19:28

05 Oct 2017, 12:38 #3

Osel wrote: “The most regretful people on earth are those who felt the call to creative work, who felt their own creative power restive and uprising, and gave to it neither power nor time.”

Yes, and I feel the world is waking up to this. I feel very positive. 

But you do write, Billy, whether it is in snatched minutes, or howsoever. Maybe that is a path, its own path
that the being becomes so attuned to the possible, and to "no time" that everything aligns and pours through 
in moments. 

Thanks for posting
For me, writing is generally a process of accrual. I jot down notes as they occur to me--snippets of overheard conversation, something from a news story, an observation, a dream fragment--and let them compost. The actual writing usually doesn't require a big block of time and often is more a process of assembling than of creating from whole cloth. (Or this might be a way of saying that I lack discipline.) "Getting away" to write probably wouldn't work for me, as it would seem artificial or intentional in a way that writing can't, in my view.
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Billy Joe
Member
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:30

05 Oct 2017, 13:22 #4

So you guys have interruptions while you are writing. I find it difficult to believe that you don't have uninterrupted quiet time to write. I guess you guys are much better writers than me. You write such good poetry and all you have to do is jot some notes and throw it together with no quiet time to connect to the muse or your inner self. So I guess u both disagree with the article. The point of the article isn't about a particular and personal way of writing but the need for uninterrupted time.
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Stephen Bunch
Member
Joined: 12 Oct 2010, 19:28

06 Oct 2017, 13:16 #5

I had no uninterrupted time roughly 1989-2005 (pursuing career and having family), but resumed as the nest emptied and the career plateaued. But I'm also lazy and undisciplined--I waste a lot of time. A longtime friend with many books to his name also had career and family but had the discipline to carve out two hours every morning to write and/or submit work.
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toniclark
Member
Joined: 05 May 2006, 22:47

21 Oct 2017, 15:16 #6

Although the standard advice to writers is to write every day, the amount of time spent every day varies considerably. Many, many writers have little in the way of uninterrupted time. They have jobs, kids, all kinds of other obligations. They write when they can. A few minutes in the early morning, at lunch, or after the kids are in bed. Some never have blocks of uninterrupted time. When I have them, I find it hard to use the time productively. I do try harder to focus during April and November, but most of my poems are written quickly in the way Billy describes. 
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toniclark
Member
Joined: 05 May 2006, 22:47

21 Oct 2017, 15:17 #7

I look forward to reading the article about Mary Oliver. Living a creative life is a topic on which I've thought and read a lot lately. . . .
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Billy Joe
Member
Joined: 24 Jan 2010, 23:30

24 Oct 2017, 02:45 #8

Well, I feel even worse. I figured most of you had plenty of uninterrupted time. Now that I see that you don't I'm amazed at how good your poetry is and how bad mine is. I was thinking it was because I have little time to write, but I guess it's just a matter of not enough talent.
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FranklyDire
Member
Joined: 07 Jun 2015, 22:45

04 Nov 2017, 10:53 #9

I write in a variety of ways, but often it is in response to a spur,
a spark, something someones said, something that happened
an external stimuli. Some times it can come from arrogance, 
I can do better than that. Sometimes an exercise after reading 
a poem or an essay, that's part of writing too. I don't copy other
people, it doesn't work, I have to be me. I wrote a poem recently
and was quite pleased with it, but then I read up on glossae
and became engrossed in the cadence of a poem, went back
to mine and added two more strophes, what a difference.

I don't judge myself too harshly, what would be the point.
I am retired, I've put in years of physical and mental energy,
years of taking and dealing with stress, I am my own man
now and love every minute of life. This is my new life
better than a new wife, I love it. 

Then we die.
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GretaB
Member
Joined: 21 Aug 2017, 14:33

Yesterday, 19:07 #10

Joining this conversation late. I have lots of uninterrupted time or free time to do whatever I please. I love getting up every morning in April and November and writing and reading for 2-3 hours. My work is housework, yard work, family tending, art work, volunteer work and writing. If I were as busy as you, Billy, I would probably write one week a year at a writing conference, which is what I did all during my career. If I could write as well or as consistently as you under those circumstances, I'd be pretty damn happy with myself.
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