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Ekphrastic challenge: Rattle

Osel
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Joined: June 20th, 2007, 3:33 am

October 10th, 2015, 12:43 pm #1

http://www.rattle.com/poetry/extras/ekphrasis/

might be fun to approach this in one of the (SandScultpure forum) forms.

ghazal?
vilghazal?
. . .
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Guest
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November 24th, 2015, 12:53 pm #2

I entered a poem I wrote for this, but it wasn't a form poem. One of those with a long title. I like ekphrastic poetry. Fun!
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Osel
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Joined: June 20th, 2007, 3:33 am

November 27th, 2015, 1:35 pm #3

I replied to this yesterday, Judy! even saw the post posted, and now it's gone.

very strange. What I said was,

Great! I'm glad you did. I can't imagine getting my head around a form right now, October seems so hazy (when I first posted this) I couldn't get anything from the photo for October, when I took a look, but I sat with the picture/painting for this month, and it really started to come alive for me. I mean, now I'm quite in love with it--and could even live with it! That doesn't often happen to me, even with my own work.
edit: and since you tried it, I was inspired to give it a go. 
Last edited by Osel on November 27th, 2015, 1:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Stephen Bunch
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Joined: October 12th, 2010, 3:28 pm

November 30th, 2015, 3:21 pm #4

Just a comment here, and I suspect I'm an outlier: I don't write poems "about" things, so ekphrasis is counter-intuitive to me. In my view, poems may include works of art in their "materials," their "earth" (as Heidegger might say), but if I set out to write a poem about, descriptive of, or reacting to something, anything, I lose interest immediately. It becomes a mere exercise. My two cents.
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Osel
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Joined: June 20th, 2007, 3:33 am

November 30th, 2015, 7:01 pm #5

Outlier, such a good word. One could write an essay on the points you touch on: "reacting to something" and writing "about" speak volumes. ( I understand the aversion ) Who wants to add another cog to the make-work machine?
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toniclark
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Joined: May 5th, 2006, 6:47 pm

November 30th, 2015, 8:44 pm #6

But another work of art can be a trigger for releasing a poem wholly one's own. Often (usually?), the poem takes on a life of its own, becomes so much more than a commentary about or reaction to something else. Besides, there's nothing wrong with exercise.
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emurer
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Joined: May 1st, 2010, 2:37 pm

December 3rd, 2015, 10:25 am #7

I don't do at all well with connecting the visual and the verbal.  I'm more sound-oriented.  Wrote a poem imitating one of Bartok's Bulgarian rhythm pieces -- that's more my speed.
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TerryO
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Joined: November 28th, 2014, 9:40 am

December 3rd, 2015, 12:53 pm #8

Alison: "Another cog in the make work machine." That's good. I like that.

I am not picky. If a poem comes, it comes. If not, well, it isn't there, so how can I judge. I'm writing a poem right now about something I saw driving down the street last night. (I don't want to give too much away else I'll jinx it.) I chose to "see" it and I chose to focus some time on the image to find out what might come forth.

My point? For many years I felt powerless in the face of the "nothing" the world was giving me to write about. After flexing the poetic muscle this past year in a class, in a seminar, and on The Waters, I feel somewhat more confident in my voice and in my ability to express. I still run up against the false start--lord knows my current common book is filled with abandoned things. But sometimes an abandoned line, years later, might yield like tea leaves in the warm water of fresh attention. (Sorry for waxing poetic there.)

Not sure what I am saying, exactly. I just joining the conversation.
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FranklyDire
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Joined: June 7th, 2015, 6:45 pm

January 8th, 2016, 10:36 am #9

I hope this cog fits in some way Osel.
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