30.4 Forty Years Before the Internet

Collected Poems

30.4 Forty Years Before the Internet

Greta B
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Joined: 02 Apr 2008, 14:17

21 Sep 2014, 04:11 #1

Forty Years Before the Internet
Though we lived in the back washwe had “cousins” who lived better,distant do-gooders who sent ustheir presentable discardsin paper bags. Back then, most treasures
traveled that way – to hospital roomswhere we visited when various thingswent wrong, greasy bagsfrom our grandmother’s kitchenwhere out of pity for our working mother
and our irresponsible barfly father,she sent home steaming paper bagsfull of meat pies and guilt. There are photosof me and Heidi in striped and fringedmatching t-shirts our mother would never
have bought. In winter, the living roombecame a walled-off cave, blankets tackedto door frames to keep what heatwe could afford in fewer rooms,the stove with a pan of water on top
our humidifier in the dry months.Those were the good times, where after dinnereach night, we escaped to the big, cold empty roomto dance and move wildly, unbridled by poverty,knowing that a hot iron wielded by our mother
would smooth us into presentability,sensing that any future filling-time hobbieswould never distract usfrom the hard work needed to survive,that the scales would always tip  in some other, richer kid’s direction.
Last edited by Greta B on 21 Sep 2014, 17:16, edited 1 time in total.
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Siva Ramanathan
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 17:25

21 Sep 2014, 09:16 #2

These memoir poems can make a book if set chronologically.
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Guest
Posts 0
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21 Sep 2014, 14:03 #3

An ode to hand-me-downs! I too grew up with these fashions, this cousins jeans, that one's dress. I had so many cousins that there was always someone a little bigger than me.
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dale patterson
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Joined: 09 Apr 2011, 13:30

21 Sep 2014, 19:35 #4

My father said he was having too much fun as a child to realize he and his brothers were poor.
This line from you poem captures the same sentiment,

we escaped to the big, cold empty room
to dance and move wildly, unbridled by poverty,
Dale
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