What to do with an old Palm?

What to do with an old Palm?

Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

February 2nd, 2012, 1:36 am #1

Anybody remember the pre-smartphone "PDA"? The so-called "personal digital assistant"? Basically an early-generation digital notepad, a B&W touchscreen you used with a stylus, that had the usual address book, notepad and calculator type functions.

I just found my old Palm- that was the whole name- along with the wicked-cool optional folding keyboard. I threw some batteries in it, and lo and behold, it still works just fine.

'Course, one of the problems with the original Palms was the volatile memory- if the batteries died, you lost all your data. The OS was hardwired, of course, so with new batteries you'd just have to boot it up again and reset the date and clock, but whatever notes you put in the notepad, or dates you put into the calendar, as well as any extra programs- we call them "apps" now- were lost.

You were supposed to sync it with your PC daily- the idea was to take the Palm with you to the meeting (or whatever) take notes, then sync it with your PC so you'd have the notes and schedules on your desktop. And, if the batteries did die- AAA's, not rechargable internal- you just synced it with the PC, which would restore all the lost data (at least, everything up 'til the last time you synced.)

Anyway, these were actually fairly popular for a few years, with lots of 3rd party apps becoming available, much like smartphone apps today. And the reason I got this one, all those years ago, was to program my Racegun.

Stepping back again for some of you new guys, back in somewhere around 1999 to about 2002 or 2004, a company called Racegun (out of Denmark, if I recall) made an E-grip frame for the Autococker, very similar to the Eclipse E-Blades. The Race frame used a different sear system, and used an internal rechargable battery pack rather than the E-Blade's standard 9-volt.

One other difference was that, unlike the E-Blade's LED display, you had to connect your Race frame to a PC in order to change timing paramaters. You could do limited programming using the two buttons and single LED, but to time it properly and quickly, you used a PC.

Now, not everyone had a laptop, so that was kind of a trick to tune the gun at the field. Today, of course, everyone would have an iPhone app and cord- or do it through Bluetooth or even just IR, but back then, the hot trick was to have a PDA.

I had a couple of Raceguns (I still have at least one full frame and boxes of parts) and I also worked on them with some frequency, both local players guns and mailed-in customer guns. So I picked up a Palm, bought the Palm dongle from Racegun, and downloaded the software.

It worked, but as I recall, there was some niggling little issue with it- like the Palm software version wasn't always caught up with the gun board version, or maybe the Palm software just had bugs in it, or something. I honestly can't recall. I just know it didn't work 100% correctly all the time.

Now, of course, the computer I synced it with has long since died or was traded in for parts, and once the batteries died, of course the copy on the Palm evaporated. I still have, as I said, a Racegun frame, but last I tried it- several years ago- the battery would only hold a charge for a few hours. (Old Nicad, I think.)

I think I still have a copy of the Race software on my laptop- a 13 or 14 year old Thinkpad that still, surprisingly, works great- or at least it did, last time I tried it.

I suppose I should archive a copy of the software, in the eventuality even that one dies. I may have it on a floppy around here somewhere- that's what everything got saved on back then - but of course the floppy is probably unreadable now, and for that matter, I think the laptop is the last PC I have that still has a 3.5" drive.

But I digress.

Anyway, long story short, I have this fully-functional, decade-old Palm handheld PDA thing, with a really cool keyboard that folds up into a booklet the size of two packs of cigarrettes. Any ideas what I should do with it? Anybody want it?

Or, does anyone have a copy of the Racegun Palm software, our of blind luck or sheer packrattism? I have the Palm/Race dongle somewhere (I'm assuming it's in the box of parts)

Doc.
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Hans
Hans

February 2nd, 2012, 4:12 am #2

Probably have to get a cable of course, but I believe that those generations of Palm Pilots could get software to interface with OBD-II diagnostic routines in an automobile.

Never really did have enough applications to get them terribly useful.

-Hans
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Michael Guzzi
Michael Guzzi

February 2nd, 2012, 1:36 pm #3

Anybody remember the pre-smartphone "PDA"? The so-called "personal digital assistant"? Basically an early-generation digital notepad, a B&W touchscreen you used with a stylus, that had the usual address book, notepad and calculator type functions.

I just found my old Palm- that was the whole name- along with the wicked-cool optional folding keyboard. I threw some batteries in it, and lo and behold, it still works just fine.

'Course, one of the problems with the original Palms was the volatile memory- if the batteries died, you lost all your data. The OS was hardwired, of course, so with new batteries you'd just have to boot it up again and reset the date and clock, but whatever notes you put in the notepad, or dates you put into the calendar, as well as any extra programs- we call them "apps" now- were lost.

You were supposed to sync it with your PC daily- the idea was to take the Palm with you to the meeting (or whatever) take notes, then sync it with your PC so you'd have the notes and schedules on your desktop. And, if the batteries did die- AAA's, not rechargable internal- you just synced it with the PC, which would restore all the lost data (at least, everything up 'til the last time you synced.)

Anyway, these were actually fairly popular for a few years, with lots of 3rd party apps becoming available, much like smartphone apps today. And the reason I got this one, all those years ago, was to program my Racegun.

Stepping back again for some of you new guys, back in somewhere around 1999 to about 2002 or 2004, a company called Racegun (out of Denmark, if I recall) made an E-grip frame for the Autococker, very similar to the Eclipse E-Blades. The Race frame used a different sear system, and used an internal rechargable battery pack rather than the E-Blade's standard 9-volt.

One other difference was that, unlike the E-Blade's LED display, you had to connect your Race frame to a PC in order to change timing paramaters. You could do limited programming using the two buttons and single LED, but to time it properly and quickly, you used a PC.

Now, not everyone had a laptop, so that was kind of a trick to tune the gun at the field. Today, of course, everyone would have an iPhone app and cord- or do it through Bluetooth or even just IR, but back then, the hot trick was to have a PDA.

I had a couple of Raceguns (I still have at least one full frame and boxes of parts) and I also worked on them with some frequency, both local players guns and mailed-in customer guns. So I picked up a Palm, bought the Palm dongle from Racegun, and downloaded the software.

It worked, but as I recall, there was some niggling little issue with it- like the Palm software version wasn't always caught up with the gun board version, or maybe the Palm software just had bugs in it, or something. I honestly can't recall. I just know it didn't work 100% correctly all the time.

Now, of course, the computer I synced it with has long since died or was traded in for parts, and once the batteries died, of course the copy on the Palm evaporated. I still have, as I said, a Racegun frame, but last I tried it- several years ago- the battery would only hold a charge for a few hours. (Old Nicad, I think.)

I think I still have a copy of the Race software on my laptop- a 13 or 14 year old Thinkpad that still, surprisingly, works great- or at least it did, last time I tried it.

I suppose I should archive a copy of the software, in the eventuality even that one dies. I may have it on a floppy around here somewhere- that's what everything got saved on back then - but of course the floppy is probably unreadable now, and for that matter, I think the laptop is the last PC I have that still has a 3.5" drive.

But I digress.

Anyway, long story short, I have this fully-functional, decade-old Palm handheld PDA thing, with a really cool keyboard that folds up into a booklet the size of two packs of cigarrettes. Any ideas what I should do with it? Anybody want it?

Or, does anyone have a copy of the Racegun Palm software, our of blind luck or sheer packrattism? I have the Palm/Race dongle somewhere (I'm assuming it's in the box of parts)

Doc.
http://www.kornbakken.dk/

found this on a google search. Don't have a date so I don't know if it's old enough

Hope this helps.
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BigEvil
BigEvil

February 2nd, 2012, 5:00 pm #4

Anybody remember the pre-smartphone "PDA"? The so-called "personal digital assistant"? Basically an early-generation digital notepad, a B&W touchscreen you used with a stylus, that had the usual address book, notepad and calculator type functions.

I just found my old Palm- that was the whole name- along with the wicked-cool optional folding keyboard. I threw some batteries in it, and lo and behold, it still works just fine.

'Course, one of the problems with the original Palms was the volatile memory- if the batteries died, you lost all your data. The OS was hardwired, of course, so with new batteries you'd just have to boot it up again and reset the date and clock, but whatever notes you put in the notepad, or dates you put into the calendar, as well as any extra programs- we call them "apps" now- were lost.

You were supposed to sync it with your PC daily- the idea was to take the Palm with you to the meeting (or whatever) take notes, then sync it with your PC so you'd have the notes and schedules on your desktop. And, if the batteries did die- AAA's, not rechargable internal- you just synced it with the PC, which would restore all the lost data (at least, everything up 'til the last time you synced.)

Anyway, these were actually fairly popular for a few years, with lots of 3rd party apps becoming available, much like smartphone apps today. And the reason I got this one, all those years ago, was to program my Racegun.

Stepping back again for some of you new guys, back in somewhere around 1999 to about 2002 or 2004, a company called Racegun (out of Denmark, if I recall) made an E-grip frame for the Autococker, very similar to the Eclipse E-Blades. The Race frame used a different sear system, and used an internal rechargable battery pack rather than the E-Blade's standard 9-volt.

One other difference was that, unlike the E-Blade's LED display, you had to connect your Race frame to a PC in order to change timing paramaters. You could do limited programming using the two buttons and single LED, but to time it properly and quickly, you used a PC.

Now, not everyone had a laptop, so that was kind of a trick to tune the gun at the field. Today, of course, everyone would have an iPhone app and cord- or do it through Bluetooth or even just IR, but back then, the hot trick was to have a PDA.

I had a couple of Raceguns (I still have at least one full frame and boxes of parts) and I also worked on them with some frequency, both local players guns and mailed-in customer guns. So I picked up a Palm, bought the Palm dongle from Racegun, and downloaded the software.

It worked, but as I recall, there was some niggling little issue with it- like the Palm software version wasn't always caught up with the gun board version, or maybe the Palm software just had bugs in it, or something. I honestly can't recall. I just know it didn't work 100% correctly all the time.

Now, of course, the computer I synced it with has long since died or was traded in for parts, and once the batteries died, of course the copy on the Palm evaporated. I still have, as I said, a Racegun frame, but last I tried it- several years ago- the battery would only hold a charge for a few hours. (Old Nicad, I think.)

I think I still have a copy of the Race software on my laptop- a 13 or 14 year old Thinkpad that still, surprisingly, works great- or at least it did, last time I tried it.

I suppose I should archive a copy of the software, in the eventuality even that one dies. I may have it on a floppy around here somewhere- that's what everything got saved on back then - but of course the floppy is probably unreadable now, and for that matter, I think the laptop is the last PC I have that still has a 3.5" drive.

But I digress.

Anyway, long story short, I have this fully-functional, decade-old Palm handheld PDA thing, with a really cool keyboard that folds up into a booklet the size of two packs of cigarrettes. Any ideas what I should do with it? Anybody want it?

Or, does anyone have a copy of the Racegun Palm software, our of blind luck or sheer packrattism? I have the Palm/Race dongle somewhere (I'm assuming it's in the box of parts)

Doc.
I should have it. I have most of the Race stuff backed up. Yes, I still have a Race Halfie...and a few frames and assorted parts laying around. Shoot me an email and I will see if I can find it. If I dont have it, I should know where to get it from.

-S
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BigEvil
BigEvil

February 2nd, 2012, 5:00 pm #5

http://www.kornbakken.dk/

found this on a google search. Don't have a date so I don't know if it's old enough

Hope this helps.
-NT
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Daniel Meyer
Daniel Meyer

February 2nd, 2012, 5:10 pm #6

Anybody remember the pre-smartphone "PDA"? The so-called "personal digital assistant"? Basically an early-generation digital notepad, a B&W touchscreen you used with a stylus, that had the usual address book, notepad and calculator type functions.

I just found my old Palm- that was the whole name- along with the wicked-cool optional folding keyboard. I threw some batteries in it, and lo and behold, it still works just fine.

'Course, one of the problems with the original Palms was the volatile memory- if the batteries died, you lost all your data. The OS was hardwired, of course, so with new batteries you'd just have to boot it up again and reset the date and clock, but whatever notes you put in the notepad, or dates you put into the calendar, as well as any extra programs- we call them "apps" now- were lost.

You were supposed to sync it with your PC daily- the idea was to take the Palm with you to the meeting (or whatever) take notes, then sync it with your PC so you'd have the notes and schedules on your desktop. And, if the batteries did die- AAA's, not rechargable internal- you just synced it with the PC, which would restore all the lost data (at least, everything up 'til the last time you synced.)

Anyway, these were actually fairly popular for a few years, with lots of 3rd party apps becoming available, much like smartphone apps today. And the reason I got this one, all those years ago, was to program my Racegun.

Stepping back again for some of you new guys, back in somewhere around 1999 to about 2002 or 2004, a company called Racegun (out of Denmark, if I recall) made an E-grip frame for the Autococker, very similar to the Eclipse E-Blades. The Race frame used a different sear system, and used an internal rechargable battery pack rather than the E-Blade's standard 9-volt.

One other difference was that, unlike the E-Blade's LED display, you had to connect your Race frame to a PC in order to change timing paramaters. You could do limited programming using the two buttons and single LED, but to time it properly and quickly, you used a PC.

Now, not everyone had a laptop, so that was kind of a trick to tune the gun at the field. Today, of course, everyone would have an iPhone app and cord- or do it through Bluetooth or even just IR, but back then, the hot trick was to have a PDA.

I had a couple of Raceguns (I still have at least one full frame and boxes of parts) and I also worked on them with some frequency, both local players guns and mailed-in customer guns. So I picked up a Palm, bought the Palm dongle from Racegun, and downloaded the software.

It worked, but as I recall, there was some niggling little issue with it- like the Palm software version wasn't always caught up with the gun board version, or maybe the Palm software just had bugs in it, or something. I honestly can't recall. I just know it didn't work 100% correctly all the time.

Now, of course, the computer I synced it with has long since died or was traded in for parts, and once the batteries died, of course the copy on the Palm evaporated. I still have, as I said, a Racegun frame, but last I tried it- several years ago- the battery would only hold a charge for a few hours. (Old Nicad, I think.)

I think I still have a copy of the Race software on my laptop- a 13 or 14 year old Thinkpad that still, surprisingly, works great- or at least it did, last time I tried it.

I suppose I should archive a copy of the software, in the eventuality even that one dies. I may have it on a floppy around here somewhere- that's what everything got saved on back then - but of course the floppy is probably unreadable now, and for that matter, I think the laptop is the last PC I have that still has a 3.5" drive.

But I digress.

Anyway, long story short, I have this fully-functional, decade-old Palm handheld PDA thing, with a really cool keyboard that folds up into a booklet the size of two packs of cigarrettes. Any ideas what I should do with it? Anybody want it?

Or, does anyone have a copy of the Racegun Palm software, our of blind luck or sheer packrattism? I have the Palm/Race dongle somewhere (I'm assuming it's in the box of parts)

Doc.
My idea involves a skeet launcher and a shotgun :) (n/t)
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tkzv
tkzv

February 2nd, 2012, 11:05 pm #7

Anybody remember the pre-smartphone "PDA"? The so-called "personal digital assistant"? Basically an early-generation digital notepad, a B&W touchscreen you used with a stylus, that had the usual address book, notepad and calculator type functions.

I just found my old Palm- that was the whole name- along with the wicked-cool optional folding keyboard. I threw some batteries in it, and lo and behold, it still works just fine.

'Course, one of the problems with the original Palms was the volatile memory- if the batteries died, you lost all your data. The OS was hardwired, of course, so with new batteries you'd just have to boot it up again and reset the date and clock, but whatever notes you put in the notepad, or dates you put into the calendar, as well as any extra programs- we call them "apps" now- were lost.

You were supposed to sync it with your PC daily- the idea was to take the Palm with you to the meeting (or whatever) take notes, then sync it with your PC so you'd have the notes and schedules on your desktop. And, if the batteries did die- AAA's, not rechargable internal- you just synced it with the PC, which would restore all the lost data (at least, everything up 'til the last time you synced.)

Anyway, these were actually fairly popular for a few years, with lots of 3rd party apps becoming available, much like smartphone apps today. And the reason I got this one, all those years ago, was to program my Racegun.

Stepping back again for some of you new guys, back in somewhere around 1999 to about 2002 or 2004, a company called Racegun (out of Denmark, if I recall) made an E-grip frame for the Autococker, very similar to the Eclipse E-Blades. The Race frame used a different sear system, and used an internal rechargable battery pack rather than the E-Blade's standard 9-volt.

One other difference was that, unlike the E-Blade's LED display, you had to connect your Race frame to a PC in order to change timing paramaters. You could do limited programming using the two buttons and single LED, but to time it properly and quickly, you used a PC.

Now, not everyone had a laptop, so that was kind of a trick to tune the gun at the field. Today, of course, everyone would have an iPhone app and cord- or do it through Bluetooth or even just IR, but back then, the hot trick was to have a PDA.

I had a couple of Raceguns (I still have at least one full frame and boxes of parts) and I also worked on them with some frequency, both local players guns and mailed-in customer guns. So I picked up a Palm, bought the Palm dongle from Racegun, and downloaded the software.

It worked, but as I recall, there was some niggling little issue with it- like the Palm software version wasn't always caught up with the gun board version, or maybe the Palm software just had bugs in it, or something. I honestly can't recall. I just know it didn't work 100% correctly all the time.

Now, of course, the computer I synced it with has long since died or was traded in for parts, and once the batteries died, of course the copy on the Palm evaporated. I still have, as I said, a Racegun frame, but last I tried it- several years ago- the battery would only hold a charge for a few hours. (Old Nicad, I think.)

I think I still have a copy of the Race software on my laptop- a 13 or 14 year old Thinkpad that still, surprisingly, works great- or at least it did, last time I tried it.

I suppose I should archive a copy of the software, in the eventuality even that one dies. I may have it on a floppy around here somewhere- that's what everything got saved on back then - but of course the floppy is probably unreadable now, and for that matter, I think the laptop is the last PC I have that still has a 3.5" drive.

But I digress.

Anyway, long story short, I have this fully-functional, decade-old Palm handheld PDA thing, with a really cool keyboard that folds up into a booklet the size of two packs of cigarrettes. Any ideas what I should do with it? Anybody want it?

Or, does anyone have a copy of the Racegun Palm software, our of blind luck or sheer packrattism? I have the Palm/Race dongle somewhere (I'm assuming it's in the box of parts)

Doc.
If it's Palm, it's likely to have an SD/MMC slot. Those support SD/MMC cards up to 2G. Though you may need to update ROM, if the device is very old. I forgot the names, but there were several programs to save/restore RAM contents to/from the card.

Sony PDAs had "memory sticks" -- much the same, but smaller (up to 128M, if I remember correctly). Also there were a few cheapest Palm models without card slots.
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Attic Rat
Attic Rat

February 2nd, 2012, 11:51 pm #8

Anybody remember the pre-smartphone "PDA"? The so-called "personal digital assistant"? Basically an early-generation digital notepad, a B&W touchscreen you used with a stylus, that had the usual address book, notepad and calculator type functions.

I just found my old Palm- that was the whole name- along with the wicked-cool optional folding keyboard. I threw some batteries in it, and lo and behold, it still works just fine.

'Course, one of the problems with the original Palms was the volatile memory- if the batteries died, you lost all your data. The OS was hardwired, of course, so with new batteries you'd just have to boot it up again and reset the date and clock, but whatever notes you put in the notepad, or dates you put into the calendar, as well as any extra programs- we call them "apps" now- were lost.

You were supposed to sync it with your PC daily- the idea was to take the Palm with you to the meeting (or whatever) take notes, then sync it with your PC so you'd have the notes and schedules on your desktop. And, if the batteries did die- AAA's, not rechargable internal- you just synced it with the PC, which would restore all the lost data (at least, everything up 'til the last time you synced.)

Anyway, these were actually fairly popular for a few years, with lots of 3rd party apps becoming available, much like smartphone apps today. And the reason I got this one, all those years ago, was to program my Racegun.

Stepping back again for some of you new guys, back in somewhere around 1999 to about 2002 or 2004, a company called Racegun (out of Denmark, if I recall) made an E-grip frame for the Autococker, very similar to the Eclipse E-Blades. The Race frame used a different sear system, and used an internal rechargable battery pack rather than the E-Blade's standard 9-volt.

One other difference was that, unlike the E-Blade's LED display, you had to connect your Race frame to a PC in order to change timing paramaters. You could do limited programming using the two buttons and single LED, but to time it properly and quickly, you used a PC.

Now, not everyone had a laptop, so that was kind of a trick to tune the gun at the field. Today, of course, everyone would have an iPhone app and cord- or do it through Bluetooth or even just IR, but back then, the hot trick was to have a PDA.

I had a couple of Raceguns (I still have at least one full frame and boxes of parts) and I also worked on them with some frequency, both local players guns and mailed-in customer guns. So I picked up a Palm, bought the Palm dongle from Racegun, and downloaded the software.

It worked, but as I recall, there was some niggling little issue with it- like the Palm software version wasn't always caught up with the gun board version, or maybe the Palm software just had bugs in it, or something. I honestly can't recall. I just know it didn't work 100% correctly all the time.

Now, of course, the computer I synced it with has long since died or was traded in for parts, and once the batteries died, of course the copy on the Palm evaporated. I still have, as I said, a Racegun frame, but last I tried it- several years ago- the battery would only hold a charge for a few hours. (Old Nicad, I think.)

I think I still have a copy of the Race software on my laptop- a 13 or 14 year old Thinkpad that still, surprisingly, works great- or at least it did, last time I tried it.

I suppose I should archive a copy of the software, in the eventuality even that one dies. I may have it on a floppy around here somewhere- that's what everything got saved on back then - but of course the floppy is probably unreadable now, and for that matter, I think the laptop is the last PC I have that still has a 3.5" drive.

But I digress.

Anyway, long story short, I have this fully-functional, decade-old Palm handheld PDA thing, with a really cool keyboard that folds up into a booklet the size of two packs of cigarrettes. Any ideas what I should do with it? Anybody want it?

Or, does anyone have a copy of the Racegun Palm software, our of blind luck or sheer packrattism? I have the Palm/Race dongle somewhere (I'm assuming it's in the box of parts)

Doc.
But I still have my Palm M515. Mostly, I use it as a pocket-sized book reader.
I downloaded a bunch of books at Gutenberg.org to fill it. I travel by air occasionally, and it's handy to have a book to read.

The notepad function is sometimes useful, but since I don't have a keyboard, that's kind of a pain. The "Graphiti" method is error-prone, and the built-in stylus-keypad is slow.

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J.Cook
J.Cook

February 3rd, 2012, 1:38 am #9

If it's Palm, it's likely to have an SD/MMC slot. Those support SD/MMC cards up to 2G. Though you may need to update ROM, if the device is very old. I forgot the names, but there were several programs to save/restore RAM contents to/from the card.

Sony PDAs had "memory sticks" -- much the same, but smaller (up to 128M, if I remember correctly). Also there were a few cheapest Palm models without card slots.
You might be thinking the active LCD screen models. Doc's most likely referring to the first and second gen models http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PalmPilot).

Having owned, in order:

Palm Pilot Pro (2nd gen model)
Handspring Visor
Palm Tungsten E

I can state with some certainty that the original mono-color models from the first two generations not only didn't have an SD/MMC slot, but the only possible way to expand them was to remove the memory card and replace it with something else. (such devices, I might add, did exist!)

Of the three devices, the Tungsten E was probably the best of the lot, despite a non-user replaceable battery and the volatile user storage. (that little niggling problem was finally fixed with the E2) I do have a fond memory, however, of dropping my palm pro on a concrete floor, which blew out the batteries and memory card(!), but once put back togather and restored, kept right on ticking.
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Snowtroll
Snowtroll

February 3rd, 2012, 10:23 am #10

Actually, I don't think that PAlm supported any kind of additional memory until after the V series?
And when they started, it was only halfheartedly...

On the other hand, there was supposed to be a 'supercap' on the PCB in them, that should be enough to safeguard the memory of the older Palms while you swapped batteries.
(Assuming that you did it quickly)

Not too certain about the supercap story as I never tested it with any of the PAlms in my collection.
I was (and still am) a Psion PDA fan, and they ALL(from the SIBO range introduction in 1989. The Original Organiser from 1984 stored everything in EPROMs so never lost anything, and the Series II from 1986/87 had the supercap) had a proper backup battery to keep memory safe.

The Handsprings(Licensed Palm OS) had 'Springboard' plug-in modules which could be camera, program carts, or even backup memory. But the implementation really sucked, if I remember. (I have one somewhere... )

The fact is that the 'classic' Palm OS didn't support anything but the built-in memory and any work that was done to 'add to it' ended up a frightful hodge-podge that was unreliable at best.
This was NOT caused by the 'limitiations in the processing power of the DragonBall CPU' as many diehads would claim, just the OS architecture itself.
(The DragonBall was a full 16bit CPU)

That said, they're nice little gadgets, and for basic listwriting and such, they're still good.
Download one of the Basic variants for it, and it's not that difficult to use it for control of equipment with serial ports.
Anyone trying to synch an older serial version with a 'modern' PC without serial ports will need a GOOD USB-Serial adapter, though. A lot of the stuff sold online is junk, and barely works with XON/XOFF handshaking, much less the HW handshake that the Palms need.
I usually suggest one that contains an FTDI chip as it's easy for manufacturers to build a port with full HW handshake using these. (When in doubt, buy one from www.parallax.com, as the programming links they use also needs HW Handshake)
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