Hans
Hans

August 10th, 2012, 5:46 am #11

Okay here's what's up. The church in the area was letting us use their field for free initially, then started charging 50 bucks a day. Not to bad, and since they are taking some risk letting us play there, no one thought it was that much. Now however they want to charge 15 for the first hour, 20 for the second, and 25 per hour after the first. Bugger that, I got some land, and tossed up a quick field to play on.

Over all I felt it played pretty well for a throw together of pallets, wire spools, and some typar. However having been a nuclear machinist mate in the navy I can't let it go with as is. I know it can be better, so I'll work more on it this weekend to smooth out the rough spots I noticed.

The initial field set up was a good sized concept field about120 by 185. Good size for the groups we had. Also to give it a little flare we left a few stands of trees on one edge for a little woodsball feel on that side. In the middle of the field we have a giant hill with really tall grass, lots of paths, and a flat top with a few small barricades. Pretty much used this for capture the flag games. It's really amazing to move around on, saw a lot of ambushes happen I wouldn't have thought possible. Finally had some air bunkers on gravel set up for small games, which saw almost no use at all.

At the end of the day cleanup was a snap except for the air bunkers. Definitely showed me that I don't want to use those, to much maintenance and cleaning every day. Took us a hour to deflate 12 of them since we dare not leave them in place. Another hour to clean off the paint and stow them, plus a ton of space in the truck.

So anyhow, I digress. Having explained the basic setup I was wondering if anyone had ideas I could use for constructing bunkers, what types of materials work well etc. also field diagrams would be useful. I tend to favor fields that slow a long game, but encourage people to move around on as well. Nothing sucks the wind out of your sails like watching 2 kids bunker at far ends and wing paint at each other for 10 minutes. Good for paint sales, but makes game delays to long IMO.

Some of the ideas we've had:
Buying the log kiddy playgrounds and setting those up as bunkers but without the swings and other accessories.
Creating "walls" and cutting various shaped holes in them
Sandbag pillboxes
Low hanging netting to restrict movement, but not fire.
Conex box with the ends cut off for a tunnel
Wrecked boat buried to keel

Money is kinda restricted, but I know a lot of people with a lot of junk that's been sitting around for 20+ years.

Anyhow, any ideas or thoughts would be welcome, docs already helped out a lot. But one of my goals is to put in things that people want, not just what I want.
Just a pair of poles with some airball netting hung in between.

As long as you don't go crazy and do more than a few, I have found them some of the most intriguing things on a field. I mean, you can see (and be seen by) your opponent. It's just plain wierd that you can look right at the guy, but have no shot at all.

Also, wooden stockade type barriers are simple but effective. Either single wall, or various forms of X's, triangles, and things like that. Don't use plywood or MDF though, it falls apart too soon in an outdoor environment even if painted. You'll be lucky to get plywood to last 3 years. Planks lasts much longer, particularly if you paint them seasonally, decades aren't unreasonable.

-Hans



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Snowtroll
Snowtroll

August 10th, 2012, 7:50 am #12

You just have to use Marine grade plywood.
Unfortunately, the good stuff costs 3 times of normal, or even 'waterproof' plywood used in construction.
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joecrouse
joecrouse

August 10th, 2012, 12:07 pm #13

... It would give a whole new meaning to "Don't Shoot! I'm only the Piano Player!" But s/he still has to wear a face shield.

Play List:
Merry Go Round Broke Down
Powerhouse
Smile Darn Ya Smile
William Tell Overture (Rossini)
Liszt Hungarian Rhapsody #2
The Walking away theme from hulk
Ya know at like the end of the day n stuff.
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Andrew
Andrew

August 10th, 2012, 1:21 pm #14

Unless you're specifically trying to build an "urban wasteland" or "urban warfare" type of scenario field, skip the cars. Even after all the work needed to safe it (removal of the glass, gas tank, any oil, weld the doors, etc.) they're a pain to move in and worse, almost impossible to move once placed, if and when you might want to reorganize the field.

You're kind of overthinking the barricades. Unless it's a well-run scenario game with missions and whatnot, the players don't care whether they're hiding behind a well-painted plywood Sherman tank mockup or a stack of old tires. The game is the interaction between players- bunkers are just something the players use to keep from getting shot. And for that, a pile of old cable spools works just as well as a $100 inflatable beer can.

One of the best local field we ever had was Rocky's out in Caribou Hills, and he used three kinds of very basic barricades:



Two oil drums welded together to make a pillar, stacks of tires (the round ones are big tractor tires wrapped with heavy plastic) and two kinds of constructed bunkers, both being simple wood skeletons with heavy plastic sheeting. The domed ones had "ribs" of PVC pipe, as I recall.

The plastic sheeting is a product similar to Typar, but it's solid plastic, not the woven stuff. It was very heavy and durable, and basically made a rigid copy of an inflatable bunker.

That's all you really need. And one thing I like about that setup above, is it doesn't look like a junkyard. There IS a PR aspect to the appearance of the overall field, both in your location right alongside the highway like that, and to a prospective customer- especially the mothers of younger kids. A field like that above looks somewhat friendlier (and safer) than a yard full of wrecked cars.

If it were me, I'd spend some time making about half a dozen each of those triangular and domed barricades- they're just simple wooden frames with the plastic stapled on- and pick up some oil barrels. (Just be careful when you go to weld 'em together, if they ever held anything remotely flammable.) And all three are lightweight and easy to move when it comes time to reorganize the field.

Doc.
Your right that is one clean looking field. The barricades present A nice clean image. I'll defiantly take ideas from this, great pic!

I do have a question about the plastic though, does it hold up well on the half tubes? I've noticed that paintballs can distort and puncture the typar we've been using.
I imagine at close range any plastic sheeting will eventually have issues. I found a guy with a lot of old tractor tires hell give us so that should allow us to make some better tire bunkers than we have at the moment.

As for the cars, the most I'd use would be 2, and that's well into the future and only if we do an urban street theme on one of the fields, but I have taken into account the logistics of cleanup and moving said cars. Personally I'm not really sold on them myself I think they'd be kinda low and take up a lot of room, however my partner has his heart set on a urban street setting, and we have the room in the back behind the hill, and it'd be outta sight of the highway. This weekend were probably just gunna focus on fixing the parking, roads, entrance, and staging area. Still lots to do. If you have a lot of pics of other field setups I'd love to see them. I'm not above taking ideas from others.
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Andrew
Andrew

August 10th, 2012, 1:25 pm #15

Just a pair of poles with some airball netting hung in between.

As long as you don't go crazy and do more than a few, I have found them some of the most intriguing things on a field. I mean, you can see (and be seen by) your opponent. It's just plain wierd that you can look right at the guy, but have no shot at all.

Also, wooden stockade type barriers are simple but effective. Either single wall, or various forms of X's, triangles, and things like that. Don't use plywood or MDF though, it falls apart too soon in an outdoor environment even if painted. You'll be lucky to get plywood to last 3 years. Planks lasts much longer, particularly if you paint them seasonally, decades aren't unreasonable.

-Hans


I like the net idea. I was actually toying with using fishing nets as a soft barricade. But yeah that sounds really cool, maybe do a starting bunker of net for each side or something, thanks for the input!
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Robert L Martin
Robert L Martin

August 10th, 2012, 1:55 pm #16

Unless you're specifically trying to build an "urban wasteland" or "urban warfare" type of scenario field, skip the cars. Even after all the work needed to safe it (removal of the glass, gas tank, any oil, weld the doors, etc.) they're a pain to move in and worse, almost impossible to move once placed, if and when you might want to reorganize the field.

You're kind of overthinking the barricades. Unless it's a well-run scenario game with missions and whatnot, the players don't care whether they're hiding behind a well-painted plywood Sherman tank mockup or a stack of old tires. The game is the interaction between players- bunkers are just something the players use to keep from getting shot. And for that, a pile of old cable spools works just as well as a $100 inflatable beer can.

One of the best local field we ever had was Rocky's out in Caribou Hills, and he used three kinds of very basic barricades:



Two oil drums welded together to make a pillar, stacks of tires (the round ones are big tractor tires wrapped with heavy plastic) and two kinds of constructed bunkers, both being simple wood skeletons with heavy plastic sheeting. The domed ones had "ribs" of PVC pipe, as I recall.

The plastic sheeting is a product similar to Typar, but it's solid plastic, not the woven stuff. It was very heavy and durable, and basically made a rigid copy of an inflatable bunker.

That's all you really need. And one thing I like about that setup above, is it doesn't look like a junkyard. There IS a PR aspect to the appearance of the overall field, both in your location right alongside the highway like that, and to a prospective customer- especially the mothers of younger kids. A field like that above looks somewhat friendlier (and safer) than a yard full of wrecked cars.

If it were me, I'd spend some time making about half a dozen each of those triangular and domed barricades- they're just simple wooden frames with the plastic stapled on- and pick up some oil barrels. (Just be careful when you go to weld 'em together, if they ever held anything remotely flammable.) And all three are lightweight and easy to move when it comes time to reorganize the field.

Doc.
having various Booths (phone boxes, outhouses ect) scattered around could also be cool (bonus points if you have tunnels connecting them).
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Solar
Solar

August 10th, 2012, 1:56 pm #17

Also I wouldn't leave any glass in the car. You will have bits and shards the first day... I would also try to avoid any acute angles in any of the props...
Thinking long term, sooner or later parts of the car will rust / corrode to the point of a foot / shoulder / arm breaking through... which could be anything from a hilarious "I'm stuck" to "f*** I think I ripped an artery".

No sharp edges of any kind, very much seconded. Unfortunately, I don't see how this could be done with gutted cars.
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Critter Rhode
Critter Rhode

August 10th, 2012, 3:27 pm #18

I think maybe stripping it down to just a body and wheels. take motor, trans, driveshaft, windows, seats, and all the dash out. Then remove any current rust and spry the inside and out with the spray on bed liners stuff. Like LINE-x, or Rhino. maybe fill any open holes with welded plates and expand a foam. Maybe see if you can get a discount on the liner by the business can leave their logo on the truck.
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Silcas
Silcas

August 10th, 2012, 4:29 pm #19

Okay here's what's up. The church in the area was letting us use their field for free initially, then started charging 50 bucks a day. Not to bad, and since they are taking some risk letting us play there, no one thought it was that much. Now however they want to charge 15 for the first hour, 20 for the second, and 25 per hour after the first. Bugger that, I got some land, and tossed up a quick field to play on.

Over all I felt it played pretty well for a throw together of pallets, wire spools, and some typar. However having been a nuclear machinist mate in the navy I can't let it go with as is. I know it can be better, so I'll work more on it this weekend to smooth out the rough spots I noticed.

The initial field set up was a good sized concept field about120 by 185. Good size for the groups we had. Also to give it a little flare we left a few stands of trees on one edge for a little woodsball feel on that side. In the middle of the field we have a giant hill with really tall grass, lots of paths, and a flat top with a few small barricades. Pretty much used this for capture the flag games. It's really amazing to move around on, saw a lot of ambushes happen I wouldn't have thought possible. Finally had some air bunkers on gravel set up for small games, which saw almost no use at all.

At the end of the day cleanup was a snap except for the air bunkers. Definitely showed me that I don't want to use those, to much maintenance and cleaning every day. Took us a hour to deflate 12 of them since we dare not leave them in place. Another hour to clean off the paint and stow them, plus a ton of space in the truck.

So anyhow, I digress. Having explained the basic setup I was wondering if anyone had ideas I could use for constructing bunkers, what types of materials work well etc. also field diagrams would be useful. I tend to favor fields that slow a long game, but encourage people to move around on as well. Nothing sucks the wind out of your sails like watching 2 kids bunker at far ends and wing paint at each other for 10 minutes. Good for paint sales, but makes game delays to long IMO.

Some of the ideas we've had:
Buying the log kiddy playgrounds and setting those up as bunkers but without the swings and other accessories.
Creating "walls" and cutting various shaped holes in them
Sandbag pillboxes
Low hanging netting to restrict movement, but not fire.
Conex box with the ends cut off for a tunnel
Wrecked boat buried to keel

Money is kinda restricted, but I know a lot of people with a lot of junk that's been sitting around for 20+ years.

Anyhow, any ideas or thoughts would be welcome, docs already helped out a lot. But one of my goals is to put in things that people want, not just what I want.
I've got a few bunkers made of Painted 1/2" CDX that have lasted 2 years now. No real visable change in them due to weather.

OSB will shred over time as paint hits it. Used to frequent a field in Anchorage that used OSB on it's target range. We had cut a rather large hole right through the wood within a few months of playing there.

The biggest thing that will help you though is pre-planning, and designing your field on paper. The better prepared you are before you begin the actual building, the smoother it will run. This way you can actually look at different things such as flowing from one field into another (for sectioned off small fields you'd like to combine into one large field on the occassion) as well as conceptual fields to see if they establish the kind of environment you're trying to mimic.

(Also, inflatables work well for their intended purpose. Yes the initial set up can be a pain, but if you do leave them up over a summer, they can be a very good way to have an infinitely modifiable field. Just deflate them at the end of the day, and come out an hour early to inflate them prior to opening.)
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Renegade_Azzy
Renegade_Azzy

August 10th, 2012, 7:59 pm #20

I think maybe stripping it down to just a body and wheels. take motor, trans, driveshaft, windows, seats, and all the dash out. Then remove any current rust and spry the inside and out with the spray on bed liners stuff. Like LINE-x, or Rhino. maybe fill any open holes with welded plates and expand a foam. Maybe see if you can get a discount on the liner by the business can leave their logo on the truck.
Why not remove all sharp edges, fill everything with air, and pad the floor, remove the gun shaped things, and have them all shoot lasers at each other?

Bed liner? You do know that costs about $50-100 a gallon.

Hell Survivors in Michigan has a lot of old military hardware out on the feild, and it hasnt been given the toddler treatment. Hell, they try and keep you out of the backs by tossing in jumbled old lumber.

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