TWB 7/6: Someone Listened

TWB 7/6: Someone Listened

Tobias Amaranth
Tobias Amaranth

July 6th, 2012, 6:27 am #1

Or at least read Jake's mind.
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Robin Bobcat
Robin Bobcat

July 6th, 2012, 4:11 pm #2

Yeah... I recall one of my first times playing, I realized that taking a large pipe (the 'Sub') gave a massive tactical advantage, but nobody went for it right away. When we started off, I dug in hard and RAN, using the Sub itself as cover...

... only to take a ball smack to the center of my goggle lens. It seems that the experienced players knew to fire just over the top of the pipe, letting gravity drop the balls to hit incoming opponents.
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CF
CF

July 6th, 2012, 8:03 pm #3

Or at least read Jake's mind.
Whenever someone says, "I got this", it's the same as when someone says "Am I right?": Not just "no", but "*HELL* NO".

And the Headlong Charge is the first sign of a mentally-deficient military mind; Smart Fighters look for these things called "flanks"....
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Tobias Amaranth
Tobias Amaranth

July 6th, 2012, 9:38 pm #4

Or at least read Jake's mind.
Boob shot as requested, but by the wrong person. |D I'm terrible, I know.
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Andrick
Andrick

July 7th, 2012, 9:16 am #5

Whenever someone says, "I got this", it's the same as when someone says "Am I right?": Not just "no", but "*HELL* NO".

And the Headlong Charge is the first sign of a mentally-deficient military mind; Smart Fighters look for these things called "flanks"....
The way Doc has been drawing the action, and having his characters calling out the play-by-plays, both opponents clearly see each other from the word "go." Flanking requires at least one of the following: superior mobility, set ambush, or fog of war. Each of these is problematic to have in a non-team match because the advantage of mobility can rapidly change back and forth, setting an ambush requires superior understanding of the field AND successfully predicting where & when your opponent is going to be, and the fog of war is your opponent losing contact with you without you losing contact of him. What Doc has been showing has been how everything which can be used to gain a flanking advantage has been used to win the game instead.

We've seen Tawny use superior mobility in a HEADLONG CHARGE for the victory in her first match against Sandy. Sandy may have been faster and more nimble than Tawny but Tawny used suppressing fire to pin Sandy behind cover eliminating her mobility while Tawny was free to move.

We've seen Sandy in her first game against Pirta use the fog of war to move directly up Pirta's lane of fire to snatch victory right out in the open. Sandy maintained contact with Pirta because she could see and hear Pirta firing at her former position but Pirta, neither seeing Sandy's low-crawl to a new position nor receiving return fire from the last known location of her opponent, had to stop firing and ascertain Sandy's new location.

So far, no one has shown any superior understanding of the field layout and the last person to say they had has just had the quickest defeat displayed thus far in the comic. Pirta was actually the first person depicted in this arc as trying to actually flank her opponent, an action which turned into a rout as Tawny followed her. In that same action, Tawny had attempted to predict Pirta's actions and tried to ambush her but Tawny's ambush failed. Here is where the fog of war and mutual loss of contact resulted in both being flanked by the other but only one actually capitalizing on the situation. If Pirta had been aware of Tawny's failed ambush she could have used her clear line of sight to fire on the exposed and disorientated Tawny for a potential game winning shot. But Pirta was in full rout which allowed Tawny the time to find, follow, and successfully "gun down" the fleeing snow cat.

I will admit that the one-on-one matches are allowing the three girls to hone the skills what will be useful for flanking in team play. That said, the player who keeps her wits about her and doesn't lose her cool seems to fare better.

And, historically, headlong charges have worked. I can cite ancient to modern examples by victorious forces that have been numerically inferior, poorly equipped, poorly supplied, or tactically disadvantaged compared to the predicted-to-win forces they charged. Very smart and capable men have used such a tactic in their storied careers. Like ANY OTHER TACTIC the charge is only effective when certain conditions are met and it is the shortcoming of any military leader whom attempts to use tactics which are inappropriate to the objectives and the conditions on the field.
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Shargo
Shargo

July 8th, 2012, 12:59 pm #6

Boob shot as requested, but by the wrong person. |D I'm terrible, I know.
You point at WHOMS boobs... oh oh time to hide!!!
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