THIS might be the start of the Dreaded Machine Gun Marker....

Joined: January 11th, 2016, 8:57 pm

April 5th, 2018, 3:18 am #1

Using a car a/c compressor scroll, electric motor and an intriguing feeder system that might not chop too many balls, while spitting them out at about 50 balls per second, at a fast enough speed that the balls dent sheet ally.....

I WANT ONE!!!

Check it out!

 
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Joined: March 13th, 2015, 6:30 pm

April 5th, 2018, 8:10 am #2

Well it is certainly nifty.  I'd like to see it in action with actual paintballs as that looks like it would be a royal pain to clean if it decided to go full blender on them.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 5th, 2018, 8:46 am #3

Paintballs, unfortunately, would never survive that kind of mechanism. The ammo has to both "scrub" and "roll", often in different directions.

If you want a nearly unusable but wicked fast paintball gun, just fit a tall "stick feeder" over a bare-bones breech with no bolt. Have a shop-air compressor blowgun in place of the bolt.

You have to have the "barrel" pretty loose and sloppy to allow air to blow past- otherwise it blows back up the feed tube. But if you do it right, you can empty a fifty-ball tube in about a second. 😀

Doc.
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Joined: July 10th, 2016, 2:02 pm

April 6th, 2018, 12:42 am #4

This is a  centrifugal electric slingshot.  It has many superfluous parts that don't contribute to its function, which I find ugly and excessive - ironic because they were probably added "to make it look cool." 

Don't substitute marbles for paintballs; it's rude.  It'll get you kicked out of the park and invited to stay out.   If you used it with paintballs as ammo instead of marbles, you'd be able to spray-paint with a fine mist.  And if paintballs would fire intact?  they'd have a non-axial spin, which would make them curve in weird ways. 

Electric slingshots of one type or another (but probably not this type) could be good paint markers though; The question is whether the energy-to-encumbrance ratio is better with compressed CO2 or batteries. 
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Joined: January 11th, 2016, 8:57 pm

April 6th, 2018, 2:08 am #5

Hey, I don't care if it's firing paintballs or plastic marbles or steel ball bearings! Our neighbor's cat will learn never to 'drop anchor' in our vegetable garden again!

And the way it sprays balls, only Daryl and Larry would want one in Doc's world, and at 50 balls a second, I suspect it'd be a b**ch to chrony!
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Joined: August 16th, 2016, 11:47 am

April 6th, 2018, 5:45 am #6

Beejay5169 wrote: Hey, I don't care if it's firing paintballs or plastic marbles or steel ball bearings! Our neighbor's cat will learn never to 'drop anchor' in our vegetable garden again!

And the way it sprays balls, only Daryl and Larry would want one in Doc's world, and at 50 balls a second, I suspect it'd be a b**ch to chrony!
Not hard to crony, just expensive. Military cronys the GAU-8A in the A-10.  And all the other gatling type guns
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Joined: October 8th, 2014, 2:05 pm

April 6th, 2018, 1:24 pm #7

Antknot wrote: Not hard to crony, just expensive. Military cronys the GAU-8A in the A-10.  And all the other gatling type guns
A friend of mine used to do field service for a company that made batch mixing equipment. One of his favorite clients was a munitions plant that made artillery shells and ammo for the Avenger cannon. He got to see them do a few QC test firings during his visits.

On one trip they took him to an artillery test range. They wrote his name on the projectile on a shell, loaded it into a gun, and fired it toward a test box with a high speed camera in it. When they pulled the photo you could clearly see his name on the projectile while it was still in flight. Their manufacturing processes were so tight, they knew exactly how many rotations that thing would make between the gun barrel and the camera, and loaded the shell into the gun accordingly.

He joked that he'd never die from a gunshot wound because the bullet with his name on it had already been fired.
If it ain't broke, I'll fix it!
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Joined: May 22nd, 2016, 10:05 pm

April 6th, 2018, 4:23 pm #8

hinermad wrote:
Antknot wrote: Not hard to crony, just expensive. Military cronys the GAU-8A in the A-10.  And all the other gatling type guns
A friend of mine used to do field service for a company that made batch mixing equipment. One of his favorite clients was a munitions plant that made artillery shells and ammo for the Avenger cannon. He got to see them do a few QC test firings during his visits.

On one trip they took him to an artillery test range. They wrote his name on the projectile on a shell, loaded it into a gun, and fired it toward a test box with a high speed camera in it. When they pulled the photo you could clearly see his name on the projectile while it was still in flight. Their manufacturing processes were so tight, they knew exactly how many rotations that thing would make between the gun barrel and the camera, and loaded the shell into the gun accordingly.

He joked that he'd never die from a gunshot wound because the bullet with his name on it had already been fired.
"It's not the bullet with your name on it that you gotta worry about. It's them ten thousand others addressed to 'occupant.'"  - Larry Hama.
Love thou the rose, yet leave it on its stem. -- Edward Bulwer-Lytton
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Joined: July 12th, 2017, 12:19 am

April 6th, 2018, 5:13 pm #9

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Joined: October 8th, 2014, 2:05 pm

April 6th, 2018, 6:03 pm #10

Jelsemium wrote:"It's not the bullet with your name on it that you gotta worry about. It's them ten thousand others addressed to 'occupant.'"  - Larry Hama.
The same guy, a former Army grunt, was working in the same munitions plant when they had an "incident" - something went BANG on the assembly line. He dove for cover under a workbench. The people he was working with coaxed him out and said there wasn't any danger; the areas where that usually happened were all automated and nobody ever went there while it was live. They'd clean up the mess, fix or replace the machinery, and be back up and running in a day or two.

Then one of the foremen added this bit of wisdom: "If you heard the bang, it means your okay. You'll never hear the one that gets you."
If it ain't broke, I'll fix it!
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