The state is auctioning off some iron, are they worth it?

The state is auctioning off some iron, are they worth it?

63VDub
63VDub

February 2nd, 2012, 10:45 pm #1

One of the community colleges is flshing some of their inventory and I might pick up something(s) if they are worth the time.

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527702a.jpg

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527681a.jpg

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527690a.jpg
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Someone
Someone

February 2nd, 2012, 11:31 pm #2

Are you interested in completely rebuilding a CNC machine? If so, maybe, if not, forget it.
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Nighthawke
Nighthawke

February 2nd, 2012, 11:42 pm #3

One of the community colleges is flshing some of their inventory and I might pick up something(s) if they are worth the time.

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527702a.jpg

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527681a.jpg

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527690a.jpg
The machines are probably so worn out that you'd never get an accurate cut or grind.

Educational institutions are so rough on equipment that they are useless in half the normal operating time. I know this from the computer labs in my previous job. Those poor keyboards and mice were never built for such rough handling, and the laser jets? 5,000 pages in a month after setting one up. They burned through 5 bales of paper (25,000 sheets!) in 3 months time, absolutely incredible.

The administration tried printing 2 pages in booklet format on one sheet, that went over well with the teachers (hee hee, I TOLD them that they would gripe), setting up restricted copy numbers (also caught flak from the instructors), but they cheated and printed over and over again as a workaround. They finally put ALL copier paper under lock and key, restricting access to the supply room, and THAT irritated everyone. Talk about being open to ideas and open channels of communications... Oh well, win some, lose some. I'm glad I got out of that zoo.
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Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

February 3rd, 2012, 12:32 am #4

One of the community colleges is flshing some of their inventory and I might pick up something(s) if they are worth the time.

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527702a.jpg

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527681a.jpg

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527690a.jpg
The Compact 5 CNCs are kind of a workhorse teaching unit. They're small (as in work envelope) but bigger than most of the Taig or Sherline offerings. I don't know about the software, other than that there's several generations- the onboard computer, as those two seem to have, a more PC-like mated computer, and a PC-like standalone computer. The latter two, as I recall, take the old 5" floppies.

I've heard they're mechanically pretty good machines. Built well for their size, with decent drives and such. They were designed and built as training machines.

However, like any computer-controlled device, if you can't plug it in, boot it up, and actually run it before buying, you're taking a big chance. It may be 100% mechanically sound, but if some proprietary driver board is smoked, it might cost more than you paid for the machine to get a replacement.

The flip side of that is that Compact 5's are fairly common. Parts aren't what you'd call "abundant", but they're available, and not too horridly expensive.

The non-CNC lathes are parts. If you can get one for, say, $50 or less, and you can make sure you can find the tailstock, compound and all the carriage pieces, it might not be a bad little project to play with. They appear to be around the size and style of the common 9x20" Jet, Grizzly and Harbor Freight desktop lathes, though the photos are weirdly distorted so that's kind of a guess.

The other item (#4707) isn't a grinder, it's a Rusnok mini-mill (image from Lathes.co.uk)



If we correct Vee-Dub's distorted photos, we get this:



These are worth something. Hell, I want one of these. They're small machines, with a work envelope not much better- and in some cases, smaller- than the typical Sherline or Taig, but they're built considerably stouter. They're excellent tiny mills, and if in good shape, can do very precise work.

If there's any attendance to the auction at all, chances are these will go for $500 to $800 each. If you have the cash, and want or could use a small desktop type mill, go for it. Heck, if you could get 'em for $200-$300 each, buy as many as you can afford and resell the extras on eBay. For that price, I'd buy one and pay you to ship it up here.

Doc.
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63VDub
63VDub

February 3rd, 2012, 1:12 am #5

The mills (10 of them) have zero bids and start at $70. The Emco (just one) is $40, and the lathes are at $40 and there are 9 of them with only 2 having any bids. They all have 6+ days left before they end.

I'm planning on bidding on a mill at least, and maybe the Emco. If anyone else would like something, LMK.
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MephitMark
MephitMark

February 3rd, 2012, 8:03 am #6

One of the community colleges is flshing some of their inventory and I might pick up something(s) if they are worth the time.

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527702a.jpg

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527681a.jpg

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/images/90527690a.jpg
Looking through the listing of available items in the shop category I found one prize (to me at least). A Moore Jib Bore rig. Had the to train on one at school for the Tool & Die classes. Those are largely replace by the CNC mills now.

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/surplus. ... 8862295687

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/steps/mo ... m=90526890

From what I could see I would have to agree that these being from the schools, I'd agree that they are probably in ruff shape. Just how ruff is the question. They might be nice to a small hobby shop or such. Or as Nickel said for small precision work easier done then on a full sized mill.

Though I wonder if you'd find this recent addition to the Grizzly line you'd find functional Nickel.


http://www.grizzly.com/products/Mini-Ho ... Mill/G0727
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EVguru
EVguru

February 3rd, 2012, 9:30 am #7

The Compact 5 CNCs are kind of a workhorse teaching unit. They're small (as in work envelope) but bigger than most of the Taig or Sherline offerings. I don't know about the software, other than that there's several generations- the onboard computer, as those two seem to have, a more PC-like mated computer, and a PC-like standalone computer. The latter two, as I recall, take the old 5" floppies.

I've heard they're mechanically pretty good machines. Built well for their size, with decent drives and such. They were designed and built as training machines.

However, like any computer-controlled device, if you can't plug it in, boot it up, and actually run it before buying, you're taking a big chance. It may be 100% mechanically sound, but if some proprietary driver board is smoked, it might cost more than you paid for the machine to get a replacement.

The flip side of that is that Compact 5's are fairly common. Parts aren't what you'd call "abundant", but they're available, and not too horridly expensive.

The non-CNC lathes are parts. If you can get one for, say, $50 or less, and you can make sure you can find the tailstock, compound and all the carriage pieces, it might not be a bad little project to play with. They appear to be around the size and style of the common 9x20" Jet, Grizzly and Harbor Freight desktop lathes, though the photos are weirdly distorted so that's kind of a guess.

The other item (#4707) isn't a grinder, it's a Rusnok mini-mill (image from Lathes.co.uk)



If we correct Vee-Dub's distorted photos, we get this:



These are worth something. Hell, I want one of these. They're small machines, with a work envelope not much better- and in some cases, smaller- than the typical Sherline or Taig, but they're built considerably stouter. They're excellent tiny mills, and if in good shape, can do very precise work.

If there's any attendance to the auction at all, chances are these will go for $500 to $800 each. If you have the cash, and want or could use a small desktop type mill, go for it. Heck, if you could get 'em for $200-$300 each, buy as many as you can afford and resell the extras on eBay. For that price, I'd buy one and pay you to ship it up here.

Doc.
The manual lathes appear to be Emco Compact 8s. They look similar to the Tiwanese/Chinese 9 x 18 machines because those were copied from the Emco, often including all the bad features like no tumbler reverse, no camlock for the tailstock and a too high (100rpm) lowest speed.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/emco/page2.html

They were very well made and could be worth a punt at the right price.

Denford machine tools bought in kits of parts from Emco to build the Orac CNC training lathe.

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Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

February 3rd, 2012, 12:58 pm #8

Looking through the listing of available items in the shop category I found one prize (to me at least). A Moore Jib Bore rig. Had the to train on one at school for the Tool & Die classes. Those are largely replace by the CNC mills now.

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/surplus. ... 8862295687

https://www.arstatesurplus.com/steps/mo ... m=90526890

From what I could see I would have to agree that these being from the schools, I'd agree that they are probably in ruff shape. Just how ruff is the question. They might be nice to a small hobby shop or such. Or as Nickel said for small precision work easier done then on a full sized mill.

Though I wonder if you'd find this recent addition to the Grizzly line you'd find functional Nickel.


http://www.grizzly.com/products/Mini-Ho ... Mill/G0727
While jig bores are cool, and the Moore is- or was- the name in those machines here in America, few shops need or use them these days, and virtually no home shop machinist has a real need for one.

While you technically can do light milling on a jig bore, they're essentially fancy, accurate drill presses, set up to very accurately locate and drill/bore/ream precise holes in jigs and fixtures. They're designed to do so very accurately, because that jig or fixture is what gets set up on another machine to hold the actual workpieces for other processes. The more accurate the jig, the more accurate that other machine can do work.

But the days where a factory had large numbers of single-process machines, where a part would travel through dozens- if not hundreds- of individual machines, each taking a single cut or producing a single hole, are long past. And thus, with it, the need for large numbers of precision jigs or fixtures.

As for the little horizontal mill, I saw that when they first listed it for sale. It's a cute little thing, and kind of a clever design with the swappable motor/spindle unit, but I have no real interest in it. I sold my little Atlas horizontal because it was just too small, and if I wanted a teeny desktop vertical mill, I'd either shoot for a used Rusnok- for about the same price or a bit less- which has a far more useful top spindle speed (5,200 rpm vs 2,200 rpm) or spring for a larger Seig unit.

Doc.
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Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

February 3rd, 2012, 1:09 pm #9

The mills (10 of them) have zero bids and start at $70. The Emco (just one) is $40, and the lathes are at $40 and there are 9 of them with only 2 having any bids. They all have 6+ days left before they end.

I'm planning on bidding on a mill at least, and maybe the Emco. If anyone else would like something, LMK.
I see all the mills have a bid, and all by the same guy. Most likely, he's hoping to buy cheap to resell- Chances are they'll all sell, and I'd be surprised if they went for less than $300-$400 each, but he'd still be able to resell 'em, especially with a little cleanup, for $800+ each

That's still a good deal- you can buy 'em new, still, made in America and built as well as ever, but they cost something like $3,000+.

I'd also bet money he'll separate and sell the Palmgren vises individually too- they'll fetch about $80 to $100 each all by themselves.

If I were in the area- as in, I could inspect them directly- I'd be very much interested in one. But for the final cost and then shipping to get it up here, that's a little more risk than I'd like, to possibly wind up with the one with bad spindle bearings or a bent table screw.

Doc.
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B
B

February 3rd, 2012, 4:05 pm #10

The Compact 5 CNCs are kind of a workhorse teaching unit. They're small (as in work envelope) but bigger than most of the Taig or Sherline offerings. I don't know about the software, other than that there's several generations- the onboard computer, as those two seem to have, a more PC-like mated computer, and a PC-like standalone computer. The latter two, as I recall, take the old 5" floppies.

I've heard they're mechanically pretty good machines. Built well for their size, with decent drives and such. They were designed and built as training machines.

However, like any computer-controlled device, if you can't plug it in, boot it up, and actually run it before buying, you're taking a big chance. It may be 100% mechanically sound, but if some proprietary driver board is smoked, it might cost more than you paid for the machine to get a replacement.

The flip side of that is that Compact 5's are fairly common. Parts aren't what you'd call "abundant", but they're available, and not too horridly expensive.

The non-CNC lathes are parts. If you can get one for, say, $50 or less, and you can make sure you can find the tailstock, compound and all the carriage pieces, it might not be a bad little project to play with. They appear to be around the size and style of the common 9x20" Jet, Grizzly and Harbor Freight desktop lathes, though the photos are weirdly distorted so that's kind of a guess.

The other item (#4707) isn't a grinder, it's a Rusnok mini-mill (image from Lathes.co.uk)



If we correct Vee-Dub's distorted photos, we get this:



These are worth something. Hell, I want one of these. They're small machines, with a work envelope not much better- and in some cases, smaller- than the typical Sherline or Taig, but they're built considerably stouter. They're excellent tiny mills, and if in good shape, can do very precise work.

If there's any attendance to the auction at all, chances are these will go for $500 to $800 each. If you have the cash, and want or could use a small desktop type mill, go for it. Heck, if you could get 'em for $200-$300 each, buy as many as you can afford and resell the extras on eBay. For that price, I'd buy one and pay you to ship it up here.

Doc.
they are killer units only machines even close to comparison are made by the Swiss and Germans 1-1.5k is the street price for good used units they are almost 3k new now. These machines are used extensively for fine work such as medical, aerospace, optics most hooby guys would die for one especially the model makers since these machines can hold high tolerances
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