"The Fifty is awake again..."

"The Fifty is awake again..."

MarkF
MarkF

February 13th, 2012, 3:21 pm #1

And by "Fifty" I mean "Fifty-thousand ton closed die forging press"

From TheAtlantic.com:
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/arc ... iant/8886/

More info:
http://files.asme.org/asmeorg/communiti ... s/5488.pdf
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Stumpy
Stumpy

February 13th, 2012, 4:26 pm #2

Ha! I got a good chuckle out of that. Excellent read. Thanks
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Stumpy
Stumpy

February 13th, 2012, 4:58 pm #3

I'm sitting about 4 miles north of that press right now. I just finished reading the second article there. What a cool piece of machinery. I may have to swing a visit of that place as part of my degree here.

I did a visit of the Wiseco plant in Mentor and saw the 2000ton die forge they use for their pistons there and was impressed. I can't imagine what running this beast must be like.

Giant Waffle Iron heh
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tmk
tmk

February 13th, 2012, 8:25 pm #4

And by "Fifty" I mean "Fifty-thousand ton closed die forging press"

From TheAtlantic.com:
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/arc ... iant/8886/

More info:
http://files.asme.org/asmeorg/communiti ... s/5488.pdf
...the Fifty could bench-press the battleship Iowa, with 860 tons to spare."
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Webwolf
Webwolf

February 14th, 2012, 7:54 am #5

And by "Fifty" I mean "Fifty-thousand ton closed die forging press"

From TheAtlantic.com:
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/arc ... iant/8886/

More info:
http://files.asme.org/asmeorg/communiti ... s/5488.pdf
Seriously. Give me a big green button and a big red button, and I will gladly run that sucker for FREE. And then Alcoa would have to have me committed to a sanatarium, because I'd be giggling madly every time the die press comes down and squishes a piece of metal into shape. =D

Big toys!
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Salda007
Salda007

February 14th, 2012, 3:48 pm #6

I realize it would probably wreck whatever die was in the machine, and wouldn't actually form anything useful beyond art, but I'd love to see what happens when they throw a car in there as the metal to be forged (After taking out the glass and the other non-metallic bits, first, of course).
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sniper1rfa
sniper1rfa

February 14th, 2012, 8:08 pm #7

the machine is intended mostly for cold-working aluminum and magnesium.

Could be wrong though.
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Renegade_Azzy
Renegade_Azzy

February 14th, 2012, 8:14 pm #8

They heat the metal first to make it easier to flow. I bet the pressure alone gets the metal hot as well.
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Bruce Bergman
Bruce Bergman

February 14th, 2012, 9:42 pm #9

Aluminum won't force-forge well like that unless it's pre-heated, and the forging heats it the rest of the way. That's how they get the uniform grain structure, it makes the metal flow.

Unless you raise the speed to "Impact Forging" like making aluminum cans from coined blanks in a few milliseconds to get the heating effects.

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 15th, 2012, 11:47 am #10

And by "Fifty" I mean "Fifty-thousand ton closed die forging press"

From TheAtlantic.com:
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/arc ... iant/8886/

More info:
http://files.asme.org/asmeorg/communiti ... s/5488.pdf
A few years back, people were linking to a series of photos posted to, I think it was the Miller welder boards, that showed a crew repairing a very large drop-forge hammer.

It had cracked, deeply, and there were no longer any heavy steel plants in the United States that could make another. Ordering one from China was going to take years, so they decided to fix the one they had.

They arc-gouged out massive chunks of the hammer, like ten or twenty tons of steel, and then built it back up by arc welding. They used three (or more) giant power supplies, and used rods that were something like three feet long and 3/4" in diameter. The weld pool- the molten part- was almost a foot across.

The weldors worked in shifts, since standing next to the area they were welding was like standing in front of an open lava flow. Apparently they also melted the welding cables due to the constant current.

After welding, it was going to be sent off for heat-treating.

A quicky Google doesn't bring it up the thread, but I wonder if it's the same hammer? I seem to recall it was a quarter-million-pound block of steel, and that sounds like something you'd find in a press able to apply a hundred million pounds of force.

Doc.
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