Summer Project #7: PosiTraction, Completed!

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 4th, 2018, 5:00 am #11

Right! Let's get on with it!

First, we chock the front wheels, jack up the trailing end and throw a couple good, sturdy jackstands under there.



Then, start unboltin' stuff! The driveshaft, the control arm bolts, the shock absorbers, the turbo-encabulator....



Run the floor jack back under there, lower the axle out from under all the linkages, unceremoniously snip the old rubber brake hose with a bolt cutter, and roll that puppy outta there!



With the axle out of the way, remove the lower control arms, the shock absorbers and what's left of the brake line- and be frikkin' flabbergasted when the old brake line breaks loose and unscrews properly, with the nut actually turning on the tubing.



I'm not sure I've ever worked on a car and had that happen. I've lucked out and managed to break the nut loose with heat, Kroil and high-quality flare nut wrenches, but this one popped loose, without heat, without oil, and turned on the tube as neat as you please.

I'd say I need to go buy a friggin Lotto ticket or something, except both the rubber hose and the hardline are getting replaced, so... it's pretty much irrelevant how the two came apart. 😁

Next up, we slip the driveshaft out and run it up to the local 4WD and driveline specialty shop. As I'm using the THM350/10-bolt driveshaft on a 12-bolt, I have to get a "hybrid" universal joint- it's an off-the-shelf item, I'm hardly the first one to do this kind of thing. But I figured while I'm at it, I'll have the front U-joint swapped too, and maybe even spring for having it balanced. Neither joint was giving me any problem, but the car's almost 50 years old and has 75K miles on it- it's cheap insurance.



Longtime readers might remember back when I first resurrected this wreck back in 2012, that I had a bad gas leak first thing, towards the back. That turned out to be a dried-out-and-cracked fuel line at the tank, which I patched. Looking today, I see both of the vent lines are similarly cracking, so I'll pick up some fresh hose and swap 'em all before the axle goes back in.



Going through my short checklist of other things to do before I jam that badboy back in there, sharp-eyed viewers might have noticed up there during the paint sequence the big green tag that said this thing didn't have any gear lube in it.

So, while I was thinking about it, I poured in two containers of gear lube, and one tube of Posi additive. (A friction modifier specifically for clutch-type positractions like mine.)



But then, suddenly, we had a problem. I'd mentioned earlier how I'd incorrectly mounted the brake line fitting, and had found the bracket to mount it correctly.

Well, I'd taken that bracket, wire brushed it and spray-painted it. And today, as I was checking off the things to do, I tried mounting it. Oops.



It's hard to see in that picture, but the cast-in fins are in the way, and there's no antirotation hole for that "finger" on the right side. Plus, it moves the fitting over an inch to the side, meaning I'd have to re-run at least one side of the brake line if I wanted to use it.

However, I could see now that I can't use the brake line in the "straight up" configuration I had it. So, it was time to modify it. I nipped off the existing bolt tab and the antirotation finger, belt-sanded it smooth, soaked it in two coats of black (helped along by a heat gun) and plunked 'er in place.



I had just enough give in both the hard lines to reach, and still leave 'em enough clearance that nothing rubs. A couple stainless bolts finish off the mount and she's good to go.

What with a couple other things I had to get done today, that was about all I had time for- and tomorrow, the 4th, will involve a bit of partyin' and possibly some explosives, so I probably won't get much done then. Stand by. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 6th, 2018, 8:56 am #12

After a whole day wasted celebratin', eatin' and generally lazin' about, we're back to it.

As above, I found some dried-out-and-cracked hoses, so first up it was time to replace those. The clamped one is the actual suction line, all the others are basically vents.



And that meant, finally, that it was time to shanghai a nearby strong-back type, and with his assistance, roll the new axle under there and start hooking it all up.



With only moderate amounts of frustration, sweat and blood, and hardly more than half a dozen entirely new swear words involving the apparently rather convoluted mating habits of anyone even remotely associated with the development of the Hotchkiss drive, I got it wrestled into place and the four control arms connected...



And then got my shiny new 1"-lowering springs and the shocks all bolted into place, and tightened down in some semblance of a proper ride height.



Still have a few bits to do yet- the main one is the brake line, but there's the two parking brake cables and of course the driveshaft. (Very important. Can't forget the driveshaft. Fuel economy goes out the window if you leave the driveshaft off. Trust me. 😁 )

But, makin' progress!
Doc.
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Joined: August 3rd, 2015, 8:49 am

July 7th, 2018, 6:34 am #13

On the other hand, if you mount your driveshaft on the roof and attach a sail to it, fuel economy goes up exponentially!
Bridges, drive-through lanes, power lines, and most any overhead or overhang will become an issue though!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 7th, 2018, 8:34 am #14

That's absolutely correct.

It makes me want to unscrew your head a little bit, just to see what would happen, but you're correct. 😁

Anywho, today's late-afternoon tidbits include getting my freshly-rebalanced driveshaft bolted into place, along with a shiny new transmission tailshaft seal:



The driveline shop told me the balancing turned out to be a good idea, as it was out pretty significantly. You can see one of the weights they welded on there just ahead of the yoke.

And now we're down to the wire. Or more specifically, the brakes. First the parking brake cables, which is an easy task but in this case badly complicated by rusty fasteners. Once I got that sorted, everything just fell into place.

After that, the hydraulic brake line. Like the front half of the car, I'm switching to braided-stainless flex lines, and copper-nickel hardlines with stainless fittings. And in this case, I wanted to run one solid piece all the way from the proportioning valve right up to the inlet of the braided line on the rear axle.

I was going to have to make a few deviations from the factory tubing route because of that- the factory stuff is installed on the frame before the body is set down on it, and it would have been very tricky to weave it up there into place.

Anyway, I started by breaking out the Eastwood bench-mount flaring tool, left over from when I did the front brakes:



A great tool, by the way, and makes double flares easy as pie- but also really only works on the bench, mounted in a vise. Which means you need to be able to remove the entire line from wherever you're mounting it, in order to do at least the terminal flare.

But in this case, I removed the new steel line I'd installed earlier, when I did the front brakes, and used it to gin up a close copy on the end of the roll of cupro-nickel, so at least the proportioning valve end would be neat and easy to install.



You can see it doesn't take long for my workbench to get cluttered again. 😁

Once I ran the line down the frame rail and got most of it secured back into place with the factory clips, I had to break out the Rigid double-flare tool and cap off the line.



I was actually kind of surprised. In neither instance did I forget to first put the nut on. 😁

And finally, with a little hand-bending to get the tail end up and snugged into the flexy line end, the whole job is pretty much done!



Okay, control arms are in and tightened, both new shocks are in and tightened, the driveshaft has been balanced, the trans given a new seal, and the shaft installed and tightened. I have two quarts of gear oil in there along with the friction modifier additive, there's new U-joints at each end on the driveshaft, the parking brake is hooked up, and the hydraulic line is run, mounted and tight at both ends.



All I have to do now is bleed the brakes in the morning.

But for some reason I keep thinking I'm forgetting something...

Doc.
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Joined: March 8th, 2004, 11:48 pm

July 7th, 2018, 9:41 am #15

DocsMachine wrote: But for some reason I keep thinking I'm forgetting something...

Doc.
The back wheels? The moose in the trunk? Preparation for the cowpocalypse? 
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Joined: October 8th, 2014, 2:05 pm

July 7th, 2018, 1:48 pm #16

DocsMachine wrote: But for some reason I keep thinking I'm forgetting something...
Don't forget to close the hood. You won't be able to see out if you don't.

Besides bleeding the brakes and putting things back where they belong, what other work do you have planned for the car?
If it ain't broke, I'll fix it!
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Joined: November 30th, 2014, 1:36 am

July 7th, 2018, 4:33 pm #17

DocsMachine wrote: But for some reason I keep thinking I'm forgetting something...

Doc.
Did you remember to properly defenestrate the turboencabulator you removed earlier?
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Joined: January 4th, 2016, 11:46 pm

July 7th, 2018, 7:48 pm #18

did you polish the dilithuim matrix and re-calibrate the flux capacitor? oh and fit the Mr Fusion?
Explosion - from the Latin, 'oh my god, my eyebrows'
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Joined: September 16th, 2014, 7:01 am

July 7th, 2018, 8:24 pm #19

And NO, you can't have my Mr. Fusion - I've got plans for it...  Might even hunt down a set of brushes so it can be used to grind coffee beans too.
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Joined: January 4th, 2016, 11:46 pm

July 7th, 2018, 8:59 pm #20

Okok. It's the ZPM then......
Explosion - from the Latin, 'oh my god, my eyebrows'
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