Joined: October 9th, 2014, 8:58 pm

June 6th, 2018, 2:19 am #11

I'm planning on building myself a belt grinder this summer, I'd ask if you want to sell that frame, but I fear that shipping would price it to high to be worthwhile.
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Joined: September 16th, 2014, 7:01 am

June 6th, 2018, 11:53 pm #12

You only don't need it right now - the work will show up for it again.
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Joined: June 28th, 2017, 11:03 pm

June 7th, 2018, 5:05 am #13

BruceBergman wrote: You only don't need it right now - the work will show up for it again.
Well, Doc DID say he lucked into a complete grinder of this style that only needed a few minor tweaks to make usable...
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 8th, 2018, 9:29 pm #14

BruceBergman wrote:You only don't need it right now - the work will show up for it again.
-You misunderstand: I "don't need it anymore" because I bought another, more complete one. 😁

And on that note, I made a deal with a buddy of mine, who will buy the homebrew unit, but I have to finish it first. So this project is still ongoing, it's just lost a bit of that urgency. 😋

Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 20th, 2018, 7:39 am #15

Bringing this one back up for the moment, I'd ordered a VFD for this grinder, somewhat ironically shortly before finding the new grinder, and it came in a few days after bought the other one.

It's a sealed housing, actually washdown-tight, which is commonly used for this kind of grinder, in order to keep dust- potentially conductive dust- out of the electronics. As such, I wanted some dust-tight cable connectors, and had to order some, as nothing like these were available here in town.



I got the ends properly terminated and everything solidly connected.

I then opened up the Baldor motor, which was basically new-old-stock, having been on a shelf at the local oil refinery for probably 20 years, before they threw it away for being the wrong voltage. And then I've had it for nearly a decade myself, and this is likely the first time it's been connected to anything since it was tested at the factory.

How'd it do? Runs like a champ, smooth and quiet, and I even got the wiring right the first time so it turns the correct direction. You can't tell, but it's turning in this photo. :D



So I then checked my stash, found a belt of about the right size, slipped it on, and turned the grinder itself for the first time ever:



And it, too, worked great! The motor, of course, is not bolted to anything, so I had to hold it im place while it was running- and i couldn't do that and get a picture, so no, it's not running in that photo. :)

But now I have to figure out how to properly mount that motor. I have a couple of ideas, including one that will be kind of a 'radical departure' change, but at the moment, this machine has dropped a bit in priority, and I need to noodle the mods a bit more before I start cutting.

Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 26th, 2018, 6:28 am #16

And mark another one down as completed! 😁

Finally getting back to this one, that crappy spring arrangement for the tensioner arm always kinda bugged me. Yeah, this is all a bit of a slapdash build, but that was cheesy even for this monstrosity.

The new Wilmont, however, offered a more elegant solution, so I figured I'd implement it on this build. To that end, I found another chunk of the bar stock and made a longer copy of the tensioner arm.



And, in the interests of making the whole thing look at least a little more professionally built, I mounted up the rotary table and milled the handle end of the bar nice and round.



Then, flipping around the opposite end, I milled just the one corner round to the same radius.



Switching back to the standard vise, I milled a couple pockets on each side of the last corner...



And then drilled and countersunk a hole in the center of the pocket.



I found a suitable extension spring in amongst my stashes o' parts, and nipped a ring from a chunk of old chain from yet another stash, and welded it on.



Et Voila`! (Which I'm pretty sure is French for "Hey, a violin!" 😁 )



That looks a LOT better than the previous version, in my opinion.

After that, we just needed to mount the motor and VFD. And, here I have to admit to a smidgen of simple greed. I wanted to keep the Baldor motor, as it's a brand-new, top-of-the-line name brand unit with a 7/8" output shaft, while the motor on the new Wilmont grinder was a non-name Chinese-made unit with a 5/8" output shaft. Both were 2HP and basically new, so thankfully, as they both had face-mount flanges, it was a simple matter to just unbolt one and remount the other.



And yes, the guy I'm selling this one to knows I'm making the swap, and has no problems with the deal. I'm not that much of a jerk. 😁 In any case, it also solved my motor mounting issue: The Baldors "footprint" hung over the edge of the machine's baseplate. I was going to have to make a sub-plate, both to fit the motor, and to add slots to the belt could be tensioned. The Chinese motor, on the other hand, had a narrower "foot" and already-slotted mounting holes.

Therefore I was able to drill the existing baseplate, cut and trim four 5/16" studs, and TIG weld them into place:



That lets me mount the motor directly and has built in-adjustment to tension the belt. Four stainless washers and nuts and she has her own complete drive for the first time ever! 😁



Finally, we just need to mount the VFD. I found a section of 1x2" box tubing that was just about the exact size I needed, drilled and tapped four mounting holes for the control box in it, and then, after a quick test-fit, milled the bottom edge at about whatever that angle is.



Welded in place, with a second bar for a bit of triangulation...



Get the VFD mounted and wired...



And Done! 😁



I still need to add a T-handle to the bolt that clamps the arm in place, but apart from that, it's complete and ready to use!



Does it work? 'Course it works!



Works like a champ, really. Tracks nice and straight, runs very smoothly and surprisingly quietly, and seems to have plenty of power, even though that particular belt is pretty well worn out. I'll throw in a couple new ones for the buyer, and I think he'll be really happy with it!

Doc.
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Joined: June 28th, 2017, 11:03 pm

August 26th, 2018, 7:33 am #17

Just to channel Cliff Clavin for a moment, 'Et voilà' does in fact mean 'Hey, check this out!' (literal translation: And see there)

Anyway, nice to see you've marked another project off as (substantially) Complete. :) What's next?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 26th, 2018, 8:18 am #18

Well, let's see. This marks the fifth "official" project completed, and the three machine tools are on hold, likely for maybe as much as the next two months.
That makes eight. The desk project is also on hold- I neither have the time, or thanks to the SNAFU with the machines, the money to start up another project like that at the moment. I figure that setup will cost me an easy $500-$800, not counting the monitors, which could be another $1,700 if I go overboard on the fancy ones I want.

Anything I might have had to spare for that got ate up in the airsystem, and at this point, anything left over has to be marshalled for the machine shipping, so we gotta mark that one as delayed.

Number ten is the CNC lathe, which I'll be getting back to shortly, but I kind of set aside as an indoor/rainy season project- too much to do outside, while the sun was shining. 😁

That leaves the DRO and the bandsaw. I'll be working on those as much as possible this coming week. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 28th, 2018, 6:50 am #19

Last little bit before it got sent off to its new home: I had a plain 1/2" bolt used to lock the tool arm in place. Functional, but this kind of thing works a lot better if you can just grab the lock and twist, rather than having to get a wrench out.

So I turned the grade markings off the top, found a chunk of 5/16" cold-rolled in my bin, lopped about 4" off and rounded the ends, then TIGged the two together:



And that goes in place like so:



Simple, easy and quick, and of course functional. Maybe not the fanciest thing in the world, but the new owner is very happy with it and looking forward to trying it out. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: March 8th, 2004, 11:48 pm

August 28th, 2018, 2:42 pm #20

You didn't grind the sides of the hex head down? He might get a boo-boo and sue you.
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