Summer Project #4: I Saw That!

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 15th, 2018, 10:59 pm #1

Of course, because I have brain damage or something, today I threw a fourth fairly major project on top of this whole dumpster fire. Long time readers will recall I have an older Wells horizontal bandsaw. It's been a handy machine over the years, but like most of the machines I get, I wasn't happy with the paint, and despite the machine being fully working, there were small aspects I wanted to fix, upgrade or otherwise attend to.

So, about 2:00 this afternoon...



And by 2:45...



In this case, I'm not biting off TOO big a chunk, because about 80% of this will just be stripping the multiple layers of old paint, and repriming and repainting anew.The only actual repair/upgrade work, apart from the occasional buggered screw or cracked bracket, is that I'd like to add a 'drip tray' in case I ever desire to add coolant, and I'll be swapping the straight 3-phase control (I run it on my phase converter) with a 1HP VFD, so that it can run on standard 220V. (Or possibly even 110V, as you can now get 1HP 110V-in VFDs, that give you 220V/3-phase out.)

But, like many other things, it's a project I've been wanting to do for years now, so might as well jump at it.

Doc.

(Reprinted from the original thread.)
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 15th, 2018, 11:00 pm #2

One of the fun things when tearing apart these old machines, is seeing how many times they'd been repainted.

... Okay, for weird definitions of "fun", but hey.

The Springfield had been painted four times, all slightly different shades of grey. This saw, as I was carefully chemically stripping the legs today, also had four, including the original:



I also found where some now-illegible instructions had been written on the crossbar in permanent marker. Couldn't read 'em, but it looked like a line marking the max width to move the blade-guide arms, with some legend describing it as such.

Not quite as good as the chip I saw at a paint-and-body shop once. Had been peeled off the hood of a car, and when examined under good magnification, you were able to count something like 13 to 15 layers of paint (which included primers.) Meaning the car had been repainted something like seven times, and a different color each time. The car had been blue, red, white and green at different times, and a couple different shades of each.

Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 15th, 2018, 11:00 pm #3

I spared a few minutes today getting some of the newly-liberated parts ready for paint:



I stripped the bulk of the gunk chemically, rinsed them off with the pressure washer, and used razor blades, wire brushes and Scotchbrite pads in air grinders to buzz off the rest. They didn't need to be 100% stripped, this isn't a show car and the old paints were actually adhering pretty well, but really, it's easier to  take all the paint off than it is to sand it all smooth, given the chips and flakes.

Anyway, with the paint off, a wild crack appears!



Obviously not a particularly huge issue, as it was hiding under at least one coat of paint- a coat that was probably ten years old when I got the saw, and I've had it over ten years myself- but this is of course the ideal time to fix it.

So, the first step, will all cracks like this, is first to stop-drill it...



Groove it out nicely with a cutoff wheel and then a die grinder with a carbide "tree" rotary file...



Preheat it slightly with a couple propane torches, 'cause it's still only about 45 degrees out there (hey, Alaska :green: ) and carefully weld it up with some "Muggy" cast-iron welding rod:



Let it slowly cool, then get the air tools back out and grind it back to flush. Or as the Project Binky guys say, "linish it into shape". :green:



The other pair of legs had already been broken and welded at some point in history, at least two paint jobs ago. The welds aren't great- I'm pretty sure somebody tried using just standard 6011 or other mild steel rod on it- but they appear solid. I'll grind those down too, check for cracks, and wire brush the gooblies off in preparation for paint.

Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 15th, 2018, 11:01 pm #4

Got a last-minute customer job done quicker than expected, so since I still hadn't put all the air tools away, I cleaned up the ugly welds on the other leg-frame:



They're not the best welds- basically it looks like the guy had to keep piling on and grinding out welds 'til the carbon content got low enough to finally hold.

I didn't see any cracks as I dressed 'em down, and they've held this long, so I saw no reason to grind or cut them out- especially if I was going to have to replace 'em with that $10-a-stick Muggy rod.

But, with a little patience and some power tools I got 'em dressed down nicely:



I didn't bother cleaning up the inside much, but that's generally not as visible.

Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 16th, 2018, 4:56 am #5

-Paint!

Stripped n' sanded:



And painted!



Like I said, there's not much to actually do to this thing apart from strip, clean and paint, but of course painting takes days because this industrial enamel takes several coats and dries slow. But, on the other hand, I have plenty of other things to do in the meantime... like, y'know, clean up the shop, which is a freakin' wreck. 😁

But I just put the second coat on the legs...



You can see how smooth that weld came out.



And one of the few actual mods I wanted to do to this thing. The saw came on a rolling 'cart' or base that had been made for it at some point in its industrial life. It's pretty handy, letting you move the thing around without needing a freakin' forklift or something.

But they'd left it hollow in the center. That was too tempting a place to put cut-offs and leftover bar-stock, but of course after enough of it piles up, the saw is no longer easily movable. So I had the local metal shop shear me a chunk of 1/4" plate that exactly fit the hole and welded it in:



I'd have much preferred to do a "sunken" tray, but I don't have a brake that can do metal that thick, the local guy with a big press brake than can would have charged me $200 for the job, and anything else would have been a pile of cobbling and welds. I don't "need" it as storage, so I'm not overly worried about it. Technically I shouldn't be storing much under there anyway- I wind up spreading my stock around, can't find a piece, go buy more, and then find out I had two feet back in a corner somewhere. 😁

Anyway, I'll need to give the base a second coat in the morning, and once everything is well and truly dry/cured (Friday or Saturday) I can assemble the base, legs and table, and start assembling the rest of the saw back onto that framework.

Doc.
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

May 17th, 2018, 11:43 am #6

You should just keep slapping new paint over the old stuff.  Fordite's starting to get collectible.  It'd be a great investment. 😁
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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Joined: September 29th, 2016, 1:55 am

May 17th, 2018, 6:20 pm #7

I was just thinking of Fordite.  Actually, dunno if it's the color tuning on my screen, but all those layers of paint were more Frigidaire green than gray.  Maybe an old GM castoff from one of their in-house shops?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 25th, 2018, 5:05 am #8

About a week ago, I got the frame painted and assembled...



And since then, as I've had time, I stripped a few of the parts, painted them, and made a couple of repair pieces. Today, as the paint on several of them had finally dried, I got the vise adjuster and handwheel assembled...



And made a new heavy-duty stud for the fixed jaw of the vise:



I'm not sure what it was supposed to have originally, but when I got it, the two bolts on the fixed jaw were two different sizes, one of which had a head different from the nut size. Which meant I needed three different size wrenches to adjust the jaw. (It angles so you can cut a miter joint.)

Besides that, you had to reach under the machine and put a wrench on the underside- not the most difficult thing in the world, but not really convenient either.The pivot now has a stud with a T-nut, so it can be loosened from the top with a single wrench. I'm planning something similar for the other bolt or stud, so you can loosen both fasteners with a single wrench, and all from the top.

Doc.
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Joined: September 16th, 2014, 7:01 am

May 26th, 2018, 12:18 am #9

And you need to make a little clamp holder so that one fence angle adjuster wrench is right there ready to grab.  Or a hook for a box combo wrench. 
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 26th, 2018, 5:04 am #10

I was thinking about something like that. There's several threaded holes left in the chassis where the old control box or other fittings were, and it'd be easy to use one or two of them to mount a small tool rack or even just a hook for a single wrench.

And if anyone's interested, I have the first three pages of the saw build up on the Machine Builds Page, at the bottom. I also moved the KMG build there, as that'll be a multiple-page article, and didn't fit in well on the "shop stuff" page.

Doc.
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