Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

4:13 AM - Jul 17, 2018 #11

Over the weekend I spent a bit of time back on this project, which unsurprisingly has wound up sitting longer than I'd intended it to. 🙄

All I'd really managed to get done since the last shot was mount the outfeed table.



But, over the weekend, while I was doing other little bits, I got some of the other parts cleaned up, stripped of paint, and in some cases repainted. No real pics, it's the typical boring stuff.

I also decided to tackle the motor, which ran fine, though the bearings I think whirred a bit more than they should, and I wanted to "re-clock" the body, so the air intake bell wasn't pointing straight up.



First, pull the pulley (which may be bent)



And check out the output shaft of the motor (which could also be bent.)



I'll have to inspect said shaft a bit closer as it looks kind of bad. I think somebody may have filed it back to round after a crash, and ti may be both bent and eccentric.

But, for the moment, we then take the body bolts out...



And spend most of the next two hours tapping, rapping and prying 'til I can get the endbell far enough out to puyt the gear puller on it.



And... that's about all I had time for. 😁



Next up, I'll need to see if i can get the ID tag off, and wire brush off most of the old paint.

Doc.
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

2:42 AM - Jul 31, 2018 #12

Dredging this old thread back up, I have been working on it in drips and drabs, and haven't really taken the time to seriously focus on it so it's going a bit slow.

After I fixed the worn motor shaft a week or so ago, I kinda set it aside for a bit while I worked on other things.

I got some of the smaller parts painted...



Got the main support arch stripped...



and then painted...



And finally moved back to the motor, since it was laying in pieces on my bench and I needed it gone. I'd ordered some new bearings and they had arrived, so the rest of the motor only needed to have the old orange paint stripped and some new plaint applied.

In order to do that, like usual I needed to get the ID plate rivets off. These proved resistant to my usual trick of a sharp chisel to pop them loose, and also didn't take well to the old trick of Dremmeling a slot in the head and trying to twist them out.



The rivets have a fast spiral shank, and can under the right conditions be "unscrewed". These, however, weren't cooperating.

So it was time to get out the heavy artillery. I drilled and chamfered a 1/2" hole in both ends of a short chunk of scrap strap iron...



Laid it over the head of the rivet...



And then gave it a very light and quick tack weld.



Using the bar as a lever, the rivet could then be unscrewed.



Et voila`! The plate got a bit scorched, but it's not exactly in top shape to start with.



Repeat on the other one, and the tag is off, ready to be straightened, cleaned and reused. As usual, I'll be reattaching it with small button-head allen screws, in this case probably 6-32.



After that, a couple wire brushes and a portable sandblaster gun took care of the paint...



And two hours fabricating a custom wrench finally got the junction box off the side of the stator housing so I could clean it, too.



After that, the usual self-etching primer...



And two coats of my patented Machine Grey enamel.



As soon as the paint's dry and I have a few minutes to kill, I'll throw 'er back together and get it mounted up!

Doc.
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

5:35 AM - Sep 23, 2018 #13

Right! My two-month coffee break is over, and finally time to get back to work! 😆

After dismantling the motor, there was of course the repair to the shaft as documented elsewhere, a fix that just needed the keyway recut to finish it off.

I finally had a minute to get it chucked up and cut the slot. I had to do it between centers with the indexer, as I wanted to be able to use a keyway or Woodruff cutter, rather than an endmill. The tapered end to a Woodruff-cut slot reduces the "stress riser" aspect of the keyway slot- probably not a huge issue on this relatively lightly stressed and low power motor, but I think it was worth the effort.



With that done and deburred, I then pressed on the new bearings (and then pulled one of them back off to put the spacer on, then pressed the bearing back on. 😋 )



Set the rotor into the housing...



Seat the endbell back in place, trying to hopefully 'clock' the mounting arm at the right angle...



And install the four studs that hold everything together, with a set of shiny new stainless acorn nuts, just 'cause I can. 😁



Slide the pulley in place, slip the key in, tighten it down, give 'er a test spin. Looks good so far.



Now, one thing that annoyed me about this saw was the fact that, because it was 3-phase, I had to hook it up to the rotary converter in order to use it. Not a huge thing, but still kind of a little extra hassle at times. I'd elected to go that route all those years ago, because VFDs were- and still are- fairly expensive, and I needed a rotary converter for the surface grinder anyway. One $250 rotary converter setup beat buying four $200 VFDs (one for the saw, and three for the grinder- spindle, vacuum and coolant pump.)

Today, VFDs aren't much cheaper than they were, but for this project, I was willing to spend the money to make the machine more usable and portable- that is, I can now run it out front onto the apron, without having to buy $100 worth of extra cable for the 3-phase cord.)

I'd still originally planned to get a typical AutomationDirect 1HP unit, which would have been cheaper, but I was really happy with the build quality and documentation of the enclosed KB drives such as came on the Wilmont grinder, and I installed on my homebuilt grinder. So I spent a little more on a 1HP version for the Wellsaw.



This one didn't come with a power switch, but the case has a hole made for one, so I dug through my parts bins and found one with one of those cool military safety covers. 😁



Several weeks ago, I was at that local secondhand shop and had lucked upon a 10' replacement power tool cord- basically an extension cord but with only the male end. It was ideal for this project, and being a secondhand place, cost me a whopping $2.99. 😋



What I don't have is enough 4-conductor cable to go from the drive to the motor, nor do I know how long I need it, as I'm not yet 100% sure exactly where I'm even going to mount the box. I did have a short section to spare, though, so I threw that in temporarily to get the freshly-kitten-licked motor a proper test:



Hard to tell, but yep, she's turnin' in that pic, smoothly and quietly, and the speed control works like a champ.

I'll have to order a loop of new cable, but no rush, I still have some work to do before the whole saw is up and ready. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: 11:09 AM - Nov 17, 2014

1:03 PM - Sep 23, 2018 #14

About the fixed jaw...  
It shouldn't have handles instead of just flanged nuts?
You can probably knock something together in a moment, by welding rods onto some nuts, or do the usual flair...  
(Shape a handle in the lathe, basically a bar with a round knob at each end, flatten off one of the knobs in the mill, then drill and tap a hole.  )
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

5:27 PM - Sep 23, 2018 #15

Due to how close the nuts are to the jaw face- at least the fixed pivot- the "arm" of a handled nut wouldn't be able to be very long, and thus wouldn't be able to be tightened that well. I could do a sliding arm, like the handle of a bench vise, but in this case there's nothing wrong with having to use a wrench.

As suggested earlier, there's plenty of spare holes in the chassis, I'll whip up a small rack for the two or three wrenches commonly needed for the machine, and probably puck up a set of cheap off-brands from the local secondhand store to leave with it. Maybe do something like wrap the handles with colored electrical tape to mark them as needing to stay with it.

If I was going to be regularly using the saw to cut, like, roll cage tubing, or other odd angles all the time, yeah, I'd probably come up with a quicker system to adjust the angles. But considering that this machine is predominantly used to cut off material that is then going into one of the machine tools, basically 99% of the time all I need is a standard 90 degree cut.

Doc.
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

5:34 AM - Sep 25, 2018 #16

Y'allrighty. With the motor and power supply sorted, and some new cable ordered, about the only things left to do are the guide arms and the drive wheels.

The guide arms were looking a bit shabby...



So they were next up on the docket. I'd been using the saw for a couple of years before discovering that the arms were on backwards- or at least somebody had moved the blade brush from the rear arm, where it's supposed to be, to the front arm.



But that'll be an easy fix. The old brushes are, as they say, rather perished- they were long since gone to meet their maker when I got the saw, and I've had it ten years now. 😁 I have some coarse plastic-fiber brushes that came off one of those treadmills I dismantled years ago, and I can cut each one into short sections. That'll give me plenty of brushes to last many years on this badboy.

Each guide-roller assembly has two sets of setscrew adjusters, one for the roller assembly itself, and one for the plate the assembly bolts to.



I'm still checking, but I think the plate adjustment is for basic in-out, to line up the arm with the blade, while the roller plate is of course to true the blade to be square to the axis of the cut.

And, of course, one thing I noticed early on when trying to adjust the blade years ago, but never got around to fixing:



Gods know what kind of crash they had to pop that thing off, but I guess I'll have to figure out some way to fix it.

A few more minutes got the rest disassembled, and it was time to start cleaning. The roller adjusters and some other bits were heavily caked with dried oil or coolant, so the little jar has some solvent, and I'm letting them soak for a day or two.



Now, the one thing that's always bugged me about this machine, is this: One of the guide arms had been snapped off at the top clamp at some point, and badly rewelded.



I'm not yet sure exactly what I want to do with it yet. It seemed to be holding, although it looks like a crack in the lower weld, coming off the left side (down from about 10:00 on the weld) so it may at least need a grind-out and re-reweld.

Of course, it's also both MIG and stick weld (you can see a bit of MIG wire at that bottom lump) which means it was welded, broken, and welded again- OR, the stick wasn't holding and they piled some MIG on it, or vice-versa.

I'll at least clean up the welds, of course, and may have to grind out and redo some of it. Going over the old weld shouldn't be too much of a problem, my question is, I'd like to reinforce it, and that means welding to some of the unmolested cast iron. I have the Muggy rod, but I'm not yet entirely sure how well that goes between mild steel and the cast. I seem to recall it's supposed to do just fine, but I might have to experiment first.

Oh, and those thumbscrews, besides being the wrong ones (I'm sure the originals with the Bakelite handles were destroyed years ago) apparently enough big-bruiser types had used this saw often enough that the ends of the screws were actually peened down- the screw was too fat to be removed from the hole.

So I had to wind 'em in all the way, cinch 'em both in place, and bandsaw off about a quarter of an inch of the end.



I'll make replacements for them both, something with a little more leverage than those thumb screws- I may try and come up with a little "pad" for the end, too, though I'm not sure how I might do that. Maybe just a small thick disc with a dimple ball-milled into the middle, and a matching radius turned into the screw.

I'll figure it out. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: 10:51 PM - Oct 24, 2014

9:58 AM - Sep 25, 2018 #17

This is what happens when you use pliers on the thumbscrew, because "I couldn't get it tight enough otherwise"...

*head->desk*
*head->desk*
*head->desk*
*head->desk*
*head->desk*
*head->desk*

~>X[
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Joined: 2:06 PM - Oct 08, 2014

4:31 AM - Sep 26, 2018 #18

Two pictures with newspaper backgrounds saying sausage and onions over a picture of a wiener. Now I'm hungry.
This is a test. Explosions are a happy side effect.
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

4:24 AM - Sep 27, 2018 #19

Real quick one today, didn't have a whole lot of free time.

One of the things I wanted to change on this saw was the handle you hold while raising or lowering the saw. Looking back at the first picture in this series...



You can see it's on the upper half of the saw body. I never really liked that, and tended to grab the housing at about the 7:00 position. That is, of course, kind of dangerous if the blade is still running, as there's no guard on the underside. I wanted to rotate the original handle down to about the same place on the lower half of the curve, which I think will be a better spot for it.

Of course, as it turns out, at some point during the disassembly and subsequent moving of the debris around the shop a dozen times to accommodate other projects, I managed to break it.



Well, a little hassle, sure, but nothing fatal. A quick trip to the sandblaster gets all the old paint off, a pass through the bench grinder notches the break nicely, and bolting it all back to the body of the saw makes for a perfect jig to hold it all in alignment.



After that, I just welded it back up with some Muggy rod, let 'er cool, and brushed it off.



The belt grinder made short work of smoothing down the weld bead and restoring the profile...



With the only hiccup in the process being when I had to pull the 2" rubber contact wheel from the square-wheel fixture, and put it on the tool arm in place of the 10" wheel in order to do the inside curve.



After that, I found a likely new spot for the handle, drilled and tapped a couple holes...



Test-fitted it...



And gave it a coat of safety red.



Why red? Well, the original colors for this machine were either tan or later, green, with the controls and other important bits, like the blade guides, in yellow. Well, we all know I'm not all that big on restoring with original colors 😁 and the green they used was godawful, but I did like the idea of the controls being a contrasting color.

So this handle, the locking knob for the sliding weight, the vise handwheel, and the lower parts of the blade guides, will be red, with the rest grey.

Doc.
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Joined: 7:01 AM - Sep 16, 2014

5:23 AM - Sep 27, 2018 #20

You are aware all the pictures are missing...?
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