Joined: November 8th, 2017, 3:33 am

July 5th, 2018, 2:04 pm #51

Just don't use Gallium on Aluminum.  Or use it, if you want to destroy a lock. 
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 26th, 2018, 8:21 am #52

Okay, bringing the topic back around to, you know, the topic of the bloody thread I finally had the chance to add a bit more line.

The delay was from a couple things, partly other stuff to be done, and partly I needed to clear some junk out of the way so I had ladder access to that corner of the shop. I finally managed to get that last bit of fluff sorted out over the weekend and over the last few days- it's not "done", by whatever definition of the word you might want to use, but it's organized and was clear enough to get up there with a ladder.

Again, I didn't get many photos, because it'd just be pictures of a blank white wall with some black pipe clips on it.

BUT... just to run this one length of tubing, I had to finish hanging the last of the replacement LED shoplights, partially dismantle the vent fan- at least the cage- I finally got around to painting some wall panels that no one had ever painted, run some string levels by myself (to make sure the pipe always runs slightly uphill or slightly downhill for drainage) and do it all up near the ceiling, and partly across a cluttered and dusty shelf.

Anyway, the first two drops which were connected previously, are now connected to the third:



The next step will be to run further to the right, dogleg twice, and run through the wall into the machine room. I'm hoping I can get a conduit bender and see if I can't put a fairly sharp, relatively small-radius bend into this stuff without kinking it.

Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 6th, 2018, 8:43 am #53

Well, this weekend was a bit of a circus, but earlier this week I'd gotten in some more parts so I was able to squeeze in a few more minutes on this particular project.

The main thing I'd ordered were some 'reducer tees', that go in the 3/4" line and have a 1/2" leg. That'll let me run the 1/2" drops more easily, as I'd originally expected that I was going to have to mill custom junction blocks.

As I'd managed to get the pipe extended from the above photo, and run successfully through the wall, with the new tees I was able to finally start running the span across the ceiling of the machine room. The actual drops are going to be tricky- one I'm going to try and run entirely behind my workbench so I have a dedicated air port right there.

I'm toying with something like this:



So it can be bolted right to the front face of my bench, with the connecting tubing concealed behind.

Still kinda designing. 😁

Also, I already made one change: Over in the main shop, the drop in between the garage doors was originally a single outlet block. As I was looking for the reducer tee, I saw these dual outlet kits and decided to swap one in instead.



This kind of centrally located outlet will likely get the bulk of the overall use- especially any time I'm working on a project outside. I figured it sure couldn't hurt to be able to run two air tools... well, maybe not simultaneously, but at least having to do a lot less disconnect/reconnecting to switch tools.

Doc.
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Joined: November 17th, 2014, 11:09 am

August 6th, 2018, 9:00 am #54

Nice. 
It never hurts to have the extra outlet.
Sure, you're probably not going to be using the sander and the paint gun directly after each other, and if you're swapping from grinder to sander while battling rust, you can just swap at the end of the hose, but still...   
(And if you have two tools with separate hoses, near each other, you know they'll end up tangled in each other)
but odds are that if you didn't put up a double, you'd end up needing it pretty soon. 
It's just one of those things with tools...
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Joined: September 16th, 2014, 7:01 am

August 7th, 2018, 10:13 pm #55

And for the drop between the doors, you can sneak in a 50' Air Hose Reel and tap off one of the side ports to run it.  Put an inline shutoff in case the reel hose pops.   If the eaves are deep enough to protect it you can put it on the outside. 
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 7th, 2018, 10:49 pm #56

I'd briefly considered plumbing one in earlier, but actually I hate hose reels. I suppose I might tolerate one if I spent a bundle and bought a high-end industrial unit, but all the "home shop" grade ones I've used, either leaked badly from the rotating thimble, never latched properly, never retracted properly, or all three.

And no, no hose connections outside. 😁 Especially not a reel. Even if we could get the seals to survive at 20 below (they don't, trust me) the hose would be about as flexible as a 2x4. And, it's all too common for any moisture in the system to freeze and stick a QD end open.

The common trick I've seen is to have a port in the wall- literally a hole with a cover or door or something, that you just thread a regular hose through, if you're going to need it outside in the cold for any length of time. Me, I usually just lift one of the garage doors slightly, loop the hose under it, and close it again.

Doc.
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Joined: June 28th, 2017, 11:03 pm

August 8th, 2018, 5:21 am #57

Not to hijack this thread, but the previous owner of my house installed such a 'port' in the outside wall of the garage, which is more or less a 2" PVC fitting with a threaded plug that screws in. I haven't examined it closely enough yet to see how it was anchored in place, but there you go. I guess he preferred that solution over Doc's method.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 8th, 2018, 5:41 am #58

Anybody use an actual desiccant-type compressed air dryer? A buddy gave me this old Camair TS-10...



Which has a kind of mechanical separator on the left, what's called a "coalescing filter" in the pot at the bottom, and near as I can figure about 10 pounds of silica gel desiccant in the big chamber on the right.

I'm kind of wondering how long that ten pounds might last. I can get a "refresh kit" which comes with a new filter, a new sight glass which acts as a "moisture indicator" (presumably telling me when the fill needs to be changed) and ten pounds of fresh silica gel. The only problem being that kit costs about $150, and being in Alaska, after UPS and a box of Milk Bones for the dogsled team, that'll be more like $200.

Now, that's not a terrible price, IF the desiccant lasts a good long while- like several years. 😁 Anybody have a good idea just how long something like that might last?

My air usage is actually pretty low, mostly just a little blowgun action in the machine shop, filling the occasional tire, and the once or twice a year I do some heavy fabrication, a couple of days of some pretty air-hungry tool usage, like die grinders and pistolgrip sanders.

Humidity locally is low to moderate, with most of the winter being very low, of course. I only need to drain the tank maybe twice a year, and only get maybe a cup or two per cycle.

I suppose I could just "try it and see", but I'd like to hear from you fellers, if any of you can shed a bit more light on the subject.

Moving on, as above, I'd managed to get the main line run into the machine room, and just after it comes through the wall, I put in a drop in the back corner, behind the big Exacto mill.



And yes, I'm aware I basically aimed the water drain right at an unsealed 220V outlet. 😁 I don't like just opening the valve and letting the water blast out- that gets all over the floor and stains the walls, so I plan to use some kind of catch container each time I check the drains. Something like an old oil bottle, maybe, with a narrow neck.

Anyway, these are the smaller blocks from the 1/2" kit, rather than the cool flanged blocks like the 3/4" kit had, but they still work just fine. I countersunk the holes again, and discovered the 1/2" kit doesn't come with tube clamps. So I had to go up to Homey-Dee and buy a couple bags of PEX clips, which work just fine, though I'd have preferred screws rather than nails.

After that, I was able to run a good solid 20 feet of straight stretch of the 3/4" along the ceiling, right up to the workbench area towards the front of the machine room. The Sheldon lathe is right across from the workbench, so I set it up with a pair of the reducer tees, sending one 1/2" line to the workbench and the other to the lathe side.

For the workbench, I wound up with this little space right below my vise, after moving everything around to add the big map drawers several years ago. It really isn't good for much, I don't really have anything that fits in there to store it, so I never really bothered finishing it off.



So what I figure I'll do is make a plywood face for it, with the air connection outlet poking through on a bulkhead connector of some sort (which I'll probably have to make.)

The fun bit, however, is I was going to have to run the tubing down the wall. This wall. And through both the shelf and the workbench.



I was forced to clear off the pegboard and take it down, clear off part of the shelf, and move a few things on the bench itself (which is always somewhat cluttered, but is currently very cluttered. 😁 )

But, thanks to a long ship auger, I got it done and in.



Tomorrow I'll need to put the pegboard back up, but hey, I've been needing to neaten that up and clean off the bench for months. 😁

That gets me my leg down to the forthcoming bench outlet (as soon as I figure out what I'm going to make)...



And the upper end is connected to the main line with a second reducer tee.



No, this part of the shop never got a finished ceiling. I'd love to do something with it at some point, but that's kind of far down the list at the moment. 😋


On the other side, I ran the tube through my shelf and down the wall following the 220V line for the lathe. This puts it central between the mill and the lathe, my two main-workhorse machines.



I could then extend the 3/4" tube and turn the corner at the front of the shop...



Where for the time being I installed a 1/4-turn emergency shutoff valve. You'll see why later.



Now, as soon as I get the bench outlet built and installed, I can finally pressurize the system and start leak testing. I'm told this stuff is pretty foolproof, as the fittings seal with O-rings, but there's still a lot of unions and connections, any one of which could leak. I'll put a gauge on it to start with, and if I get any appreciable leakdown, it'll be time to get out a bottle of Windex and the ladder. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: April 27th, 2015, 3:26 pm

August 8th, 2018, 5:46 am #59

If you're interested, I have a pile of 1/4npt bulkhead fittings and the jam nuts to secure them.
I'd be more than happy to send a few your way, just let me know if you want aluminum or brass fittings.

The last half of the pictures aren't showing up for me, so no comments, there.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 8th, 2018, 5:51 am #60

TheFnord wrote:Not to hijack this thread, but the previous owner of my house installed such a 'port' in the outside wall of the garage, which is more or less a 2" PVC fitting with a threaded plug that screws in. I haven't examined it closely enough yet to see how it was anchored in place, but there you go. I guess he preferred that solution over Doc's method.
-That's one of those things where there's no "correct" way to do it. You do whatever works for you. 😁

I've seen guys frame in a very nice, finished passage with an insulated "hatch", I've seen 'em where it's just a rough hole sawed through the inner and outer walls with a jigsaw- and you can see the insulation in between- I know one guy that just uses the cat door (he also runs his exhaust hose out of it 😁 ) and one guy, who admittedly did a great deal of mechanic work, simply had a framed-in, but unfinished hole in the wall, with a flap of inner-tube rubber over the outside.

The best one I ever saw was a largish box, accessed from the outside, but flush with the wall kind of like a breaker box. It had a hose reel and a second QD inside- the box was sealed from the rest of the garage, so with the insulated door open, it didn't create a cold draft.

But it was just a plywood box. The door was thickly insulated with blueboard styrofoam- nicely tapered so it closed like a bank vault door- but the box wasn't insulated from the shop, so it stayed warm. A neat setup, all told.

For me, though, as I said, it's easy enough to just slip the hose under the garage door.

Doc.
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