Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 1st, 2018, 4:04 am #41

And a much-appreciated order is was! Might take me a couple extra days to crank those sketches out, but  we'll get 'er done. 😁

Now, after a very long day of moving heavy crap around, moving ladders around almost constantly, and climbing up and down those ladders about 25,000 times... I have just three photos to show. 😁

First, i still have several pallets full of lathe and bandsaw parts littered across the floor, so to reach the walls, I needed to get those out of the way. Fortunately it was sunny and dry today, so I rolled them all out onto the shop apron, along with the bandsaw chassis, the buffer and the engine lift.

AND... since that finally cleared that part of the floor, I took the opportunity to finish replacing the last few of the old fluorescent lights with the new LEDs. That alone took about two hours.

After that, I was able to run some measurements and screw a bunch of the mounting clips to the wall, in a way that gives me a mild downhill flow. Then, with some borrowed help, we were able to unroll the tube into the clips- with some difficulty, as that stuff is stiffer than it looks.



I only got these two walls run, with one drop between the two garage doors...



And one on the wall to the right in the first photo:



That one's kind of masked off by the valve grinder, but that unit's going to go away one of these days. (And yes, that's a hole in the wall from when that outlet had to be reworked- I've been meaning to fix that too. 😁 )

A grand total of just over eight hours work is shown in those three pics.

And this was the easy section. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: May 11th, 2004, 4:09 am

July 1st, 2018, 2:59 pm #42

What QD style are you using?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 1st, 2018, 4:40 pm #43

Standard Tru-Flate "Automotive". Common, easy to find, cheap to replace. I didn't "pick it" for any specific reason, it was simply what my dad was using back in the day, and I stuck with it.

I know it seems weird to run 3/4" bore pipe to run it all through a 1/4" hole in the QD, but the big piping is more due to the overall length of the run- there'll be just over 150 feet, and however many connections, between the compressor and the endmost outlet.

Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 2nd, 2018, 4:05 am #44

Had a few minutes between weld beads and coats of paint so I put up the third outlet drop.

One quick trick for anyone thinking of using this stuff: It's stiff but bendable by hand, except when you get to the last few inches on an end. It's tough to get any leverage to straighten that bit without crushing or deforming the end- and that of course is where the fitting goes, so you don't want to do that.

So if you're cutting a section off for a drop, unroll and straighten it past where you need to cut it. That way your end is pretty straight, and the end of the rest of the roll is ready to go for the next fitting.



The third and final outlet will be over at the tailstock end of where the big lathe is going, which is also right at one of the workbenches and near the bandsaw, so it'll be centrally located and fairly handy.



The drop isn't connected to anything up at the ceiling, but I'm at least getting ready to make that run. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: November 19th, 2014, 12:50 pm

July 4th, 2018, 1:52 am #45

DocsMachine wrote: I know it seems weird to run 3/4" bore pipe to run it all through a 1/4" hole in the QD,
Definitely not weird. The 'Pro' way is a big bore loop around the ceiling, with slightly less enormous drops. I did a shop once with a 2" loop and 1.5" spokes feeding 3/4" drops. Tools were on 5/8" rubber hose.
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Joined: October 8th, 2014, 2:05 pm

July 4th, 2018, 12:14 pm #46

sniper1rfa wrote:
DocsMachine wrote: I know it seems weird to run 3/4" bore pipe to run it all through a 1/4" hole in the QD,
Definitely not weird. The 'Pro' way is a big bore loop around the ceiling, with slightly less enormous drops. I did a shop once with a 2" loop and 1.5" spokes feeding 3/4" drops. Tools were on 5/8" rubber hose.
Not weird at all. If there's more than one tool using air at the same time the extra flow capacity will be helpful.
If it ain't broke, I'll fix it!
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Joined: November 17th, 2014, 11:09 am

July 4th, 2018, 1:02 pm #47

To bend that stuff, find a solid spring, or a hydraulic hose that fits reasonably snugly inside the tube. Stick a piece of rebar in the end of the spring/tube, stuff it in the pipe, and yeah... bend it.
Can't find anything in the right size?
Find something a bit smaller, and use duct tape...   

As for the 'prettying up' of those aluminium pieces...  
That's not just 'more professional' but also important Health & Safety. Nothing sharp to scratch your hands on when digging 'back there' after something.
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Joined: June 28th, 2017, 11:03 pm

July 4th, 2018, 9:46 pm #48

Wouldn't a conduit bender for EMT tubing be another good way to handle this stuff?
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Joined: November 17th, 2014, 11:09 am

July 4th, 2018, 9:53 pm #49

If you absolutely have to cheat, yes...  
And assuming that it's the same size.
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Joined: November 8th, 2017, 3:33 am

July 5th, 2018, 2:41 am #50

Fill the end with a low melting point alloy then bend away with whatever is handy.  Dip the end in really hot water and the alloy melts and flows out, ready for the next bend.

http://www.hitechalloys.com/hitechalloys_005.htm
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