Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 20th, 2018, 5:19 pm #31

Hey_Allen wrote:Have you considered using a shower head "drop ear brass elbow" for the wall mount?
They have mounting ears to let you mount it to the wall, and they are designed to be sweated onto the copper pipes.
-Yep, ran across those early on. The problem is for compressed air, each "drop" needs a drain. A place for the condensation to collect so it can be periodically blown out.

The showerhead taps would only allow the moisture to be blown out with the air being used- right into your air tool, your spray gun, or worse, your plasma cutter.

The Rapidair mounting blocks come with a 1/4-turn valve fitted on the bottom. In use, depending on local conditions and how often you use it, you periodically go around and 'burp' each one to drain any moisture that's collected.

Doc.
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Joined: April 27th, 2015, 3:26 pm

June 20th, 2018, 6:24 pm #32

My employer used what appear to be TransAir plumbing when we just had our new building fitted with aluminum plumbing, and the drops have drains at each drop.  The problem is that they are at the drop, even with the fitting, which is also slightly angled down.
Some of the illustrations online show doing an upward connection and then down to the drop, but the company who fitted this building did not do anything like that, and on the longer runs we'll sometimes end up blowing around a cup of water out the line when it's used after an idle period.

http://www.tptools.com/tech-metal-piping.dlp
http://cached.tptools.com/Images/airlin ... iagram.pdf   The picture in the beginning of this PDF shows what I was imagining, with a T fitting on the drop to the outlet, and the outlet to the side of the vertical, and elevated (8"  in their drawing) to allow the water to drain down to the trap and drain below.

If the shower elbow was mounted the same way that you would in a shower, with the inlet coming from below, you could secure it to the wall, and a relatively short length of pipe and a simple elbow would run from it to the main air drop pipes.
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Joined: August 16th, 2016, 11:47 am

June 20th, 2018, 6:49 pm #33

DocsMachine wrote:
Hey_Allen wrote:Have you considered using a shower head "drop ear brass elbow" for the wall mount?
They have mounting ears to let you mount it to the wall, and they are designed to be sweated onto the copper pipes.
-Yep, ran across those early on. The problem is for compressed air, each "drop" needs a drain. A place for the condensation to collect so it can be periodically blown out.

The showerhead taps would only allow the moisture to be blown out with the air being used- right into your air tool, your spray gun, or worse, your plasma cutter.

The Rapidair mounting blocks come with a 1/4-turn valve fitted on the bottom. In use, depending on local conditions and how often you use it, you periodically go around and 'burp' each one to drain any moisture that's collected.

Doc.
One of the posts above mentioned running the taps up from the main line and a slope from the source of air to a drain at the end as a moisture control.
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Joined: July 10th, 2016, 2:02 pm

June 20th, 2018, 7:39 pm #34

Heh.  Last time I ran air lines in my teeny little shop, it was 2.5" hose for my dust removal vacuum system.  Low pressure, low speed, moderate volume.
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Joined: October 15th, 2015, 1:31 pm

June 21st, 2018, 1:15 pm #35

Mount the eared shower drop turned 90 degrees, connect to a tee, use a 1/4 turn valve on the lower part of the tee, plum the top to loop.
2003 BIOHAZARD ELECTRO COCKER
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 24th, 2018, 4:36 am #36

Hey_Allen wrote:Some of the illustrations online show doing an upward connection and then down to the drop, but the company who fitted this building did not do anything like that, and on the longer runs we'll sometimes end up blowing around a cup of water out the line when it's used after an idle period.
-Yeah, when I first started planning this, I ran across a clever little setup that I copied. It used a tee off the main line, pointing straight up. Two 90 degree "street ells" took it from pointing straight up to straight down, a short length of tube extended it a bit, and then a pair of 45 degree elbows brought the drop tube back to the same plane as the main tube, and you could affix it directly to the wall like the rest of it.
As I said earlier, I still have a can of the fittings and a couple of pre-made junctions set up like that.
I was trying to think of how I could do it with the RapidAir stuff, but the 3/4" needs a pretty significant radius- like a foot or more- to keep from kinking. And making any kind of an "add on" elbow/junction/drop just means more fittings and adapters and whatnot, increasing the chances of a leak at each one.
But, each drop has a built in drain, and I'm looking at ideas for in-line drains or collectors that will help pull moisture out before it gets to the working areas. It's also not a huge concern as we have relatively low humidity on average (extra-low in the winter, of course 😁 ) and I don't use the air tools anywhere near as much as an auto-body shop or busy mechanic's shop might.
So I think the standard rapidAir straight-down taps will be sufficient.
Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 30th, 2018, 8:43 am #37

Okay, getting this party started... four pages into the thread 😁... I finally got all the kits in. I'll be eating dollar-store ramen for the next month, but I think I got everything I need.

I'd gotten in a box of the 1/2" earlier, and today the 3/4" stuff showed up.



I pulled out the wall-mount/drop parts and got things organized. I also found out exactly what size the outlet taps are, and went and picked up some QDs and bushings.



Now, I just wouldn't be Doc if I didn't customize things a bit along the way, so first I lightly chamfered each screw hole so the screws would sit flush:





My walls are plywood, so I can jam a typical drywall/construction screw in just about anywhere.

And, of course, using the belt grinder and a deburring wheel, I licked the corners round. They just seem a little more finished and professional that way. 😁



Then, I sat down to assemble them all, or at least as many as I could. There's a plug on the backside (I'm assuming for those that will be plumbing these flush, somehow) and a 1/4-turn valve at the bottom.



Then the big compression fitting at the top, and for three of them (I only bought three sets so far) I added the bushings and QD couplers.



And don't skimp on the teflon tape. You don't want to have to go back and disassemble and reseal a fitting somewhere. 😁



Then I picked a couple likely locations for at least two of the drops and stuck 'em in place.



I'm not at all sure whether it's going to be better to start at the fittings and run the hose, or run the hose and then add the fittings. Might be a six-of-one-half-dozen-of-the-other situation. We'll see.

One of the locations is a mid-run drop, meaning it goes up to the ceiling and will meet up with the horizontal line, joining with a Tee. That means I can cut a section, straighten it, and see how it installs without having to wrestle the whole roll around.

The kit quite helpfully includes a very nice tubing cutter tool, which works very well. This section of tube was cut with it- that's how the cut came out, as is. No reforming back to round or anything.



Note the construction of the tubing: A thick inner layer of PEX, a thin aluminum shell, and a thin outer layer of PEX. It's very easy to bend or straighten in long lengths, but short sections- like the last 8" or so of a section- is very hard to move by hand. I may have to try and whip up a bending aid, something that won't crush the pipe.

Assembly is easy: Use the chamfer tool to make a slight "lead in" angle to the newly-cut end, slide the nut and inner collar over the tube, push it onto the O-ringed nipple on the fitting, screw the nut down finger-tight, then give the nut at least another 3/4 turn.



Easy as that. I have no way to leak test anything yet, but it's as easy as that. 😁

I'm hoping to get at least one short section run this weekend, but we'll see how the schedule goes.

Doc.
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Joined: October 28th, 2014, 1:06 am

July 1st, 2018, 12:32 am #38

....I'll be eating dollar-store ramen for the next month,

That's no good. You live in Alaska, doesn't your dollar store carry salmon?  :-)

I think I'll go order something from your store so you don't have to eat ramen, dollar store, or otherwise.
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Joined: June 2nd, 2015, 3:34 am

July 1st, 2018, 12:35 am #39

Order two things so he can get a can of over-processed chili and no-name-Spam-like-meat from the dollar store as well!
It is possible to commit no mistakes and still lose. That is not a weakness. That is life.
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Joined: October 28th, 2014, 1:06 am

July 1st, 2018, 12:46 am #40

Actually, I ordered seven.  ;-)
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