Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

8:33 AM - Jun 07, 2018 #11

Now you guys know why I always seem to be behind. 😁 Come last Monday morning, I had about fifteen things planned for this week, and so far, I've gotten exactly four of them done.

On the other hand, the wholly unplanned project is now almost complete.

Fair warning, there's a lot of necessary detail bits coming up, so if you have an unhealthy aversion to welding, I suggest you go lie down.

Oh, and for those of you wondering if I'm keeping up on my customer work, yes, indeed. I have had four customer projects on the table as of Tuesday morning, and of this afternoon, I'm down to two. 😁

Anyway, while the new grinder is now basically back up to 100%, this kind of machine is designed to bolt to a workbench. I have zero workbench space onto which to bolt it, and besides, I want to be able to roll it outside for major grinding jobs, so as to not have to fill the shop with grit and gunk.

I'll be fitting a scoop to attach a shop vac or bigger dust control system for the occasional indoor grinding of small jobs, but again we need to pay attention to mixing iron and aluminum dusts.

So the main trick will be to simply roll it outside and let the dust fall where it may. 😁

So I need a stand with wheels. As noted, I don't want to go with simple locking casters, because the wheels aren't big enough. I have a nasty step between the shop concrete and the apron concrete, and even hand truck tires need a bit of a run to make it up those, if you're carrying any kind of a load.

Also, in the not-unlikely event of wanting to do some grinding outside during the winter, the wheels also need to be able to do a little off roading, and go over at least a modicum of ice or snow.

In that light, I envisioned a stand with two wheels and a handle, like a hand truck. You tilt it back, walk it around, set it back upright. Once it's down, it's on solid feet and stable.

Earlier this spring I'd bought an armload of 1" steel box tubing, specifically for a stand for the KMG grinder, a stand for the T-shirt press, and a couple other things. So it was a simple matter of cutting to length, squaring up, and welding.



Now, as this is intended to be a mobile stand, I decided to throw convention out the window and try something new. This will be a three point stand, not a four point. Three, as we all know, like the typical bar stool, will sit flat on almost any surface- that is, all three legs will make contact, and it'll sit fairly stably, even if the floor isn't the greatest.

Four won't necessarily do that, and you always seem to have that one leg that doesn't touch the floor. I built my buffer stand this way, and as virtually none of my floors are smooth and level, often it's easiest just to set it up out in the grass, otherwise the rocking as I'm polishing drives me nuts.

So, for the back lower crossbar, I found an ideal cutoff in the scrap bin, and milled a notch for it...



That, suitably welded into place, accepts this levelable machine foot- usually meant to be mounted to the base of a machine so you can level it, and rubber so it won't go sliding across the floor.




It's worth noting that one of the many handy things this belt grinder can do, is sand the ends of this kind of box tubing square and true. Clamp two of them together, and you can precisely finish them to the exact same length.



Yes, you can and I have done the same thing over the years with a milling machine. It's just one more option.

Anyway, after a couple of hours of measuring, cutting, cursing, cutting again, sanding to fit, tack welding, more cursing and tea Dew, it's coming nicely together.



Once the main frame was complete and fully welded, it was time to add some wheels. My first idea was this:



Which, on reflection, stuck them too far out from the center of gravity, and would have made it "heavier" to tip up and balance. A better idea was this:



Incidentally, I was doing the "cardboard aided design" thing long before the Project Binky guys. 😁 They owe me royalties.

That design got the wheels closer to the COG, and I was initially planning to use thin plate for the mounts. I thought that might be a bit wobbly, so I came up with something else. I started by lopping several chunks out of a cut-off of the box tubing.



TIG welded them into paired triangles...



And bandsawed, faced, drilled and tapped these two sprogs of 1" steel.



I marked it 'bout thar...



And milled a round seat in its place.



Due to the almost unclampable shape of the piece, I was forced to use a ball-end mill. This would have been a perfect application for the horizontal mill, but some knob seems to have run off with some important parts of it.

(continued next post....)


[/img]
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

9:02 AM - Jun 07, 2018 #12

The steel collar and saddle piece attach to the stand leg like so:



I could have simply welded the collar straight to the leg, but spacing it rearward lifts the "foot" of the stand away from the ground quicker and gives you more "ground clearance" without having to carry the whole thing at an uncomfortable angle.

The collars and mounts get fully TIG welded together...



Clamped in place (at this point both the tire and the leg are in contact with the table, with all the weight being on the leg.)



Tacked, and then the "action" checked....



And then fully welded into place.



After that, I added two bars at the back to stiffen the frame, and to help support the load on that rear foot.



And finally, I repurposed the old wheel support template, and reworking the CAD model, produced a pattern for the handlebar.



That gets transferred over to a piece of 3-mil plate 10-gauge steel...



Bandsawed out....



Rounded and smoothed neatly and easily on the belt grinder itself...



Squared up and tacked in place...



And the bar tubing trimmed to length and tacked in as well.



And there it is! Done!



Okay, mostly. I'm still considering how to use the storage under the grinder. I'd originally planned on just defaulting to shelves, but the accessories like extra tooling arms and contact wheels don't really pile onto shelves well, and besides, everything would simply slide off and squish my toes when the thing is tilted onto its wheels and moved.

But, we're gonna leave that aside for now. I'm going to wait 'til I have more tooling and see how I might be able to make a rack or socket arrangement to store them- without also having to have a bunch of clamps or straps to keep them from falling out when its tilted.

For the time being, all that was left was to slide the grinder onto the stand, drill and tap the mounting holes, and bolt it down.



Now, the old VFD mount wasn't going to work with this setup, but I knew that going in. I'd originally intended making a new brace mount to hold the control box underneath, but once everything was in place, an easy solution presented itself. I simply took the old mounting arm, tweaked it gently in the hydraulic press...



And, drilling a new hole in the grinder mounting base, simply bolted it right back up.



I rerouted the wires to better suit the new setup, and rolled 'er out into the sun for a beauty shot. 😁



It's pretty much 100% ready to go, now. It's easy to move, fairly stable (albeit a bit top-heavy, which should improve once I get more tooling arms and other accessories stored underneath) and easily converted over to horizontal. I still need to find a proper bolt for that left-hand wheel, but that's just a trip to Homey-D if I can't find one in my bins.

For here on out, everything else is just detail work, so I think we can list this one as COMPLETED! 😁

Doc.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: 4:09 AM - May 11, 2004

12:00 PM - Jun 07, 2018 #13

Nice job!  Though you may want to lop off that axle sticking out... unless you have future plans for retaining wire wheels and knockoff center caps ;)
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: 4:00 AM - Sep 12, 2014

4:59 PM - Jun 07, 2018 #14

Have you tried it in horizontal position yet? It looks like the CG may be a bit too far to the left for your three-point mount.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: 1:55 AM - Sep 29, 2016

5:54 PM - Jun 07, 2018 #15

How easy is it to tilt when you want to get it up onto the wheels and roll it around?  It looks like you're leaning towards stability in use, rather than ease of movement (not a bad compromise).
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

8:11 PM - Jun 07, 2018 #16

Though you may want to lop off that axle sticking out.
-Second to last line: "I still need to find a proper bolt for that left-hand wheel..."  😁
Have you tried it in horizontal position yet? It looks like the CG may be a bit too far to the left for your three-point mount.
-Of course, and it's stable either way. It's admittedly a bit top-heavy, and a four-point would help that, but it's not a problem in use, and once there's a rackful of accessories underneath to help lower the CG, it'll be even better.
How easy is it to tilt when you want to get it up onto the wheels and roll it around?
-It takes a bit of effort, but not a lot. Just like a hand truck, a foot against the bottom bar, a bit of a tug, and you're off. And yes, I very definitely designed it more for stability than ease of portability- although putting the wheels on the "front" was definitely the latter. This will spend most of it's time against a wall, and putting the wheels on the "back" would mean you'd need to turn it around and slide it into place each time.

Plus the "front" is where all the weight is, thanks to the tool arms, so that gets the more stable two-point end.

Doc.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: 2:05 PM - Oct 08, 2014

8:38 PM - Jun 07, 2018 #17

What color are you going to paint it?
If it ain't broke, I'll fix it!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

8:45 PM - Jun 07, 2018 #18

Probably just rattlecan machine grey. Like everything else. 😁

Doc.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

5:01 AM - Jun 09, 2018 #19

The machine itself may be done, but like any good tool, there's always accessories. 😁

In this case, I've had two contact wheels sitting around waiting to go on the homebrew grinder, a 4" that was graciously donated by a Guild regular, and an 8" wheel I bought off another board last year.

The 8" has an odd hub- it's a pressed and spot-welded steel "rim", with an aluminum hub that holds the bearings:



The hub locates to the rim by a simple step, and is "clamped" on the opposite side by a plate and three countersunk screws. I've never seen this style before, and have no idea why they did it what way. Seems like it'd be more cost and labor to make it than if it were a one-piece aluminum hub.

Anyway, it was cheap, and the "tire" is in good shape, so I figured I can still use it. The "axle", however, just had this dinky little stub- seen above to the left of the collar on the shaft.  Not sure how that was supposed to be held, maybe by a pinch bolt or something, so I got rid of it.

The ID of the bearings is .751", so I took a few measurements and turned up a steel adapter:



That slides snuggly into the bearing ID, and has a spacer to position it properly to the side of the tool arm, to line up with where the rollers on the 'square wheel' fixture are. I also had to bore out the center of the flat cap on the opposite side, and make a spacer for the bolt to seat against. After that, it was just a matter of drilling and tapping a 1/2" hole in the end of a fresh bar of 1-1/2" square steel, and bolting it together.



Slid into the machine in place of the square wheel attachment and the tool rest readjusted, and she looks right at home.



Better still, luck appears to have been on my side, as the belt lines up and tracks perfectly, with no change in the tracking adjustment necessary, from the square wheel fixture.



There's a tiny bit of vibration, possibly due to the wheel and hub setup being slightly out of balance, but it's well within acceptable.

As soon as i can pick up another chunk of the 1-1/2" square bar, I'll make one for the 4" wheel too. 😁

Doc.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: 2:28 PM - Jun 10, 2018

2:32 PM - Jun 10, 2018 #20

Very jealous of that machine!!!!

I have an old delta combo that I've had for years and then two years ago got a Kalamazoo 1x42.

Best method for Dust control, at least when it's running in the vertical, is to hang a bucket of water immediately below the front of the machine. You create a really neat slurry (don't drink it even if you think you are super man), but it keeps a lot of dust and junk from going airborne.

Enjoy!

E
Quote
Like
Share