Speaking of big chunks of metal lying around..

Speaking of big chunks of metal lying around..

Curt
Curt

June 14th, 2011, 10:51 pm #1

I have had this for over a decade:

Its a bar of "Invar" that was appropriated while I was working on a satellite. 2.75" by 21" I was supposed to make a lens mount out of it, but through a miscommunication I got this huge chunk of metal that was bigger than the lathe I was using

As I understand it, this was expensive stuff, and since it had been shipped to us the paper trail was broken so useless for the government/NASA work it would normally go for. No one wanted it and I eventually got stuck with a 30lb paperweight.

Anyone want it for something cool? I would part with it for basically shipping, but to a good home, not just to have.

-Curt
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Russ Kepler
Russ Kepler

June 14th, 2011, 11:01 pm #2

I can use it in clockmaking, but I can't promise to use it right away. Still working on my latest project:


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Curt
Curt

June 14th, 2011, 11:15 pm #3

If that is a homemade steam turbione you win.

From what I've read this metal is actually used in clockmaking quite a bit, although I don't know why. send me an email and we'll talk.

-Curt
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Curt
Curt

June 14th, 2011, 11:16 pm #4

nevermind.. I see the pistons now :P N/T
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Maker of Toys
Maker of Toys

June 14th, 2011, 11:52 pm #5

If that is a homemade steam turbione you win.

From what I've read this metal is actually used in clockmaking quite a bit, although I don't know why. send me an email and we'll talk.

-Curt
IIRC, Invar was actually created for chronometer making, as it has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion, thus parts mad out of it don't change dimensions much with temperature. . . a handy characteristic to have if your life depends on a clock remaining accurately set for long periods of time in a changing environment, like navigating with a sextant on board a sailing ship.

If your specimen was intended as a optical train part, it's more probably Kovar which, (also IIRC) is matched TCE-wise with borosilicate glass.

Invar and its variants are also quite nice for making other things (like lens mounts and other tooling) for the same reason.

It WILL warp if you provoke it. . . but once it picks a shape, it generally stays that way. (I didn't enjoy my first shop encounter with the stuff. . . guy handed me a plate of it and a sketch, without bothering to tell me what it was, and stupid me, I tried to cut it like was 1018. Turns out invar has a huge amount of nickel in it, and, well. . . so do Inconel and Hasteloy which are notorious for being recalcitrant in the shop. Shucks and other comments.)
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Tohri
Tohri

June 15th, 2011, 12:15 am #6

I have had this for over a decade:

Its a bar of "Invar" that was appropriated while I was working on a satellite. 2.75" by 21" I was supposed to make a lens mount out of it, but through a miscommunication I got this huge chunk of metal that was bigger than the lathe I was using

As I understand it, this was expensive stuff, and since it had been shipped to us the paper trail was broken so useless for the government/NASA work it would normally go for. No one wanted it and I eventually got stuck with a 30lb paperweight.

Anyone want it for something cool? I would part with it for basically shipping, but to a good home, not just to have.

-Curt
Have to be milled, but hey, a $400 piston for a $100 motor is worth it, right?
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Derek
Derek

June 15th, 2011, 12:16 am #7

i have to agree. :) n/t
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MephitMark
MephitMark

June 15th, 2011, 12:35 am #8

I can use it in clockmaking, but I can't promise to use it right away. Still working on my latest project:

Minor train buff here.

What line and engine are you modeling after?

I take it the frame and bogies are complete. And you are obviously pressure testing the boiler under fire.
I suppose the cabin and such are the next major part to work on?


http://www.stcroixrr.org/

http://www.mtmuseum.org/
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Stumpy
Stumpy

June 15th, 2011, 1:20 am #9

I can use it in clockmaking, but I can't promise to use it right away. Still working on my latest project:

What're you gonna make? Replacement parts for Big Ben?
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Curt
Curt

June 15th, 2011, 1:31 am #10

IIRC, Invar was actually created for chronometer making, as it has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion, thus parts mad out of it don't change dimensions much with temperature. . . a handy characteristic to have if your life depends on a clock remaining accurately set for long periods of time in a changing environment, like navigating with a sextant on board a sailing ship.

If your specimen was intended as a optical train part, it's more probably Kovar which, (also IIRC) is matched TCE-wise with borosilicate glass.

Invar and its variants are also quite nice for making other things (like lens mounts and other tooling) for the same reason.

It WILL warp if you provoke it. . . but once it picks a shape, it generally stays that way. (I didn't enjoy my first shop encounter with the stuff. . . guy handed me a plate of it and a sketch, without bothering to tell me what it was, and stupid me, I tried to cut it like was 1018. Turns out invar has a huge amount of nickel in it, and, well. . . so do Inconel and Hasteloy which are notorious for being recalcitrant in the shop. Shucks and other comments.)
I am pretty sure its Invar, that name sticks in my head and Kovar sounds alien. Interested to see what can be done with it
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