So, who's seen "Act of Valor"?

So, who's seen "Act of Valor"?

Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

March 6th, 2012, 9:23 am #1

I wanted to see it opening weekend, but my schedule just didn't sync up.

Just got back, theater was still about half full (though admittedly there's nothing else interesting playing right now.)

My take? Excellent story, but with an asterisk.

A few reviews have called the acting "wooden", and yeah, it kinda felt in places like it was an episode of some reality show or listening to the guys from "Pawn Stars" banter. But that's because these guys aren't actors- put 'em in a mission briefing or giving radio chatter, and they sound like the real thing because they are the real thing.

Would they have gained anything by giving the top slot to a professional actor? In my opinion, no. To me they sounded more human, more believable- if a little forced at times- than most actors do. We're kind of trained to see the smooth-talking, voice-coached actor as 'real' instead of an actual person- and that actual person then comes off as awkward and forced when on film.

The actor works in a film because it's often meant to be escapist- you don't go to I, Robot to watch the latest actual technology concerning artificial intelligence developments at MIT. You got to it to watch a cyborg future-cop shoot two handguns while jumping a motorcycle through the air.

I can watch that and be thrilled at the sheer spectacle of it, but there's no real emotional attachment. You know Will Smith isn't going to die, or even crash the motorcycle and spend the next six months in surgery and physical therapy.

Valor's people struck me as more real- in part, yes, because I'd read a lot of the background of it, but mostly because they acted real. In real life, the guy that has all his lines practiced and knows just what to say comes off sounding like a politician on the campaign trail.

And because they felt real, and because the action sequences felt real, I have to admit a little more than usual connection. Even the death scenes in Saving Private Ryan, which themselves were well done, didn't quite tug at the ol' heartstrings like Valor.

There were no giant robots, there were no bottomless magazines- except for the miniguns on the slicks, of course - there was no just-a-little-too-clever repartee`, the 'hero' didn't spout some witty line just before he capped the bad guy, and there was no buxom smarter-than-the-guys heroine running around in a tank top.

And yet, it had me closer to the edge of my seat than any Die Hard or Transformers or even Black Hawk Down.

If you're used to all of those movies, or sit through an M. Night Sharamalamadingdong movie going "I saw it comin'", then you'll find the plot of Valor to be "meh". It's quite straightforward; there's no plot twists, there's no hidden traitor, there's no skate-box macguffin and there's no shadowy figures from some classified department even the President doesn't know about. There's an objective, they go in, people get shot, they get out. That's it.

And yet- or perhaps because of it- it still kept me enthralled, wondering what was going to happen next. Regardless of the concept or genre` or script, that's damn good cinema.

If nothing else, go see it just for the Chinooks dropping off the SOC-R riverboat "slicks", and the ensuing live fire minigun carnage. (For those that haven't heard, a fair percentage of the time, the SeALs- who were actual active-duty SeALs- were firing live ammunition. Yes, really.)

Doc.
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Kitkun
Kitkun

March 6th, 2012, 11:54 am #2

Making me regret not keeping up with movie news. n/t
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Webwolf
Webwolf

March 6th, 2012, 12:01 pm #3

I wanted to see it opening weekend, but my schedule just didn't sync up.

Just got back, theater was still about half full (though admittedly there's nothing else interesting playing right now.)

My take? Excellent story, but with an asterisk.

A few reviews have called the acting "wooden", and yeah, it kinda felt in places like it was an episode of some reality show or listening to the guys from "Pawn Stars" banter. But that's because these guys aren't actors- put 'em in a mission briefing or giving radio chatter, and they sound like the real thing because they are the real thing.

Would they have gained anything by giving the top slot to a professional actor? In my opinion, no. To me they sounded more human, more believable- if a little forced at times- than most actors do. We're kind of trained to see the smooth-talking, voice-coached actor as 'real' instead of an actual person- and that actual person then comes off as awkward and forced when on film.

The actor works in a film because it's often meant to be escapist- you don't go to I, Robot to watch the latest actual technology concerning artificial intelligence developments at MIT. You got to it to watch a cyborg future-cop shoot two handguns while jumping a motorcycle through the air.

I can watch that and be thrilled at the sheer spectacle of it, but there's no real emotional attachment. You know Will Smith isn't going to die, or even crash the motorcycle and spend the next six months in surgery and physical therapy.

Valor's people struck me as more real- in part, yes, because I'd read a lot of the background of it, but mostly because they acted real. In real life, the guy that has all his lines practiced and knows just what to say comes off sounding like a politician on the campaign trail.

And because they felt real, and because the action sequences felt real, I have to admit a little more than usual connection. Even the death scenes in Saving Private Ryan, which themselves were well done, didn't quite tug at the ol' heartstrings like Valor.

There were no giant robots, there were no bottomless magazines- except for the miniguns on the slicks, of course - there was no just-a-little-too-clever repartee`, the 'hero' didn't spout some witty line just before he capped the bad guy, and there was no buxom smarter-than-the-guys heroine running around in a tank top.

And yet, it had me closer to the edge of my seat than any Die Hard or Transformers or even Black Hawk Down.

If you're used to all of those movies, or sit through an M. Night Sharamalamadingdong movie going "I saw it comin'", then you'll find the plot of Valor to be "meh". It's quite straightforward; there's no plot twists, there's no hidden traitor, there's no skate-box macguffin and there's no shadowy figures from some classified department even the President doesn't know about. There's an objective, they go in, people get shot, they get out. That's it.

And yet- or perhaps because of it- it still kept me enthralled, wondering what was going to happen next. Regardless of the concept or genre` or script, that's damn good cinema.

If nothing else, go see it just for the Chinooks dropping off the SOC-R riverboat "slicks", and the ensuing live fire minigun carnage. (For those that haven't heard, a fair percentage of the time, the SeALs- who were actual active-duty SeALs- were firing live ammunition. Yes, really.)

Doc.
Tangent: I'm *not* the only one who calls him "Shamalamadingdong?" (n/t)
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Aaron
Aaron

March 6th, 2012, 12:06 pm #4

I wanted to see it opening weekend, but my schedule just didn't sync up.

Just got back, theater was still about half full (though admittedly there's nothing else interesting playing right now.)

My take? Excellent story, but with an asterisk.

A few reviews have called the acting "wooden", and yeah, it kinda felt in places like it was an episode of some reality show or listening to the guys from "Pawn Stars" banter. But that's because these guys aren't actors- put 'em in a mission briefing or giving radio chatter, and they sound like the real thing because they are the real thing.

Would they have gained anything by giving the top slot to a professional actor? In my opinion, no. To me they sounded more human, more believable- if a little forced at times- than most actors do. We're kind of trained to see the smooth-talking, voice-coached actor as 'real' instead of an actual person- and that actual person then comes off as awkward and forced when on film.

The actor works in a film because it's often meant to be escapist- you don't go to I, Robot to watch the latest actual technology concerning artificial intelligence developments at MIT. You got to it to watch a cyborg future-cop shoot two handguns while jumping a motorcycle through the air.

I can watch that and be thrilled at the sheer spectacle of it, but there's no real emotional attachment. You know Will Smith isn't going to die, or even crash the motorcycle and spend the next six months in surgery and physical therapy.

Valor's people struck me as more real- in part, yes, because I'd read a lot of the background of it, but mostly because they acted real. In real life, the guy that has all his lines practiced and knows just what to say comes off sounding like a politician on the campaign trail.

And because they felt real, and because the action sequences felt real, I have to admit a little more than usual connection. Even the death scenes in Saving Private Ryan, which themselves were well done, didn't quite tug at the ol' heartstrings like Valor.

There were no giant robots, there were no bottomless magazines- except for the miniguns on the slicks, of course - there was no just-a-little-too-clever repartee`, the 'hero' didn't spout some witty line just before he capped the bad guy, and there was no buxom smarter-than-the-guys heroine running around in a tank top.

And yet, it had me closer to the edge of my seat than any Die Hard or Transformers or even Black Hawk Down.

If you're used to all of those movies, or sit through an M. Night Sharamalamadingdong movie going "I saw it comin'", then you'll find the plot of Valor to be "meh". It's quite straightforward; there's no plot twists, there's no hidden traitor, there's no skate-box macguffin and there's no shadowy figures from some classified department even the President doesn't know about. There's an objective, they go in, people get shot, they get out. That's it.

And yet- or perhaps because of it- it still kept me enthralled, wondering what was going to happen next. Regardless of the concept or genre` or script, that's damn good cinema.

If nothing else, go see it just for the Chinooks dropping off the SOC-R riverboat "slicks", and the ensuing live fire minigun carnage. (For those that haven't heard, a fair percentage of the time, the SeALs- who were actual active-duty SeALs- were firing live ammunition. Yes, really.)

Doc.
I had the chance to see it opening weekend and really thought it was good. The acting was a little wooden as you commented but I knew these guys were not actors. But the combat sences were very fluid and smooth since this is what they done. It was also good to see no endless mags, or only the good guys can hit the bad guys. It was also nice to see the use of semi-auto as well as the use of "safetys" on the guns. I would recomend this movie to people. It will keep keep you on the edge of you seat from start to finish.

Aaron
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Wolf
Wolf

March 6th, 2012, 12:24 pm #5

I wanted to see it opening weekend, but my schedule just didn't sync up.

Just got back, theater was still about half full (though admittedly there's nothing else interesting playing right now.)

My take? Excellent story, but with an asterisk.

A few reviews have called the acting "wooden", and yeah, it kinda felt in places like it was an episode of some reality show or listening to the guys from "Pawn Stars" banter. But that's because these guys aren't actors- put 'em in a mission briefing or giving radio chatter, and they sound like the real thing because they are the real thing.

Would they have gained anything by giving the top slot to a professional actor? In my opinion, no. To me they sounded more human, more believable- if a little forced at times- than most actors do. We're kind of trained to see the smooth-talking, voice-coached actor as 'real' instead of an actual person- and that actual person then comes off as awkward and forced when on film.

The actor works in a film because it's often meant to be escapist- you don't go to I, Robot to watch the latest actual technology concerning artificial intelligence developments at MIT. You got to it to watch a cyborg future-cop shoot two handguns while jumping a motorcycle through the air.

I can watch that and be thrilled at the sheer spectacle of it, but there's no real emotional attachment. You know Will Smith isn't going to die, or even crash the motorcycle and spend the next six months in surgery and physical therapy.

Valor's people struck me as more real- in part, yes, because I'd read a lot of the background of it, but mostly because they acted real. In real life, the guy that has all his lines practiced and knows just what to say comes off sounding like a politician on the campaign trail.

And because they felt real, and because the action sequences felt real, I have to admit a little more than usual connection. Even the death scenes in Saving Private Ryan, which themselves were well done, didn't quite tug at the ol' heartstrings like Valor.

There were no giant robots, there were no bottomless magazines- except for the miniguns on the slicks, of course - there was no just-a-little-too-clever repartee`, the 'hero' didn't spout some witty line just before he capped the bad guy, and there was no buxom smarter-than-the-guys heroine running around in a tank top.

And yet, it had me closer to the edge of my seat than any Die Hard or Transformers or even Black Hawk Down.

If you're used to all of those movies, or sit through an M. Night Sharamalamadingdong movie going "I saw it comin'", then you'll find the plot of Valor to be "meh". It's quite straightforward; there's no plot twists, there's no hidden traitor, there's no skate-box macguffin and there's no shadowy figures from some classified department even the President doesn't know about. There's an objective, they go in, people get shot, they get out. That's it.

And yet- or perhaps because of it- it still kept me enthralled, wondering what was going to happen next. Regardless of the concept or genre` or script, that's damn good cinema.

If nothing else, go see it just for the Chinooks dropping off the SOC-R riverboat "slicks", and the ensuing live fire minigun carnage. (For those that haven't heard, a fair percentage of the time, the SeALs- who were actual active-duty SeALs- were firing live ammunition. Yes, really.)

Doc.
Yeah. People say that to me to that they sounded drab when speaking. But then again many of us here know what battlefield speak in the heat of it sounds like.

" Left Side! ", Thier comming around behind us!"...
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Wolf
Wolf

March 6th, 2012, 12:26 pm #6

How many of us were taking notes for future Mil-sim costumes?
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Foxfre5
Foxfre5

March 6th, 2012, 1:29 pm #7

afgadfgadrgadfg
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Skreemer
Skreemer

March 6th, 2012, 2:06 pm #8

I wanted to see it opening weekend, but my schedule just didn't sync up.

Just got back, theater was still about half full (though admittedly there's nothing else interesting playing right now.)

My take? Excellent story, but with an asterisk.

A few reviews have called the acting "wooden", and yeah, it kinda felt in places like it was an episode of some reality show or listening to the guys from "Pawn Stars" banter. But that's because these guys aren't actors- put 'em in a mission briefing or giving radio chatter, and they sound like the real thing because they are the real thing.

Would they have gained anything by giving the top slot to a professional actor? In my opinion, no. To me they sounded more human, more believable- if a little forced at times- than most actors do. We're kind of trained to see the smooth-talking, voice-coached actor as 'real' instead of an actual person- and that actual person then comes off as awkward and forced when on film.

The actor works in a film because it's often meant to be escapist- you don't go to I, Robot to watch the latest actual technology concerning artificial intelligence developments at MIT. You got to it to watch a cyborg future-cop shoot two handguns while jumping a motorcycle through the air.

I can watch that and be thrilled at the sheer spectacle of it, but there's no real emotional attachment. You know Will Smith isn't going to die, or even crash the motorcycle and spend the next six months in surgery and physical therapy.

Valor's people struck me as more real- in part, yes, because I'd read a lot of the background of it, but mostly because they acted real. In real life, the guy that has all his lines practiced and knows just what to say comes off sounding like a politician on the campaign trail.

And because they felt real, and because the action sequences felt real, I have to admit a little more than usual connection. Even the death scenes in Saving Private Ryan, which themselves were well done, didn't quite tug at the ol' heartstrings like Valor.

There were no giant robots, there were no bottomless magazines- except for the miniguns on the slicks, of course - there was no just-a-little-too-clever repartee`, the 'hero' didn't spout some witty line just before he capped the bad guy, and there was no buxom smarter-than-the-guys heroine running around in a tank top.

And yet, it had me closer to the edge of my seat than any Die Hard or Transformers or even Black Hawk Down.

If you're used to all of those movies, or sit through an M. Night Sharamalamadingdong movie going "I saw it comin'", then you'll find the plot of Valor to be "meh". It's quite straightforward; there's no plot twists, there's no hidden traitor, there's no skate-box macguffin and there's no shadowy figures from some classified department even the President doesn't know about. There's an objective, they go in, people get shot, they get out. That's it.

And yet- or perhaps because of it- it still kept me enthralled, wondering what was going to happen next. Regardless of the concept or genre` or script, that's damn good cinema.

If nothing else, go see it just for the Chinooks dropping off the SOC-R riverboat "slicks", and the ensuing live fire minigun carnage. (For those that haven't heard, a fair percentage of the time, the SeALs- who were actual active-duty SeALs- were firing live ammunition. Yes, really.)

Doc.
Real guy VS. Actor and I think the real guy won. The stare was more intense, the techniques used was the first time I'd seen on film the ones I've read about.

Take a read of "How to Break a Terrorist: The U.S. Interrogators Who Used Brains, Not Brutality, to Take Down the Deadliest Man in Iraq", by Matthew Alexander and John Bruning.

To me the straight line plot solidified the reality. The cloak and dagger stuff is handled by other people. The SeALs teams are run by objectives, "Go here, accomplish this task, get home safe."
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Tenacious221
Tenacious221

March 7th, 2012, 12:14 am #9

I wanted to see it opening weekend, but my schedule just didn't sync up.

Just got back, theater was still about half full (though admittedly there's nothing else interesting playing right now.)

My take? Excellent story, but with an asterisk.

A few reviews have called the acting "wooden", and yeah, it kinda felt in places like it was an episode of some reality show or listening to the guys from "Pawn Stars" banter. But that's because these guys aren't actors- put 'em in a mission briefing or giving radio chatter, and they sound like the real thing because they are the real thing.

Would they have gained anything by giving the top slot to a professional actor? In my opinion, no. To me they sounded more human, more believable- if a little forced at times- than most actors do. We're kind of trained to see the smooth-talking, voice-coached actor as 'real' instead of an actual person- and that actual person then comes off as awkward and forced when on film.

The actor works in a film because it's often meant to be escapist- you don't go to I, Robot to watch the latest actual technology concerning artificial intelligence developments at MIT. You got to it to watch a cyborg future-cop shoot two handguns while jumping a motorcycle through the air.

I can watch that and be thrilled at the sheer spectacle of it, but there's no real emotional attachment. You know Will Smith isn't going to die, or even crash the motorcycle and spend the next six months in surgery and physical therapy.

Valor's people struck me as more real- in part, yes, because I'd read a lot of the background of it, but mostly because they acted real. In real life, the guy that has all his lines practiced and knows just what to say comes off sounding like a politician on the campaign trail.

And because they felt real, and because the action sequences felt real, I have to admit a little more than usual connection. Even the death scenes in Saving Private Ryan, which themselves were well done, didn't quite tug at the ol' heartstrings like Valor.

There were no giant robots, there were no bottomless magazines- except for the miniguns on the slicks, of course - there was no just-a-little-too-clever repartee`, the 'hero' didn't spout some witty line just before he capped the bad guy, and there was no buxom smarter-than-the-guys heroine running around in a tank top.

And yet, it had me closer to the edge of my seat than any Die Hard or Transformers or even Black Hawk Down.

If you're used to all of those movies, or sit through an M. Night Sharamalamadingdong movie going "I saw it comin'", then you'll find the plot of Valor to be "meh". It's quite straightforward; there's no plot twists, there's no hidden traitor, there's no skate-box macguffin and there's no shadowy figures from some classified department even the President doesn't know about. There's an objective, they go in, people get shot, they get out. That's it.

And yet- or perhaps because of it- it still kept me enthralled, wondering what was going to happen next. Regardless of the concept or genre` or script, that's damn good cinema.

If nothing else, go see it just for the Chinooks dropping off the SOC-R riverboat "slicks", and the ensuing live fire minigun carnage. (For those that haven't heard, a fair percentage of the time, the SeALs- who were actual active-duty SeALs- were firing live ammunition. Yes, really.)

Doc.
Using live ammunition probably kept production costs down...And considering they're probably on the short SHORT list of actors that know what they're doing with firearms, not a bad decision.

blank conversions are expensive
blanks are more expensive than regular rounds
blanks are dirty, you gotta pay someone to clean the guns every few dozen shots

-Ten
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Pirate
Pirate

March 7th, 2012, 3:33 am #10

I wanted to see it opening weekend, but my schedule just didn't sync up.

Just got back, theater was still about half full (though admittedly there's nothing else interesting playing right now.)

My take? Excellent story, but with an asterisk.

A few reviews have called the acting "wooden", and yeah, it kinda felt in places like it was an episode of some reality show or listening to the guys from "Pawn Stars" banter. But that's because these guys aren't actors- put 'em in a mission briefing or giving radio chatter, and they sound like the real thing because they are the real thing.

Would they have gained anything by giving the top slot to a professional actor? In my opinion, no. To me they sounded more human, more believable- if a little forced at times- than most actors do. We're kind of trained to see the smooth-talking, voice-coached actor as 'real' instead of an actual person- and that actual person then comes off as awkward and forced when on film.

The actor works in a film because it's often meant to be escapist- you don't go to I, Robot to watch the latest actual technology concerning artificial intelligence developments at MIT. You got to it to watch a cyborg future-cop shoot two handguns while jumping a motorcycle through the air.

I can watch that and be thrilled at the sheer spectacle of it, but there's no real emotional attachment. You know Will Smith isn't going to die, or even crash the motorcycle and spend the next six months in surgery and physical therapy.

Valor's people struck me as more real- in part, yes, because I'd read a lot of the background of it, but mostly because they acted real. In real life, the guy that has all his lines practiced and knows just what to say comes off sounding like a politician on the campaign trail.

And because they felt real, and because the action sequences felt real, I have to admit a little more than usual connection. Even the death scenes in Saving Private Ryan, which themselves were well done, didn't quite tug at the ol' heartstrings like Valor.

There were no giant robots, there were no bottomless magazines- except for the miniguns on the slicks, of course - there was no just-a-little-too-clever repartee`, the 'hero' didn't spout some witty line just before he capped the bad guy, and there was no buxom smarter-than-the-guys heroine running around in a tank top.

And yet, it had me closer to the edge of my seat than any Die Hard or Transformers or even Black Hawk Down.

If you're used to all of those movies, or sit through an M. Night Sharamalamadingdong movie going "I saw it comin'", then you'll find the plot of Valor to be "meh". It's quite straightforward; there's no plot twists, there's no hidden traitor, there's no skate-box macguffin and there's no shadowy figures from some classified department even the President doesn't know about. There's an objective, they go in, people get shot, they get out. That's it.

And yet- or perhaps because of it- it still kept me enthralled, wondering what was going to happen next. Regardless of the concept or genre` or script, that's damn good cinema.

If nothing else, go see it just for the Chinooks dropping off the SOC-R riverboat "slicks", and the ensuing live fire minigun carnage. (For those that haven't heard, a fair percentage of the time, the SeALs- who were actual active-duty SeALs- were firing live ammunition. Yes, really.)

Doc.
Like Doc said, these guys are the real deal. The part that hit me the most was after the LT leaves his home and wife to go on deployment, and we see the wife slide down the door after it closes. There is a real cost to both the men and women who deploy forward, and their families that stay behind.

God bless.
~Pirate
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