So what do you plan to do this year?

So what do you plan to do this year?

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 3rd, 2018, 10:42 am #1

Note I didn't say "resolve" to do, 'cause screw New Years' resolutions.

The only good New Years resolution is to stop doing the things you don't like, and do more of the things you do like- and most of us live every day that way.

But, even if it's not a proper resolution, most of us generally have a list of things we hope or plan to do in the coming year. Personally, as regular readers will know, I have "to do" lists that extend out to probably three or four times longer than I can be expected to live. Lists that could only be fully accomplished if I had at least eight figures in the bank, half a dozen clones of myself, and they figure out a way to extend the average lifespan within the next couple of years.

I will say I pared a few of those down last year, and plan to divest myself of a few others this year. I'm also setting a few aside, knowing I simply can't get them all done in one year.

However, as regular readers know, there's a few projects that have been fairly high on my list recently, and I really hope to get those sorted out this year.

Top of my list would have to be my Lever-Action Project. I'd really hoped to get a lot further along on that last year, but other things always split my attention. Can't say that won't happen again this year, but I'm still gonna damn well try.

I'm also hoping this is the year I can finally fully finish my big Springfield Lathe project. I drug that monster home in late 2013, and I still don't have it completed. Point in fact, I basically haven't touched it since last January.

But, supposedly this year, I'll finally be able to send the bed off to get ground, and if I can, once it's back, with a bit more (admittedly nontrivial) work, it'll be basically back up to 100% again, effectively a brand-new lathe.

I have a new (to me) rear axle to slide under the Cutlass, and I'd love to also be able to get a fresh set of bucket seats in there (the stock bench is broken and partially collapsed.) That should actually be pretty quick, the axle is just an unbolt-and-rebolt. Then again, it's been sitting on my welding table to four months now, just waiting for me to rebuild the brakes.

I need to get my cabinet and dust control setup sorted out for the Shapeoko- that's kind of a crucial component in the leer-action build. Shouldn't take more than a week, if i could find a week to spend on it.

The bandsaw I want to upgrade to a 3-phase motor with more HP and a softer start, as well as an actual DoAll blade-speedometer. That, too, should only take a week.

The very last thing I need to do to the Sheldon lathe (apart from install the new VFD) is build and install the cabinet drawers. I bought the sheet aluminum for those over a year ago. And I need to build a bigger press brake first, in order to make them.

The Exacto is up and running- I've used it several times- but still needs some detail work. A way wiper, way covers, a knee oiler, a spindle brake, possibly a custom-fitted replacement table power feed, etc.

I've got more 220V wiring to run, I need to completely rebuild my ethernetwork in the shop (wasn't an issue before, but now all of a sudden I have three computers out there!) I need to finish my belt grinder (like the article I posted yesterday notes, I started that particular project nearly a decade ago!) I still need to run a shop-air system (I've wanted a proper one for years) and of course there's a couple machine I've gotta fix just to be able to sell.

Note that none of that is anything like a hobby or pastime. The closest thing to that is the Cutlass, which is simply fun to drive. Apart from that, it's... well, it's basically work, and more tools in order to do more work.

You people are lucky I like my work.

So whatchoo gonna get done this year?

Doc.
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

January 3rd, 2018, 12:42 pm #2

Right now the only concrete plan is a trip to Sweden with my wife in July. Tickets are booked, vacation time is scheduled. Now I just need to pick up some Swedish so I'm not a complete Water Buffalo over there.

That's more of a vacation than a project, though, so let's see:

There's a giant (as in five feet wide by seven long by eight tall) shipping crate I snagged from work sitting in the yard. That's gonna get turned into a tool shed.

I'd like to build a grape arbor and start planting an orchard somewhere on the property. It's a step toward self-sufficiency, and takes less day-to-day work than a vegetable garden to maintain.

I want to convert part of the big barn into a workshop. There's a small one in the garage, but there's no room to expand, and the door's too small to build anything big. I'll probably turn that one into a storage room.

My '83 Ranger died pretty hard back in September. Time permitting, I'm going to try to use it to learn some engine repair. If I do get it running again, I'm planning to build a flat bed on it, upgrade the suspension, and have a better hauler than my current pickup. Sport sides suck.

We have a small treehouse-slash-guest-cottage back in the woods. It's already powered and heated, but I'd like to add some kind of insulation to the floor, and maybe try to run a data line out there as well. 'Cause roughing it doesn't have to be rough.

We have two buildings on the property that are just being used to keep junk dry. The garage needs to be cleaned out, at least enough to be usable as a garage. And I really need to go in and organize all the loose scrap lumber in the small barn. But those aren't as fun as the rest of the plans.
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

January 3rd, 2018, 12:44 pm #3

I also need to get some lighting in the small barn before I can organize it. I'm thinking solar.
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

January 3rd, 2018, 1:14 pm #4

And the kitchen cabinets need to be redone. And the foot bridge down by the pond could really use some work. And the other foot bridge over the ravine needs to be power washed and resealed. And my neighbor who Knows These Things tells me there might be a market for my chain maille in the local drag scene (seriously).

I'd better stop thinking about this. My year's already filling up.
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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Joined: July 12th, 2017, 12:19 am

January 3rd, 2018, 1:41 pm #5

Note I didn't say "resolve" to do, 'cause screw New Years' resolutions.

The only good New Years resolution is to stop doing the things you don't like, and do more of the things you do like- and most of us live every day that way.

But, even if it's not a proper resolution, most of us generally have a list of things we hope or plan to do in the coming year. Personally, as regular readers will know, I have "to do" lists that extend out to probably three or four times longer than I can be expected to live. Lists that could only be fully accomplished if I had at least eight figures in the bank, half a dozen clones of myself, and they figure out a way to extend the average lifespan within the next couple of years.

I will say I pared a few of those down last year, and plan to divest myself of a few others this year. I'm also setting a few aside, knowing I simply can't get them all done in one year.

However, as regular readers know, there's a few projects that have been fairly high on my list recently, and I really hope to get those sorted out this year.

Top of my list would have to be my Lever-Action Project. I'd really hoped to get a lot further along on that last year, but other things always split my attention. Can't say that won't happen again this year, but I'm still gonna damn well try.

I'm also hoping this is the year I can finally fully finish my big Springfield Lathe project. I drug that monster home in late 2013, and I still don't have it completed. Point in fact, I basically haven't touched it since last January.

But, supposedly this year, I'll finally be able to send the bed off to get ground, and if I can, once it's back, with a bit more (admittedly nontrivial) work, it'll be basically back up to 100% again, effectively a brand-new lathe.

I have a new (to me) rear axle to slide under the Cutlass, and I'd love to also be able to get a fresh set of bucket seats in there (the stock bench is broken and partially collapsed.) That should actually be pretty quick, the axle is just an unbolt-and-rebolt. Then again, it's been sitting on my welding table to four months now, just waiting for me to rebuild the brakes.

I need to get my cabinet and dust control setup sorted out for the Shapeoko- that's kind of a crucial component in the leer-action build. Shouldn't take more than a week, if i could find a week to spend on it.

The bandsaw I want to upgrade to a 3-phase motor with more HP and a softer start, as well as an actual DoAll blade-speedometer. That, too, should only take a week.

The very last thing I need to do to the Sheldon lathe (apart from install the new VFD) is build and install the cabinet drawers. I bought the sheet aluminum for those over a year ago. And I need to build a bigger press brake first, in order to make them.

The Exacto is up and running- I've used it several times- but still needs some detail work. A way wiper, way covers, a knee oiler, a spindle brake, possibly a custom-fitted replacement table power feed, etc.

I've got more 220V wiring to run, I need to completely rebuild my ethernetwork in the shop (wasn't an issue before, but now all of a sudden I have three computers out there!) I need to finish my belt grinder (like the article I posted yesterday notes, I started that particular project nearly a decade ago!) I still need to run a shop-air system (I've wanted a proper one for years) and of course there's a couple machine I've gotta fix just to be able to sell.

Note that none of that is anything like a hobby or pastime. The closest thing to that is the Cutlass, which is simply fun to drive. Apart from that, it's... well, it's basically work, and more tools in order to do more work.

You people are lucky I like my work.

So whatchoo gonna get done this year?

Doc.
My project for this year is getting my model railroad layout built in the basement. Last year's project (I didn't expect it to take the whole year) was getting the basement remodeled and finished. That was hired out (included structural work and plumbing under a concrete floor). The painters are coming by to do touch-ups tomorrow.

Before I can start working on that, I need to get the work-shop side of the garage organized, stuff put away and tossed. I do have the garage side of the garage empty so I can park the truck in there.

I still have boxes upstairs that haven't been unpacked from when I moved in in Sept. of 2016. But some of that requires finding tools, which requires workshop cleaning. (I know I have at least three utility knives, I'm not going to buy another one!)

Lot's of capitol projects at work this year, but that's work.

I also want to get caught up on my layout build blog. If you're interested, seehttp://soueasts-line.blogspot.com.

Tim
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

January 3rd, 2018, 2:00 pm #6

I feel your pain. I have a couple of boxes that've followed me through three moves without ever being unpacked. It's all sentimental stuff, though, so I can't just get rid of it.
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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Joined: February 12th, 2012, 9:33 am

January 3rd, 2018, 2:49 pm #7

And the kitchen cabinets need to be redone. And the foot bridge down by the pond could really use some work. And the other foot bridge over the ravine needs to be power washed and resealed. And my neighbor who Knows These Things tells me there might be a market for my chain maille in the local drag scene (seriously).

I'd better stop thinking about this. My year's already filling up.
Cool that you have decided to visit our (mostly) Polarbear free country!

Just a few tips =)

1. Swedes do speak English... like 99% of us do! however! 98% of us think that we are far better at it than we actually are, be prepared for some fun misunderstandings.

2. Prepare yourself for our official signs! seriously! being able to pass the first "Utfart" (exit) sign with a straight face is a sure sign of a seasoned Sweden-traveler. Seeing a sign saying "Slut" is NOT an offer of questionable services it simply says that that the store is out of something. (there are MANY more)

3. The coffee... (our word for coffee-break is fika and we do it all the time)) not only do we drink it often but it is often Doc-strength!

I think that covers the basics... if there is something more specific you want to know just ask =)
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Joined: April 25th, 2016, 7:52 pm

January 3rd, 2018, 2:52 pm #8

Right now the only concrete plan is a trip to Sweden with my wife in July. Tickets are booked, vacation time is scheduled. Now I just need to pick up some Swedish so I'm not a complete Water Buffalo over there.

That's more of a vacation than a project, though, so let's see:

There's a giant (as in five feet wide by seven long by eight tall) shipping crate I snagged from work sitting in the yard. That's gonna get turned into a tool shed.

I'd like to build a grape arbor and start planting an orchard somewhere on the property. It's a step toward self-sufficiency, and takes less day-to-day work than a vegetable garden to maintain.

I want to convert part of the big barn into a workshop. There's a small one in the garage, but there's no room to expand, and the door's too small to build anything big. I'll probably turn that one into a storage room.

My '83 Ranger died pretty hard back in September. Time permitting, I'm going to try to use it to learn some engine repair. If I do get it running again, I'm planning to build a flat bed on it, upgrade the suspension, and have a better hauler than my current pickup. Sport sides suck.

We have a small treehouse-slash-guest-cottage back in the woods. It's already powered and heated, but I'd like to add some kind of insulation to the floor, and maybe try to run a data line out there as well. 'Cause roughing it doesn't have to be rough.

We have two buildings on the property that are just being used to keep junk dry. The garage needs to be cleaned out, at least enough to be usable as a garage. And I really need to go in and organize all the loose scrap lumber in the small barn. But those aren't as fun as the rest of the plans.
Well, there are a number of projects I kind of want to do - a VBA interface for doing long-docs stuff in Word, and learning some API documentation and javascript programmming. This last could help me professionally, perhaps.
And there is a tree to cut down and several to prune or remove.
But the main semi-fun project is to get the 'new' powertrain (and rear suspension) wired and swapped into my project car. It is close enough now that I may just (move a bunch of crap around to make room, and then) move the car into the driveway and tear the old mess out and get started. Right now the car runs fine and is fun, so I have to look at the 'more fun with more power' aspect, and the 'current trans is really shot' aspect and the 'new system is taking up space and is just an art project until it goes into the car' aspect as motivation.
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

January 3rd, 2018, 3:09 pm #9

Cool that you have decided to visit our (mostly) Polarbear free country!

Just a few tips =)

1. Swedes do speak English... like 99% of us do! however! 98% of us think that we are far better at it than we actually are, be prepared for some fun misunderstandings.

2. Prepare yourself for our official signs! seriously! being able to pass the first "Utfart" (exit) sign with a straight face is a sure sign of a seasoned Sweden-traveler. Seeing a sign saying "Slut" is NOT an offer of questionable services it simply says that that the store is out of something. (there are MANY more)

3. The coffee... (our word for coffee-break is fika and we do it all the time)) not only do we drink it often but it is often Doc-strength!

I think that covers the basics... if there is something more specific you want to know just ask =)
I try to make a point of learning at least a bit of the language if I'm traveling overseas. It seems like it's courteous at the very least, and also useful in encountering that remaining 1%. (That said, we have some friends we'll be staying with in Umeå, and their English is better than that of most of my coworkers, so I might not get much of an opportunity to try my Swedish out.) I have a bit of a head start this time around - I've got a bit of Icelandic from a trip my family took back in the '90s. Are there any falso cognates I should look out for?

One thing I've encountered in my travels is the assumption that Americans just don't bother with other languages. I remember shopkeepers in Berlin insisting on addressing us in English even when my wife started the conversations in fluent German. It's a stereotype I'd like to do my bit to dispel.

I just need to remember not to try it if I'm drinking - after a few of those generous German beers, I started trying to order the next round in Spanish.
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

January 3rd, 2018, 3:11 pm #10

False cognates.

Typos are especially embarrassing when you're complaining about other people's English.
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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