So what do I do with a cup of titanium?

So what do I do with a cup of titanium?

Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

May 28th, 2012, 5:16 am #1

Managed to finish up several small jobs over the weekend, one of which was modding a titanium DYE 2-piece. I'd just cleaned off the lathe before starting on it, and so I was able to sweep up most of the swarf left over:



While it looks like a lot, it's like steel wool- it's mostly air. There's probably only two or three grams of metal there, at best.

I've already tried hitting a small snarl with a propane torch, and it makes some impressive sparks. So I'm wondering, what can I do with this?

Crumble it up and add some smokeless powder? Fling it on a campfire?

Compress it into a wad and sell it on eBay as a rare, aerospace billet brillo pad?

I have a small piece of magnesium. File that down and mix the two?

Doc.
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Ketira
Ketira

May 28th, 2012, 12:51 pm #2

What would doing that do?

..........just curious. I am not as enlightened in metalworking as you are.

As for selling it: perhaps selling it as "spark enhancers"?

I've seen some jewelry made out of titanium, but it's been ages. I'm not sure why jewelry stores don't have the stuff. (After all, it's naturally hypoallergenic --at least to those who are {like me} allergic to nickel.)
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newmaticarsenal
newmaticarsenal

May 28th, 2012, 1:15 pm #3

Managed to finish up several small jobs over the weekend, one of which was modding a titanium DYE 2-piece. I'd just cleaned off the lathe before starting on it, and so I was able to sweep up most of the swarf left over:



While it looks like a lot, it's like steel wool- it's mostly air. There's probably only two or three grams of metal there, at best.

I've already tried hitting a small snarl with a propane torch, and it makes some impressive sparks. So I'm wondering, what can I do with this?

Crumble it up and add some smokeless powder? Fling it on a campfire?

Compress it into a wad and sell it on eBay as a rare, aerospace billet brillo pad?

I have a small piece of magnesium. File that down and mix the two?

Doc.
Please!
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Phoex
Phoex

May 28th, 2012, 5:37 pm #4

What would doing that do?

..........just curious. I am not as enlightened in metalworking as you are.

As for selling it: perhaps selling it as "spark enhancers"?

I've seen some jewelry made out of titanium, but it's been ages. I'm not sure why jewelry stores don't have the stuff. (After all, it's naturally hypoallergenic --at least to those who are {like me} allergic to nickel.)
Well jewelry stores don't sell it because it's nearly impossible to cut a titanium ring off a swollen finger. That and it doesn't have the same cachet (Outside of geek circles) as the 'precious' metals. There are some stores, mainly online, that do sell titanium rings, just be careful of what I mentioned above.
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Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

May 28th, 2012, 10:03 pm #5

What would doing that do?

..........just curious. I am not as enlightened in metalworking as you are.

As for selling it: perhaps selling it as "spark enhancers"?

I've seen some jewelry made out of titanium, but it's been ages. I'm not sure why jewelry stores don't have the stuff. (After all, it's naturally hypoallergenic --at least to those who are {like me} allergic to nickel.)
The "mixing" part has nothing to do with chemistry- they don't react on contact with each other or anything like that.

I mentioned magnesium because it's a common flammable metal. "Fire starters" that consist of a block of magnesium and a strip of flint are a commonly-sold outdoor/survivalist trinket. You use a pocket knife to shave off some magnesium (it's softer than aluminum) then strike the blade on the flint strip to produce sparks- like a lighter's striker wheel. The flint sparks ignite the magnesium, which burns with a very hot, white flame, which can ignite even wet materials.

Titanium doesn't burn quite as readily, but can indeed burn. If you've ever seen an episode of Battlebots, it's common to see a big blast of white sparks when somebody gets a hit with a high speed weapon- those sparks are from titanium.

Anyway, in this case, the magnesium shavings would simply help ignite the titanium faster, or to prolong the flame.

There's not enough titanium to make anything useful, even if I had a way to melt and cast it without it all oxidizing. (Basically for this swarf, I'd need an electric vacuum furnace.) So really, setting fire to it is the highest and best use.

Doc.
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keantoken
keantoken

May 28th, 2012, 11:36 pm #6

Actually, it reminds me of that wool we were talking about earlier for cleaning soldering iron tips. But I don't know if titanium would work the same as brass which the wool is made of.
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keantoken
keantoken

May 28th, 2012, 11:39 pm #7

Well jewelry stores don't sell it because it's nearly impossible to cut a titanium ring off a swollen finger. That and it doesn't have the same cachet (Outside of geek circles) as the 'precious' metals. There are some stores, mainly online, that do sell titanium rings, just be careful of what I mentioned above.
How about make one with a notch and set screw in it so the screw can be tightened to force the ring open? Unfortunately I don't know any machinist lingo.
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Renegade_Azzy
Renegade_Azzy

May 29th, 2012, 1:12 am #8

The "mixing" part has nothing to do with chemistry- they don't react on contact with each other or anything like that.

I mentioned magnesium because it's a common flammable metal. "Fire starters" that consist of a block of magnesium and a strip of flint are a commonly-sold outdoor/survivalist trinket. You use a pocket knife to shave off some magnesium (it's softer than aluminum) then strike the blade on the flint strip to produce sparks- like a lighter's striker wheel. The flint sparks ignite the magnesium, which burns with a very hot, white flame, which can ignite even wet materials.

Titanium doesn't burn quite as readily, but can indeed burn. If you've ever seen an episode of Battlebots, it's common to see a big blast of white sparks when somebody gets a hit with a high speed weapon- those sparks are from titanium.

Anyway, in this case, the magnesium shavings would simply help ignite the titanium faster, or to prolong the flame.

There's not enough titanium to make anything useful, even if I had a way to melt and cast it without it all oxidizing. (Basically for this swarf, I'd need an electric vacuum furnace.) So really, setting fire to it is the highest and best use.

Doc.
You cant tig it back together into a tube?
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Ketira
Ketira

May 29th, 2012, 4:52 am #9

Well jewelry stores don't sell it because it's nearly impossible to cut a titanium ring off a swollen finger. That and it doesn't have the same cachet (Outside of geek circles) as the 'precious' metals. There are some stores, mainly online, that do sell titanium rings, just be careful of what I mentioned above.
....as in going in holes in one's ear.... I don't bother with rings 'cause I lose them all the time. (Either that, or a thief decides I'm an easy target and slips 'em off my finger. I caught one thief trying to get a silver pendant off of me one time and told that idiot to give me some personal space.)

....Online, hm? I'll have to check around. I know what you mean about rings; Mom wore her wedding ring until her cancer surgery. I think she still has it, but now wears a nice "eternity" ring instead.
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Ketira
Ketira

May 29th, 2012, 5:44 am #10

The "mixing" part has nothing to do with chemistry- they don't react on contact with each other or anything like that.

I mentioned magnesium because it's a common flammable metal. "Fire starters" that consist of a block of magnesium and a strip of flint are a commonly-sold outdoor/survivalist trinket. You use a pocket knife to shave off some magnesium (it's softer than aluminum) then strike the blade on the flint strip to produce sparks- like a lighter's striker wheel. The flint sparks ignite the magnesium, which burns with a very hot, white flame, which can ignite even wet materials.

Titanium doesn't burn quite as readily, but can indeed burn. If you've ever seen an episode of Battlebots, it's common to see a big blast of white sparks when somebody gets a hit with a high speed weapon- those sparks are from titanium.

Anyway, in this case, the magnesium shavings would simply help ignite the titanium faster, or to prolong the flame.

There's not enough titanium to make anything useful, even if I had a way to melt and cast it without it all oxidizing. (Basically for this swarf, I'd need an electric vacuum furnace.) So really, setting fire to it is the highest and best use.

Doc.
Mix it in with the wax, add your local pine cone, and sell 'em to campgrounds. (I wouldn't bother trying this in a fireplace as I can see the potential to burn the house down that way.)

....and get a video of what happens when the heat meets the metal.
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