Roger's testing got out of hand!

Joined: September 16th, 2016, 6:41 pm

October 29th, 2017, 10:23 am #1

My guess is that Roger decided to run a "real-world" test on the Mark-VI Combat Drones' weapons, data networking and problem solving. Being that Doc and the others had more important things on their minds and Jinx was dismissed as too young and/or lacking in knowledge/experience, Roger started the test on his own with no "Range Safety Officer" to shutdown the test when it got out of hand.
Roger should have started off with a single, simple problem and an automatic shutdown order upon completion of the problem. Unfortunately, it seems the drones' "problem-solving" program capabilities were faster and greater than anticipated. As Roger ordered no end to the exercise, the drones learned quicker, solved more complex problems and increased their application of force to the point that the exercise would continue until either the drones or Roger were "destroyed". Jinx's entry into the exercise was seen as a minor obstacle to be neutralized, therefore once disabled Jinx was ignored and all attention returned on locating and neutralizing/destroying Roger. Seeing as Roger's power supply is depleted and he now has multiple drones hunting for him, one can only hope he makes it to the controls and the "kill-switch" before they find him and "end" the exercise.
I'm just wondering how much damage Doc is going to do to Roger when he returns to the shop and finds the damage to the shop, multiple expensive combat drones and an expensive combat suit.
In the words of Ricky Ricardo: "Lucy! You have some explaining to do!"
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Joined: October 28th, 2014, 1:06 am

October 29th, 2017, 3:20 pm #2

I reached the same conclusion with a couple of differences. I presumed that originally their weapons were supposed to have been disabled. But, either there was a programming mistake, and they still had full power. Or, as a process of their learning abilities, they discovered their problems were easier to solve with functional weapons, and were able to turn them back on.

Doc may not be mad at all. This test may be going far better than they expected, and a little damage to the office is be expected during this kind of testing. I could see Doc and Roger discussing the obstacle course that the robots need to complete for a final test. "Well, they need to follow a target through a second story window, descend some stairs, use an elevator, and not hurt any bystanders along they way." Heck, that could be the text in the DARPA contract.



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Joined: May 22nd, 2016, 10:05 pm

October 29th, 2017, 6:13 pm #3

The "no hurting noncombatants" clause sounds like something the government should put in.
Love thou the rose, yet leave it on its stem. -- Edward Bulwer-Lytton
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Joined: September 16th, 2016, 6:41 pm

October 29th, 2017, 10:19 pm #4

I reached the same conclusion with a couple of differences. I presumed that originally their weapons were supposed to have been disabled. But, either there was a programming mistake, and they still had full power. Or, as a process of their learning abilities, they discovered their problems were easier to solve with functional weapons, and were able to turn them back on.

Doc may not be mad at all. This test may be going far better than they expected, and a little damage to the office is be expected during this kind of testing. I could see Doc and Roger discussing the obstacle course that the robots need to complete for a final test. "Well, they need to follow a target through a second story window, descend some stairs, use an elevator, and not hurt any bystanders along they way." Heck, that could be the text in the DARPA contract.


I think Roger started with a few drones activated and weapons set to a Laser tag/MILES equivalent to test their learning curve. Unless you're well along the testing protocol, you start slow and work your way up. And when working with a system that "talks" to the individual units and learns from its mistakes and failures, you MUST have an end of exercise command or kill switch/command to terminate the exercise if something does wrong or levels up too quickly.
I think the exercises started simple and easy, but because of Roger 'winning' to often or "cheated" (Bang! Your dead! "No I'm not, you missed!) so the drones thought, "Well, if level one doesn't work let's up it to two...three...four an so forth." It possibly thought if one of two drones aren't enough, let's add one/two/three...all the drones until it got out of hand.
Roger is now hoping he can pull the plug on this exercise somehow before the drones catch him and "terminate with extreme prejudice" the target...him!
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Joined: October 8th, 2014, 2:05 pm

October 29th, 2017, 10:56 pm #5

I think if Roger was trying to pull the plug on a test program he'd be headed for the mainframe, computer core, or AI lab. Seeing as how he's headed for the High Energy Physics lab, I suspect he's more interested in just blowing the plug to smithereens.
If it ain't broke, I'll fix it!
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Joined: August 16th, 2016, 11:47 am

October 31st, 2017, 12:55 am #6

Roger is heading to the high energy lab to recharge his own weapons. Maybe overcharge to reach a level that will take out the robots.
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