Question for the firearms people

Question for the firearms people

WolfFan
WolfFan

April 15th, 2012, 3:43 am #1

Does anyone know when the first muzzle brakes were developed? I've seen them on high-velocity artillery, mostly anti-tank artillery, made in the 1940s (mostly German ATA: 7.5 cm PAK, 8.8 cm PAK/FLAK, 12.8 cm FLAK) and on some small arms, notably the Cutts compensator on some Thompson guns and assorted muzzle brakes on anti-tank rifles (see the Boys rifle, for example) and on some fully automatic battle and assault rifles. Except for the Cutts compensator on the Thompsons I can't find a mention before the 1930s. Was the Cutts the first muzzle brake?

And, oh, does anyone know if any naval artillery ever had muzzle brakes fitted?
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bunker_o_matic
bunker_o_matic

April 15th, 2012, 5:31 am #2

The russians had anti tank rifles that had muzzle brakes IIRC.
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Madcat
Madcat

April 15th, 2012, 9:06 am #3

Does anyone know when the first muzzle brakes were developed? I've seen them on high-velocity artillery, mostly anti-tank artillery, made in the 1940s (mostly German ATA: 7.5 cm PAK, 8.8 cm PAK/FLAK, 12.8 cm FLAK) and on some small arms, notably the Cutts compensator on some Thompson guns and assorted muzzle brakes on anti-tank rifles (see the Boys rifle, for example) and on some fully automatic battle and assault rifles. Except for the Cutts compensator on the Thompsons I can't find a mention before the 1930s. Was the Cutts the first muzzle brake?

And, oh, does anyone know if any naval artillery ever had muzzle brakes fitted?
As far as I remember naval guns dont need muzzle breaks as usually the turret had recoil dampeners and the mass of the ship absorbs what ever recoil remains,it is the same with aircraft machine guns and cannons, army artillery need the muzzle breaks so they don't dig themselves into the ground, machine guns need them so the recoil doesn't throw them off target.
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Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward

April 15th, 2012, 5:44 pm #4

The russians had anti tank rifles that had muzzle brakes IIRC.
> The russians had anti tank rifles that had muzzle brakes IIRC.

PTRS-41 and PTRD-41. (And several other experimental models in 1939-41.) On Wikipedia photos the brake is too small to see it well, but Google Image Search gives several close-ups on the first page.
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Joined: April 18th, 2005, 4:54 pm

April 16th, 2012, 4:31 am #5

Does anyone know when the first muzzle brakes were developed? I've seen them on high-velocity artillery, mostly anti-tank artillery, made in the 1940s (mostly German ATA: 7.5 cm PAK, 8.8 cm PAK/FLAK, 12.8 cm FLAK) and on some small arms, notably the Cutts compensator on some Thompson guns and assorted muzzle brakes on anti-tank rifles (see the Boys rifle, for example) and on some fully automatic battle and assault rifles. Except for the Cutts compensator on the Thompsons I can't find a mention before the 1930s. Was the Cutts the first muzzle brake?

And, oh, does anyone know if any naval artillery ever had muzzle brakes fitted?
I can't find a period photo to confirm it, but many of the air cooled aircraft version Lewis guns had muzzle brakes fitted. I can find contemporary photos of them fitted to WWI aircraft, but no WWI photos showing them fitted.

Vickers is out though. It may look like a muzzle brake, but it was actually a muzzle BOOSTER fitted to those, in order to increase the initial recoil. This was because the gun was recoil operated, and it helped reliability.

-Hans
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WolfFan
WolfFan

April 16th, 2012, 9:03 am #6

Thanks all
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Nighthawke
Nighthawke

April 16th, 2012, 2:52 pm #7

I can't find a period photo to confirm it, but many of the air cooled aircraft version Lewis guns had muzzle brakes fitted. I can find contemporary photos of them fitted to WWI aircraft, but no WWI photos showing them fitted.

Vickers is out though. It may look like a muzzle brake, but it was actually a muzzle BOOSTER fitted to those, in order to increase the initial recoil. This was because the gun was recoil operated, and it helped reliability.

-Hans



According to the site, the gun really didn't need a brake since it was recoil operated, and it was tame in any position.
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Joined: January 23rd, 2012, 7:14 pm

April 16th, 2012, 4:26 pm #8

Does anyone know when the first muzzle brakes were developed? I've seen them on high-velocity artillery, mostly anti-tank artillery, made in the 1940s (mostly German ATA: 7.5 cm PAK, 8.8 cm PAK/FLAK, 12.8 cm FLAK) and on some small arms, notably the Cutts compensator on some Thompson guns and assorted muzzle brakes on anti-tank rifles (see the Boys rifle, for example) and on some fully automatic battle and assault rifles. Except for the Cutts compensator on the Thompsons I can't find a mention before the 1930s. Was the Cutts the first muzzle brake?

And, oh, does anyone know if any naval artillery ever had muzzle brakes fitted?
Are in 1926 as a climb arrestor then recoil is mentioned after that. Military plans first then commercial civilian stuff.
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Flank
Flank

April 17th, 2012, 2:39 am #9




According to the site, the gun really didn't need a brake since it was recoil operated, and it was tame in any position.
nt
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