Project Binky Ep 17 is up!

Project Binky Ep 17 is up!

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 26th, 2018, 7:26 am #1

Episode 17 of Project Binky!

Okay, it was up a week ago- I bin bizy- but hopefully some of you gearheads have already seen it. And it's possibly their best episode yet, not only for the humor and a couple of good extra visual gags, but for the workmanship as well. I have to admit I'd never even considered the possibility of altering a heater core like that- the only thing even close to that that I've ever done was unsoldering a longer, bent inlet tube from an old core, and soldering it into a differentย  core to aim the hose slightly different.

But that was brass, and a soldering job that was about as complex as replacing a pipe in a sink.

Having at one time actually tried- and failed, miserably- making a heater box of my own (in my Corvair- you'll recall the original car was air-cooled, and I needed a water-based heater box) I'm seriously impressed at their work.

Doc.
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Joined: May 11th, 2004, 4:09 am

May 26th, 2018, 1:39 pm #2

I was pretty impressed with their rework of the hvac system.ย  Also surprised they were stuffing AC into that sucrets can
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Joined: August 3rd, 2015, 8:49 am

May 27th, 2018, 12:39 pm #3

Agreed! Gives me ideas for squeezing AC into my Bug someday!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 28th, 2018, 8:04 pm #4

I was feeling a bit poorly yesterday, so since I couldn't stomach a vapid movie or TV show, I rewatched about half the Binky episodes again.

And once again, I'm struck by just how... I guess quietly clever these blokes are. And by that I mean two things- mainly, they're not really doing the "Hooray for Me!" and "Check out THAT kick-ass bit of cool stuff, plebe!" thing. They let the workmanship speak for itself, and manage to explain it without sounding condescending.

And the other way is in the workmanship itself. Nothing is done half-assed, but yet very little- even the HVAC unit- is more complex than necessary.

Okay, the tilt front end might be. ๐Ÿ˜

To say nothing of their support equipment- things like the clever little jig for cutting the stainless exhaust elbows, rigging an electric drill on a little Sherline rotary table and using a C-clamp as a "throttle", to make a rotary welding positioner (with a thick chunk of copper cable as a sliding contact) the highly effective homemade sheetmetal brakes, the ad-hoc dimple dies...

And I still love the humor. (Humour? ๐Ÿ˜ ) The stick-on marker light hole from the ACME Corporation (especially the line where Nik says he was "looking up rockets on the ACME website...") trying the duck to see if it'd work as a duct, cutting a cookie/biscuit as a template for the trunk latch, the innumerable Python, Blackadder and Naked Gun references...

One of my favorites is still when they tested the new pedal box. One foot for the clutch, another foot for the brake, a third foot for the gas. ๐Ÿ˜

I wish they could produce the episodes faster, but then, I wish I didn't have a roomful of projects that in some cases have been sitting around for ten freakin' years now. (And in the latest episode, if you look closely, you can actually see how much time it took- Nik's hair gets noticeably longer in the few minutes before his haircut gag, showing that that ten minutes or so actually took at least two or three months to accomplish.)

Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 28th, 2018, 8:07 pm #5

WolfenTech wrote:Agreed! Gives me ideas for squeezing AC into my Bug someday!
-I suppose I'm actually kind of surprised there's not a bolt-in kit for that kind of thing these days. I know the hot-rod magazines are chock full of about a dozen companies that make some pretty fancy AC setups that'll fit in anything from a Model T to an AC Cobra.

But I suppose the lack of a place to put the evaporator/radiator kinda hinders that, doesn't it?

Why not get one of those boxes off the top of a Winnebago and bolt it to the roof? ๐Ÿ˜

Doc.
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Joined: August 3rd, 2015, 8:49 am

May 29th, 2018, 4:13 am #6

DocsMachine wrote:
WolfenTech wrote:Agreed! Gives me ideas for squeezing AC into my Bug someday!
-I suppose I'm actually kind of surprised there's not a bolt-in kit for that kind of thing these days. I know the hot-rod magazines are chock full of about a dozen companies that make some pretty fancy AC setups that'll fit in anything from a Model T to an AC Cobra.

But I suppose the lack of a place to put the evaporator/radiator kinda hinders that, doesn't it?

Why not get one of those boxes off the top of a Winnebago and bolt it to the roof? ๐Ÿ˜

Doc.
Oh, there are such kits, though some reduce the the front legroom by quite a bit! I'm just thinking it might be possible to manage something a touch smaller and more elegant by doing it custom. It would be nice if I could make it cheaper than the kits, too, but I'd be satisfied with less obnoxious fit in the available space. First though, having a running vehicle to build such into!
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Joined: September 16th, 2014, 7:01 am

May 29th, 2018, 6:32 am #7

Go look in the NAPA "PSA" or "Balkamp" Catalog, they have several bolt in and plumb up heater box/core/fan assemblies for various sizes of car (with some 2" knockouts for defroster hoses) and under-seat heaters for School Buses (low profile and well armored against Kiddy Feet) and Heavy Trucks.That way the add-on AC kit you can get for the Corvair stays just an AC kit like built, and you have heat separately.

And the little ones would be perfect for building a Hot Box for delivering Pizzas.ย  BK 745-1043, 1044, 1045, 1048, 735-6948, 6949.
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Joined: April 20th, 2018, 11:37 pm

June 2nd, 2018, 6:16 pm #8

Just finished watching all 17 episodes!ย  Thanks for the recomendation.

One question I have is,ย  How many ounces of the original car do you think are still involved in the build at this point :).ย ย 
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Joined: September 11th, 2014, 5:40 pm

June 2nd, 2018, 6:59 pm #9

As little as they can manage, its the shell minus the fenders minus the floors, and i cannot recall if they got new doors or reused/rebuild the stock ones... But i am prepared to count "new panels for actual minis" as "original" for the purposes of the build...

I assume all of you agree with the name of their shop though... I mean Bad Obsession fits them so fucking perfectly
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 2nd, 2018, 7:55 pm #10

Jenka wrote:One question I have is,ย  How many ounces of the original car do you think are still involved in the build at this point :).ย 
-The original car? Let's see... the roof, 3/4's of the windshield surround, about 80% of the inner door panels, the rear package tray, the rear seat "firewall", the rear side window surrounds, the hood and the trunklid. (Or 'bonnet' and 'boot lid'. ๐Ÿ˜)

That's pretty much it. The floor got replaced, the door skins got replaced, all the front sheetmetal save for the hood got replaced, the trunk floor got replaced, most of the rear seat riser got replaced, the entire firewall and lower rail of the windshield got replaced...

If I had to guess, I'd wager there's... maybe as little as 120 pounds of the original car left. ๐Ÿ˜‹ (And almost certainly no more than about 200 lb.)

In some of the Q&A bits, somebody asked why they used that particular Mini- which I took as "why start with one that was already complete and actually running and driveable (if only barely) if you're just going to strip 98% of it off? Why not start with a bare shell?"

The answer was basically "because they already had that one". I'd wager that a beater Mini like that could be had for maybe the equivalent of $200, or Nik (who actually owns the race shop) may have been given it, or taking it in on trade, or swapped it for a cheap tool, who knows? They had it, why not use it rather than going around trying to find a good, bare shell?

Same goes for the Celica. Why'd they go with that for a drivetrain? Because they already had it. ๐Ÿ˜

Doc.
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