Project Binky Ep 17 is up!

Joined: September 16th, 2014, 7:01 am

June 7th, 2018, 7:18 pm #21

They have been spot priming as they go - and they really should be priming and painting all the hidden spots like the inner fenders, firewall and under-dash as they go, so they don't have to take it all apart again.  Besides, the hidden areas are supposed to be the body color with a Flattening Agent mixed in, and you want to be done spraying all that before doing the final color coat on the outside.  Keeping it all masked is a hard enough job. 

As to finishing date? Gee, nobody asked Sissyphus when he's going to be done moving that mountain with a teaspoon...  After all that rust rework, body strengthening, and fitting a 10-pound engine in a 5-pound engine bay, it still looks like they've got a long way to go.  Unless they turn it into a full-time job I'd say years. Several years.

Might be a nice car when they get it all done - which is why they're putting the Heat and Air in, of course they'll want to drive the piss out of it.  Just to get their investment back.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 8th, 2018, 5:02 am #22

BruceBergman wrote:They have been spot priming as they go - and they really should be priming and painting all the hidden spots like the inner fenders, firewall and under-dash as they go, so they don't have to take it all apart again.
-Considering that Binky is pretty much a "build on the fly" project, they basically can't do that. Look at all the times they had to go back and rework, reweld and otherwise modify an already-modified part. The grey they're using is a "weld through" primer, which is high in zinc so that even areas under welded seams, that might not get fully painted, are still protected.

In a build like this, you never know what's going to have to come apart, or how many times- I've seen a dozen occurrences of scuffs and scratches all over a primed area. It's very, very common for a custom car like this to be built, started, road-tested, any flaws or foibles discovered and fixed, then the car dismantled, painted, plated and carefully reassembled.

It's very common to see in-progress project cars in the hot rod magazines, in bare metal, yet still assembled, running and driving, or very close to it. (Of course, the Southern California builders can get away with that, whereas the BOM guys are constantly fighting rust, as is obvious when they show you a progression of parts, or a prior attempt at a part they didn't use. The older, unused piece is virtually always skinned with surface rust.)

No, they'll get the car wired and running, first, test-drive it, make whatever modifications are necessary, and only as a nearly last step, pull it back apart to the bare shell, and prep and paint everything.

Doc.
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Joined: June 13th, 2016, 6:53 pm

June 8th, 2018, 2:28 pm #23

Gee, nobody asked Sissyphus when he's going to be done moving that mountain with a teaspoon...
That's Sisyphus, and he was tasked with rolling a boulder up a hill only to watch it roll back to the bottom just as he reaches the top.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisyphus

I personally think this is more of a Herculean labor, rather than a Sisyphean task.
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Joined: January 4th, 2015, 12:41 pm

June 8th, 2018, 2:53 pm #24

MarkFr wrote:
Gee, nobody asked Sissyphus when he's going to be done moving that mountain with a teaspoon...
That's Sisyphus, and he was tasked with rolling a boulder up a hill only to watch it roll back to the bottom just as he reaches the top.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisyphus

I personally think this is more of a Herculean labor, rather than a Sisyphean task.
Mixing metaphors is a terrible habit, and we're working on getting him to stop it, but that sort of thing takes time.  After all, Rome wasn't burned in a day.
"Vox populi, vox humbug!"
- William Tecumseh Sherman
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Joined: May 11th, 2004, 4:09 am

June 9th, 2018, 3:37 am #25

DocsMachine wrote:
BruceBergman wrote:They have been spot priming as they go - and they really should be priming and painting all the hidden spots like the inner fenders, firewall and under-dash as they go, so they don't have to take it all apart again.
-Considering that Binky is pretty much a "build on the fly" project, they basically can't do that. Look at all the times they had to go back and rework, reweld and otherwise modify an already-modified part. The grey they're using is a "weld through" primer, which is high in zinc so that even areas under welded seams, that might not get fully painted, are still protected.

In a build like this, you never know what's going to have to come apart, or how many times- I've seen a dozen occurrences of scuffs and scratches all over a primed area. It's very, very common for a custom car like this to be built, started, road-tested, any flaws or foibles discovered and fixed, then the car dismantled, painted, plated and carefully reassembled.

It's very common to see in-progress project cars in the hot rod magazines, in bare metal, yet still assembled, running and driving, or very close to it. (Of course, the Southern California builders can get away with that, whereas the BOM guys are constantly fighting rust, as is obvious when they show you a progression of parts, or a prior attempt at a part they didn't use. The older, unused piece is virtually always skinned with surface rust.)

No, they'll get the car wired and running, first, test-drive it, make whatever modifications are necessary, and only as a nearly last step, pull it back apart to the bare shell, and prep and paint everything.

Doc.
Pretty much how my project is going as well.  Figure it out as I go along.  change direction MANY times.  Cut out things I already thought were "done" and do them again, then patch up the old.
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