OT: On disaser preparedness

OT: On disaser preparedness

Webwolf
Webwolf

October 24th, 2011, 7:26 am #1

Goodness knows why I'm asking here. Maybe because backpackers don't have that will to dabble in explosions and a lathe. =P

So: If you guys had heard, which likely you hadn't, in the wake of the 7.2 earthquake out in Turkey, the San Francisco Bay Area got a pair of 4.0 shots in the same day, a couple miles S/SE from Berkeley. This has inspired me to pull out the old emergency kit, and update it accordingly. And let me tell you, holy cow, is it overdue.

First off, most the first aid supplies had to be tossed. That included the bandages. I know they're deemed "sterile unless opened", but given that what I know about adhesives that have sat for a long period of time, and what you all know about adhesives that have sat for a long period of time, well. I was at least able to salvage the ice pack, the hand warmers, the space blanket, and a few others.

Secondly, my firestarters had gone bad. Well. Insofar as bad as petroleum jelly-impregnated cotton balls can get. From what I remember the last time around, you *don't* actually want the entire cotton ball soaked in Vaseline. I knew a guy that used to melt his Vaseline down and would saute the cotton in it for a bit before packing them. From what I remember, they had a hell of a burn time, but getting them to light with a spark never did work on the first go.

Thirdly, and here's where I reach out for a little help. One of the things I'm doing is going back through and lightening everything. My 72-hour kit is all packed into an army surplus duffle bag, and after I had replaced the old sleeping bag with a much newer one, I figured why the hell not, I might as well try lightening everything else, like the stove. It's one of those models that screw onto a green one-pound canister of propane. I'm thinking of changing it up for one that uses isobutane canisters instead. Given what I know about pressurized gasses... what are the odds that if I try to build an adapter with an inline regulator, that it will blow up on me in the most painful way possible?
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smorizio
smorizio

October 24th, 2011, 10:35 am #2

look into picking up a few 55 gallon barrels place them in basement and pick up a 12v garden fountain pump and a solar battery pump or charging system.you be able to drain the water from the house/street into the tanks.they now make a few good portable camping hot water on demand system. not the cheap colman one...one used for small rv or cabins. they run or full size propane tank and 12v. pick up some water tablets from your camping store and a water putrefaction system. for cooking/food look into the freeze dried food it cost more but last longer then the mre now. mre are find if you keep them cool...the hotter they get the shorter there shelf life. for cooking look into a muilt fuel army stove....if you cant get colam gas for it at lest you can use other fuels that might still be on local store shelfs or in your home.on these small stoves the weak spot is the palastic on/off knob on the valve.they break first...if you can swap it out with one that uses metal one or pick up a spare.look into picking up a 99.00 netbook...as was posted on the news most cell (voice system are going to be over loaded) the small earth quake a few months ago. most people were using skype or other media to tell the family they were ok. look into putting a generator to power your home..it save your food did for my dad and brother when they lost power for a week here in mass. one thing to do now is check your home...see where the street shut off are for water/gas. also check that your gas/water devices have shut off on both ends. for gas look into having the line switch from the hard coper line to the flex line.
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M Squared
M Squared

October 24th, 2011, 2:14 pm #3

Goodness knows why I'm asking here. Maybe because backpackers don't have that will to dabble in explosions and a lathe. =P

So: If you guys had heard, which likely you hadn't, in the wake of the 7.2 earthquake out in Turkey, the San Francisco Bay Area got a pair of 4.0 shots in the same day, a couple miles S/SE from Berkeley. This has inspired me to pull out the old emergency kit, and update it accordingly. And let me tell you, holy cow, is it overdue.

First off, most the first aid supplies had to be tossed. That included the bandages. I know they're deemed "sterile unless opened", but given that what I know about adhesives that have sat for a long period of time, and what you all know about adhesives that have sat for a long period of time, well. I was at least able to salvage the ice pack, the hand warmers, the space blanket, and a few others.

Secondly, my firestarters had gone bad. Well. Insofar as bad as petroleum jelly-impregnated cotton balls can get. From what I remember the last time around, you *don't* actually want the entire cotton ball soaked in Vaseline. I knew a guy that used to melt his Vaseline down and would saute the cotton in it for a bit before packing them. From what I remember, they had a hell of a burn time, but getting them to light with a spark never did work on the first go.

Thirdly, and here's where I reach out for a little help. One of the things I'm doing is going back through and lightening everything. My 72-hour kit is all packed into an army surplus duffle bag, and after I had replaced the old sleeping bag with a much newer one, I figured why the hell not, I might as well try lightening everything else, like the stove. It's one of those models that screw onto a green one-pound canister of propane. I'm thinking of changing it up for one that uses isobutane canisters instead. Given what I know about pressurized gasses... what are the odds that if I try to build an adapter with an inline regulator, that it will blow up on me in the most painful way possible?
so I was watching resident evil last night and it got me thinking

Seriously, in the last couple months I have been getting that hair standing up on the back of the neck feeling myself, and have started doing some prepping of my own. I started by buying a couple books, the best of which, and one I can recommend is called "when all hell breaks loose" by Cody Lundin. He is the earth muffin guy off of Dual Survival. His book however is entertaining to read, and full of usefull information, a good place to start. Its not all about buying more ammo and building a bunker, not that I am opposed to that but there are other things to consider as well.

As for your fuel issue, I would look into a multi-fuel stove, I believe coleman makes one, that will run off of unleaded, diesel, kerosene, what have you. No guarentee you will be able to find pressurized fuel bottles in an emergency. do you really want to tote arround a pressurized fuel canister anyway?
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Surestick
Surestick

October 24th, 2011, 3:51 pm #4

Goodness knows why I'm asking here. Maybe because backpackers don't have that will to dabble in explosions and a lathe. =P

So: If you guys had heard, which likely you hadn't, in the wake of the 7.2 earthquake out in Turkey, the San Francisco Bay Area got a pair of 4.0 shots in the same day, a couple miles S/SE from Berkeley. This has inspired me to pull out the old emergency kit, and update it accordingly. And let me tell you, holy cow, is it overdue.

First off, most the first aid supplies had to be tossed. That included the bandages. I know they're deemed "sterile unless opened", but given that what I know about adhesives that have sat for a long period of time, and what you all know about adhesives that have sat for a long period of time, well. I was at least able to salvage the ice pack, the hand warmers, the space blanket, and a few others.

Secondly, my firestarters had gone bad. Well. Insofar as bad as petroleum jelly-impregnated cotton balls can get. From what I remember the last time around, you *don't* actually want the entire cotton ball soaked in Vaseline. I knew a guy that used to melt his Vaseline down and would saute the cotton in it for a bit before packing them. From what I remember, they had a hell of a burn time, but getting them to light with a spark never did work on the first go.

Thirdly, and here's where I reach out for a little help. One of the things I'm doing is going back through and lightening everything. My 72-hour kit is all packed into an army surplus duffle bag, and after I had replaced the old sleeping bag with a much newer one, I figured why the hell not, I might as well try lightening everything else, like the stove. It's one of those models that screw onto a green one-pound canister of propane. I'm thinking of changing it up for one that uses isobutane canisters instead. Given what I know about pressurized gasses... what are the odds that if I try to build an adapter with an inline regulator, that it will blow up on me in the most painful way possible?
Sure they cost a bit more (not that much) but the ability to burn pretty much any fuel would be a definite asset in a survival situation, especially something like an earthquake where you might not be able to be too picky about fuel.

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Webwolf
Webwolf

October 24th, 2011, 7:42 pm #5

If the situation was sufficiently bad, my logic tells me that I should conserve the fuel for either emergencies or needing fire quickly, and be building wood fire instead.
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Webwolf
Webwolf

October 24th, 2011, 7:44 pm #6

so I was watching resident evil last night and it got me thinking

Seriously, in the last couple months I have been getting that hair standing up on the back of the neck feeling myself, and have started doing some prepping of my own. I started by buying a couple books, the best of which, and one I can recommend is called "when all hell breaks loose" by Cody Lundin. He is the earth muffin guy off of Dual Survival. His book however is entertaining to read, and full of usefull information, a good place to start. Its not all about buying more ammo and building a bunker, not that I am opposed to that but there are other things to consider as well.

As for your fuel issue, I would look into a multi-fuel stove, I believe coleman makes one, that will run off of unleaded, diesel, kerosene, what have you. No guarentee you will be able to find pressurized fuel bottles in an emergency. do you really want to tote arround a pressurized fuel canister anyway?
Some smart cookie over there thought that writing their disaster preparedness guide as a graphic novel in the context of a zombie apocalypse would be a great idea. It was. =D
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Hans
Hans

October 24th, 2011, 11:35 pm #7

They stole not just the idea, but the tagline, from Zombiehunters.org

-Hans
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attic rat
attic rat

October 25th, 2011, 1:49 am #8

Goodness knows why I'm asking here. Maybe because backpackers don't have that will to dabble in explosions and a lathe. =P

So: If you guys had heard, which likely you hadn't, in the wake of the 7.2 earthquake out in Turkey, the San Francisco Bay Area got a pair of 4.0 shots in the same day, a couple miles S/SE from Berkeley. This has inspired me to pull out the old emergency kit, and update it accordingly. And let me tell you, holy cow, is it overdue.

First off, most the first aid supplies had to be tossed. That included the bandages. I know they're deemed "sterile unless opened", but given that what I know about adhesives that have sat for a long period of time, and what you all know about adhesives that have sat for a long period of time, well. I was at least able to salvage the ice pack, the hand warmers, the space blanket, and a few others.

Secondly, my firestarters had gone bad. Well. Insofar as bad as petroleum jelly-impregnated cotton balls can get. From what I remember the last time around, you *don't* actually want the entire cotton ball soaked in Vaseline. I knew a guy that used to melt his Vaseline down and would saute the cotton in it for a bit before packing them. From what I remember, they had a hell of a burn time, but getting them to light with a spark never did work on the first go.

Thirdly, and here's where I reach out for a little help. One of the things I'm doing is going back through and lightening everything. My 72-hour kit is all packed into an army surplus duffle bag, and after I had replaced the old sleeping bag with a much newer one, I figured why the hell not, I might as well try lightening everything else, like the stove. It's one of those models that screw onto a green one-pound canister of propane. I'm thinking of changing it up for one that uses isobutane canisters instead. Given what I know about pressurized gasses... what are the odds that if I try to build an adapter with an inline regulator, that it will blow up on me in the most painful way possible?
Some people want the "grab and go" portable kit, and others like the "stay at home" variety. Both have benefits. In the event of a disaster that destroys your home, the "grab and go" is better. Otherwise, having a prepared home is better.

My plans involve a fully-stocked tent-trailer. Any kind of RV would be nice, but you can haul a tent-trailer through some pretty rough places.

Alaska's climate would probably require something more solid than a tent...
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Eric
Eric

October 25th, 2011, 2:17 am #9

Goodness knows why I'm asking here. Maybe because backpackers don't have that will to dabble in explosions and a lathe. =P

So: If you guys had heard, which likely you hadn't, in the wake of the 7.2 earthquake out in Turkey, the San Francisco Bay Area got a pair of 4.0 shots in the same day, a couple miles S/SE from Berkeley. This has inspired me to pull out the old emergency kit, and update it accordingly. And let me tell you, holy cow, is it overdue.

First off, most the first aid supplies had to be tossed. That included the bandages. I know they're deemed "sterile unless opened", but given that what I know about adhesives that have sat for a long period of time, and what you all know about adhesives that have sat for a long period of time, well. I was at least able to salvage the ice pack, the hand warmers, the space blanket, and a few others.

Secondly, my firestarters had gone bad. Well. Insofar as bad as petroleum jelly-impregnated cotton balls can get. From what I remember the last time around, you *don't* actually want the entire cotton ball soaked in Vaseline. I knew a guy that used to melt his Vaseline down and would saute the cotton in it for a bit before packing them. From what I remember, they had a hell of a burn time, but getting them to light with a spark never did work on the first go.

Thirdly, and here's where I reach out for a little help. One of the things I'm doing is going back through and lightening everything. My 72-hour kit is all packed into an army surplus duffle bag, and after I had replaced the old sleeping bag with a much newer one, I figured why the hell not, I might as well try lightening everything else, like the stove. It's one of those models that screw onto a green one-pound canister of propane. I'm thinking of changing it up for one that uses isobutane canisters instead. Given what I know about pressurized gasses... what are the odds that if I try to build an adapter with an inline regulator, that it will blow up on me in the most painful way possible?
We had that in Korea. They even had the adapters so you could go from the small butaine cans to a full sized propane tanks. When I get home I will dig through my "from Korea" pile and see if I still have an adapter somewhere. No promises though, I have ALOT of stuff from my stay in Korea and my wife's frineds have a bad habit of borrowing stuff.

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Eric
Eric

October 25th, 2011, 2:27 am #10

look into picking up a few 55 gallon barrels place them in basement and pick up a 12v garden fountain pump and a solar battery pump or charging system.you be able to drain the water from the house/street into the tanks.they now make a few good portable camping hot water on demand system. not the cheap colman one...one used for small rv or cabins. they run or full size propane tank and 12v. pick up some water tablets from your camping store and a water putrefaction system. for cooking/food look into the freeze dried food it cost more but last longer then the mre now. mre are find if you keep them cool...the hotter they get the shorter there shelf life. for cooking look into a muilt fuel army stove....if you cant get colam gas for it at lest you can use other fuels that might still be on local store shelfs or in your home.on these small stoves the weak spot is the palastic on/off knob on the valve.they break first...if you can swap it out with one that uses metal one or pick up a spare.look into picking up a 99.00 netbook...as was posted on the news most cell (voice system are going to be over loaded) the small earth quake a few months ago. most people were using skype or other media to tell the family they were ok. look into putting a generator to power your home..it save your food did for my dad and brother when they lost power for a week here in mass. one thing to do now is check your home...see where the street shut off are for water/gas. also check that your gas/water devices have shut off on both ends. for gas look into having the line switch from the hard coper line to the flex line.
Every disaster movie shows them using car batteries or the like for power. Is that the best option if you are looking to prep for emergencies?

We already have a small generator, just looking for something as a good option to store power to keep generator use to a minimum (figure the thing has 4 plugs on it, one can be used to recharge the batteries...batteries can be used when the generator is shut off).

Also we all know that having the old school hand powered version of your favorite power tools is a must, but if you have them available what power tools would you have as your "necissary kit"?
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