OT: my question (and y'all's advice!) about tools

OT: my question (and y'all's advice!) about tools

Ketira
Ketira

November 16th, 2011, 8:40 pm #1

I had it all printed out....now I can't find the printout. Could someone quickly point me in the right direction so I can get all those suggestions, now that I'm actually HERE and pawing through Dad's tools?
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Ketira
Ketira

November 16th, 2011, 9:40 pm #2

It's <a rel="nofollow">http://www.network54.com/Forum/9013/mes ... -">here</a> in case y'all have friends that need it.

And this is a good time of year to do this; see what your friends have, what they don't have, and get gifts acc;'ordingly.


BTW - Why do y'all prefer one brand over another? Craftsman I understand; Dad's been using those for years. But why the other brands?
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Russ Kepler
Russ Kepler

November 16th, 2011, 10:36 pm #3

Sometimes it's the perceived quality or 'fit' of the tool that drives brand loyalty, other times convenience in purchase or replacement. For my machining tools the precision matters the most, then the 'feel', then the cost. I'd rather have an old Mitutoyo inside mike than a new Starrett, the former feels right and the latter does not. Similarly, a Starrett 449 depth mike feels right where the Mitutoyo does not.
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50blues
50blues

November 17th, 2011, 1:20 am #4

It's <a rel="nofollow">http://www.network54.com/Forum/9013/mes ... -">here</a> in case y'all have friends that need it.

And this is a good time of year to do this; see what your friends have, what they don't have, and get gifts acc;'ordingly.


BTW - Why do y'all prefer one brand over another? Craftsman I understand; Dad's been using those for years. But why the other brands?
With some tools as stated before accuracy is very important. The cheap knock off tools just are not close enough.

The other is warrranty. For an example, torx bit sockets. I do autobody work for a living and am always breaking torx bits. Your cheappy one piece sockets don't fit as well aren't as strong and are hard to warranty. With a snap on or mac socket they come to your door, put a new bit in it, for no charge. That you cannot beat.
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Z50
Z50

November 17th, 2011, 1:33 am #5

It's <a rel="nofollow">http://www.network54.com/Forum/9013/mes ... -">here</a> in case y'all have friends that need it.

And this is a good time of year to do this; see what your friends have, what they don't have, and get gifts acc;'ordingly.


BTW - Why do y'all prefer one brand over another? Craftsman I understand; Dad's been using those for years. But why the other brands?
Craftsman was a very good quality tool with the best possible warranty. Sears figured that they could focus entirely on the warranty aspect and now the tool quality sucks.

Good tools are lighter for their strength because they use better quality metal and therefore need less of it to do a given job. Less metal means things like sockets fit in smaller recessed holes and wrenches can turn farther without running into obstructions. Other details like full polished finishes make the tools significantly easier to clean when you are done and much harder for rust to get a foothold. Tighter tolerances on wrenches will reduce the likelihood of destroying fasteners and your knuckles due to the wrench slipping.

As far as a specific brand, decide the level of quality you need then find a way to get the wrenches at that quality. If you decide consumer (Craftsman/Kobalt/Ace) then decide which store is most likely to help you when you need an exchange. If you go professional (Mac/Snap-On) find out if there is a local truck that is willing to work with you or if it is in your best interest to look online (some dealers won't work with nonprofessionals and others won't warranty unless you are still buying from them) If you go with no-name generic tools then about anything you grab will get the same results so price is probably your best bet.

Final parting wisdom: If you don't have the basic tool kit and you need to buy, you ought to seriously consider buying used. Every tinkerer has the same basic tools and we all die eventually so our tools get passed around. When someone gets someone else's tools they keep the stuff they didn't have and the other stuff gets re-gifted, sold, or thrown in a packrat style pile. This means that the basic tools that most people already have are easy to find and cheep on the used market.
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MephitMark
MephitMark

November 18th, 2011, 4:08 am #6

It's <a rel="nofollow">http://www.network54.com/Forum/9013/mes ... -">here</a> in case y'all have friends that need it.

And this is a good time of year to do this; see what your friends have, what they don't have, and get gifts acc;'ordingly.


BTW - Why do y'all prefer one brand over another? Craftsman I understand; Dad's been using those for years. But why the other brands?
I'm well known by my siblings and mom as having a fix-it bag. When I go visit my mother (weekly) I almost always bring my US army style tool bag. Bugger weighs in around 20-30 pounds but it hold a load. Pockets are handy for dedicated items.

As for the tools mentioned, that is a great start. I will recommend for the ratchet getting a stubby flex head. They are great for getting in tight places. Something else is a combination 1/4" drive and hex drive ratchet. You can get some great torque for stubborn nuts/screws. The slip jaw pliers are a must as pointed out. I do suggest getting two though, both a straight, and curved jaws. I also recommene a compact type of hack saw as well.

For electrical testing a general type multimeter will suffice. But a neon voltage indicator can be very useful.

One other odd tool that I am surprised no one has mentioned that I have several, are locking forceps. I have found uses in the crazier times. Not to mention they have uses as a third hand at times.

Heh, perhaps every one could post a picture of they tool box/bag as a bragging post!!
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Ketira
Ketira

November 18th, 2011, 4:55 pm #7

....I would, level by level. (Mine's a tool box with a compartments in the top as well as trays inside.

I think the camera may become my next item to go on my Housewares Amazon Gift List, once I decide on a brand as I know I could vlog some nice places around here.... or the cat. (For those of you with such Lists, Amazon's doing their "Wish List Giveaway" again! :D )
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MephitMark
MephitMark

November 18th, 2011, 6:51 pm #8

I've been a user of the craigslist for many years now. Though as anyone here can testify to, you have to be careful of the scammers. Not to mention, it is the new dumping ground for theives.

And as for brand name of the camera to choose from? That is a sticky one. In part to what you want to spend and what you want to do with the camera? I've had fairly good luck with HP for a simple point and shoot camera for basic use. Nickels should be a better source with the digital SLR rigs. I've only used the old fashioned film SLR myself.
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GladMech
GladMech

November 19th, 2011, 6:50 pm #9

I had it all printed out....now I can't find the printout. Could someone quickly point me in the right direction so I can get all those suggestions, now that I'm actually HERE and pawing through Dad's tools?
I don't think anyone has made this point: The tool should fit the job.
The basic rule of the packrat is, "If you don't have a place to put it, you can't have it."
Otherwise, if it's free, keep it!
If the tools are plentiful and cheap (as in, inherited, or flea market, pawn shop, etc...), make up a separate kit for each type of job so the tools can be appropriately located and easy to carry.
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Bruce Bergman
Bruce Bergman

November 19th, 2011, 11:19 pm #10

I'm well known by my siblings and mom as having a fix-it bag. When I go visit my mother (weekly) I almost always bring my US army style tool bag. Bugger weighs in around 20-30 pounds but it hold a load. Pockets are handy for dedicated items.

As for the tools mentioned, that is a great start. I will recommend for the ratchet getting a stubby flex head. They are great for getting in tight places. Something else is a combination 1/4" drive and hex drive ratchet. You can get some great torque for stubborn nuts/screws. The slip jaw pliers are a must as pointed out. I do suggest getting two though, both a straight, and curved jaws. I also recommene a compact type of hack saw as well.

For electrical testing a general type multimeter will suffice. But a neon voltage indicator can be very useful.

One other odd tool that I am surprised no one has mentioned that I have several, are locking forceps. I have found uses in the crazier times. Not to mention they have uses as a third hand at times.

Heh, perhaps every one could post a picture of they tool box/bag as a bragging post!!
I need to get a Diesel next time so I can get that mileage number up.

Only real suggestion is, break down your tools by job operations. I keep the "everyday" Electrician stuff on the truck, and all the specialty tools are at home in bags or boxes by specialty.

If you know there's Telephone or CATV or Data on today's schedule you grab that toolbag, a box or three of wire, and the box with the phone jacks and wallplates or the Coax Splitters and patch cords.

HVAC/Refrigeration is another pile, with a couple of toolbags, the Recovery and Vacuum Pump, recovery bottles, refrigerant bottles, etc.

Carpentry is yet another sub-specialty with the air tools and nails and compressor and Drywall Square and screw-gun...

You can't do everything at once - any one will fill the back of the truck. One day you need the regular electrical stuff to change the panel, then go home. The next day you bring all the carpentry stuff to close up the hole, and go home. Next day you bring the Cement Mixer and the Stucco Mix to put on the Scratch Coat...
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