OT: Medicine is amazing

Joined: October 1st, 2014, 8:46 pm

May 14th, 2018, 5:44 pm #1

I'm not sure why i feel like i need to post this. I'm just amazed by it.

I've not seen some of my best friends for years. Over the past year we've been reconnecting. Gambling trips and going to see trailer park boys at red rocks. Last fall my friend (45ish) was having heart problems and was on some medication.


Fast forward, I didn't see him all winter until 4/20 and we went to see super troopers. He said the meds didn't work and he was now in the transplant list. He had a box hooked to him and a beeper. He looked bad!

Less than a week later I got a text in the middle of the night. "got the call! I headed to the hospital!". I was terrified, but was glad I'd gotten to see him right before.

They did the transplant in like 3hrs. They had him stand up and walk a few steps that night. He spent 6 days in the hospital and is home. They said his heart" looked like shit" and was operating at about 20%capacity.

I'm utterly amazed at how quickly it all progressed and the for the lack of a better term "ease" of it. I know it's far from easy, but watching from the outside it was like he just had routine surgery.

I had a hip replacement and was scared shitless, but I can't imagine a heart.

Now I tease him saying I've got robot parts & he probably got the heart of a serial killer.

Anyway, not sure why I posted this!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 14th, 2018, 6:16 pm #2

Yep. I know somebody that recently went through a cancer diagnosis. One of the biggest fears was the chemotherapy- everyone was expecting the nasty, toxic stuff that makes your hair fall out, makes you nauseous, etc. (And to be fair, there are kinds that do that- chemo has a wide variety of drugs, that range from relatively mild to "at this point we're hoping the tumor dies before the chemo kills him")

But that wasn't the case. He went through six or eight weeks of popping a handful of pills a day, no nausea, no illness, no hair loss, no loss of energy, etc.

Better still, between the chemo and the radiation, the tumor was already dead and shrinking when they went in to take it out.

Yeah, unfortunately not everyone has it that easy (there's hundreds of different kinds of "cancer" and they don't all react the same) but there are successes out there.

Oh, and the trick to this stuff, as I understand it, was that while it was effective on it's own (whatever the drug was) it gets "activated", in effect, by the radiation therapy. So while it's circulating through the body and hopefully knocking out the errant cancer cell before it can grow, the stuff that's accumulated in the tumor is "kicked up a notch" by the radiation, increasing its effectiveness in that one targeted area.

I thought whoever came up that that little idea- or discovered it if it were accidental- was a pretty clever sort.

Doc.
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Joined: September 12th, 2014, 3:32 am

May 15th, 2018, 12:00 am #3

My mother has, over the last 4-5 years, had two operations on her back to fuse vertebrae that had worn out. She has a bit of titanium and steel  holding her back together now. Prior to that, she was headed toward being wheelchair bound because her problems were keeping her from walking properly.  For the first round (lower back), the surgeon said that it was the worst case he had the entire year- this was in November- and that if it had gone much further, she would have definitely been reduced to a wheelchair for mobility. The upper was done two years (to the day!) later, and that got her feeling in her arms back- she had been suffering neuropathy in them.  She still has off days, but she's still mobile, and tries to be as active as she can be.

It's fantastic living in the future.
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