Now this is a lathe...

Now this is a lathe...

Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

June 7th, 2012, 11:36 am #1

It's American made, in good condition, needs nothing more than a good cleaning, has some reasonable tooling and it's for sale less than 30 miles away.



It's also two and a half tons, ten horsepower, has a twenty-inch swing and comes with an 18" four-jaw that weighs 150 pounds. Note the rolls of masking tape on the feed selector at the lower left.

It's also really expensive. Significantly less than any new import I can find that has similar capacities, but still spendy.

I don't really need a machine this big, I definitely don't have the room for it, and I'm not even sure my floor can hold it. So why do I still really, really want it?

Doc.
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Squirlly
Squirlly

June 7th, 2012, 1:00 pm #2

Nice Topic

-Tim
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Chris
Chris

June 7th, 2012, 1:59 pm #3

It's American made, in good condition, needs nothing more than a good cleaning, has some reasonable tooling and it's for sale less than 30 miles away.



It's also two and a half tons, ten horsepower, has a twenty-inch swing and comes with an 18" four-jaw that weighs 150 pounds. Note the rolls of masking tape on the feed selector at the lower left.

It's also really expensive. Significantly less than any new import I can find that has similar capacities, but still spendy.

I don't really need a machine this big, I definitely don't have the room for it, and I'm not even sure my floor can hold it. So why do I still really, really want it?

Doc.
It looks like something from the 50s... or previous.

Probably in the age where top quality machinery tools
truly existed... and functioned.

That looks like a fine piece of machinery that probably
still works like it did back then... especially when it
has been maintained properly.

I wonder if lathe requires a shed and a power source...?

No, I don't want it, Doc. You probably can build a shed
for it, but like you said, the moving of it would be quite
the gripe.
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Atomicvole
Atomicvole

June 7th, 2012, 3:07 pm #4

Back in 2007 on the Monarch section of Practical machineist, one gentleman restored an old Monarch 10EE that was built in 1942.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/mo ... post319700
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OmniMech
OmniMech

June 7th, 2012, 3:33 pm #5

It's American made, in good condition, needs nothing more than a good cleaning, has some reasonable tooling and it's for sale less than 30 miles away.



It's also two and a half tons, ten horsepower, has a twenty-inch swing and comes with an 18" four-jaw that weighs 150 pounds. Note the rolls of masking tape on the feed selector at the lower left.

It's also really expensive. Significantly less than any new import I can find that has similar capacities, but still spendy.

I don't really need a machine this big, I definitely don't have the room for it, and I'm not even sure my floor can hold it. So why do I still really, really want it?

Doc.
I had a friend in Vancouver who was into building and overclocking computers. And I mean seriously overclocking them. He told me, once, that if any of the seven case fans in his system died, he had to shut down his PC or it would overheat.
Well, the inevitable happened, one day, and Brandon went a little too far in overclocking a video card...burned it right out. Brandon went out and bought two video cards ($300 apiece. Construction jobs paid well) to replace the one he fried. When grilled him about the second card...why would you buy two, do you even need the second card? His reply was "No. But I might."
Do you need a lathe that big? "No...but I might." =)
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Russ Kepler
Russ Kepler

June 7th, 2012, 5:02 pm #6

Back in 2007 on the Monarch section of Practical machineist, one gentleman restored an old Monarch 10EE that was built in 1942.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/mo ... post319700
I went down that road as well - bought a beater lathe (saved from being tipped into a dumpster), got the mechanicals and electricals working, took it apart and had the bed ground and the redid everything on top, painting as I went.

This is after I found the Monarch tool cabinet and did the panel work and such to match my 10EE:



A lot of lathes I see people put a lot of time into simply aren't work the effort - it's silly to put $4K into a lathe worth maybe $1200. But the 10EE is worth the effort, it's a real pleasure to have such repeatability in turning that you only mic every few parts "just in case".
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Russ Kepler
Russ Kepler

June 7th, 2012, 5:04 pm #7

I had a friend in Vancouver who was into building and overclocking computers. And I mean seriously overclocking them. He told me, once, that if any of the seven case fans in his system died, he had to shut down his PC or it would overheat.
Well, the inevitable happened, one day, and Brandon went a little too far in overclocking a video card...burned it right out. Brandon went out and bought two video cards ($300 apiece. Construction jobs paid well) to replace the one he fried. When grilled him about the second card...why would you buy two, do you even need the second card? His reply was "No. But I might."
Do you need a lathe that big? "No...but I might." =)
No Tiny
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Maker of Toys
Maker of Toys

June 7th, 2012, 6:52 pm #8

. . . the bigger the machine.

Or at least that was the truism when I was in the experimental physics field.

Seriously. . . have a nice search on "large optic diamond turning machine" (or just go to: https://www.llnl.gov/str/April01/pdfs/04_01.2.pdf for a publicity fluff piece).

At one point, the precision claimed for that brute was claimed to be better than the best measuring tool available. (Which sparked a sort of arms race between the tool operators and the metrology team. . .) The work envelope was/is something like 2% of the total volume of the tool. There was a requirement that if an operator had to go physically touch anything on the actual tool, there was an extended wait period while the thermal and humidity disturbance from his/her visit propagated through the room, tool and workpiece before machining could be restarted.

The thing was on a truly impressively thick slab laid over a set of equally impressive compacted, washed sand sub-grade in a cleanroom inside a (very tightly controlled) environmental chamber in a dedicated building. The thing is an absolute edifice!



Things haven't changed much in the truism, either. . . Witness the LHC for further proof.
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Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

June 7th, 2012, 8:21 pm #9

It looks like something from the 50s... or previous.

Probably in the age where top quality machinery tools
truly existed... and functioned.

That looks like a fine piece of machinery that probably
still works like it did back then... especially when it
has been maintained properly.

I wonder if lathe requires a shed and a power source...?

No, I don't want it, Doc. You probably can build a shed
for it, but like you said, the moving of it would be quite
the gripe.
No firm number on the year-of-manufacture, but Lathes.co.uk suggests it's a '50s or possibly '60s "Mascot", which is actually a Colchester brand. As I understand it, Colchester is/was a UK maker, and the Clausings were made here in the US under contract. The tag on the headstock says something like "Made by the Atlas Tool Company" or somesuch.

It was originally a 17" (or as Colchester calls it, an 8.5" center height) but it's had riser blocks installed to give it a 20-inch-and-change swing. I have no idea if the risers are a factory thing, or somebody in it's almost certainly long history fabbed them in-shop.

According to the specs, it weighs just a tic over 5100 pounds (2-1/2 tons) has a 3-1/8" thru-spindle bore, an L2 spindle nose and might even have an english/metric gearbox.

No, I'm probably not going to buy it. While I have had the occasional job that a nice big honkin' lathe would have made faster and easier (or even just possible) the vast majority of my work is still small stuff. I don't need a 20" swing to bore out a barrel for Freak inserts.

But I may have semi-regular access to it if and when those occasional big jobs arise, in exchange for some work on other machines.

Doc.

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akpirate
akpirate

June 8th, 2012, 7:59 am #10

It's American made, in good condition, needs nothing more than a good cleaning, has some reasonable tooling and it's for sale less than 30 miles away.



It's also two and a half tons, ten horsepower, has a twenty-inch swing and comes with an 18" four-jaw that weighs 150 pounds. Note the rolls of masking tape on the feed selector at the lower left.

It's also really expensive. Significantly less than any new import I can find that has similar capacities, but still spendy.

I don't really need a machine this big, I definitely don't have the room for it, and I'm not even sure my floor can hold it. So why do I still really, really want it?

Doc.
eh, you should see the lathe that the Palmer machine shop has sitting on its floor.

Next time I need to give them a visit i should ask permission to take some pics of their equipment and post them. One of their big lathes can fit an entire truck axle in with room to spare.

And If memory serves me right they have at least three of the converted old belt driven drill presses of various sizes in different parts of the shop.
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