New Tormach machines!

Joined: October 1st, 2014, 2:49 pm

June 12th, 2018, 1:03 pm #31

Dude, all machines break. Even our HAAS VF2 shit itself recently. It destroyed its spindle all on its own. Long story short however, HAAS covered the repairs under warranty despite it being out of warranty by over a year.
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Joined: April 15th, 2003, 12:28 pm

June 12th, 2018, 3:16 pm #32

Hmmm.. when it comes to CNC, anything I buy now has servos. The occasional brownout we get here has made that feature (the machine knowing where it was when it cut out) worth its cost many times over. 

Im just dealing with lasers on that, but I would kill for my printers (like the $30K flatbed) to know where they cut out at when connectivity was lost) to have the same abilities. IF I was running any machining centers instead of farming that stuff out, I would be all over it at just 2K more. I think over a year or 2, it would pay for itself. 

Although, entry prices and budgets are very real to me as well. Im looking at a 9K label printer right now. A freaking inkjet label machine... that can spit them out at 8 a second. It will be super helpful, and drop some costs, but thats a heavy investment. 
__
Designer / maker of Jeep gauges and assorted automotive bits and baubles.
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Joined: July 10th, 2016, 2:02 pm

Today, 7:47 am #33

One of the things I have always liked about Doc's accounts of his machine refit/repair fits, is that he has never objected to upgrading something well beyond what the manufacturer considered worthwhile.  I find that admirable.

If the Tormach mill perhaps isn't as good as you consider worthwhile, wait.  You haven't seen yet what Doc's probably going to do to it.

I mean, its speed etc will probably never be up to the Haas, but a lot of those flaws you mentioned are fixable.

My relatively pathetic mini-mill came with a LOT of flaws, and I found ways to fix many of them.  Like, a real spindle motor instead of a router, and feedback channels from encoders on the ends of the screws, and filling the broad fiberglass tubes of the frame with epoxy putty, and reinforcing the gantry, and adding a tooltip sensor for setting the z-axis, etc.  I turned it into a much better machine than it was, although I know it'll never be in the same class as real machine tools.  But anyway, the point is that now the results of running it make me happy, and they didn't really when the mini-mill was new.

Doc is starting with something a lot more awesome than I did, and he's got the chops and the machinery already that he doesn't need to limit himself to the relatively minor kind of mods I made.  So don't assume that it's going to remain inadequate, in his hands.  At least, not inadequate to his needs.
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