Magnifying in the workshop

Joined: March 8th, 2004, 11:48 pm

September 6th, 2018, 12:22 am #1

As I am sure none you are aware, I am old and somewhat broken. So I have been looking into various magnifying solutions, especially video cameras hooked to TV screens. Anybody have any relevant experience?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 6th, 2018, 12:49 am #2

To do what? Read? Work? Fix? Weld?

For reading, I see guys simply use an iPad or Kindle, and download the text for direct reading.

For reading of texts that aren't easily available online, or for picture/laden books, there's any number of webcams that can be connected to an iPad, tablet, laptop, desktop or even big-screen TV, to display a usable image. Not all cams can magnify well, so homework would be needed there.

For actual work, it'll depend on what you're doing. For watch repair or gnat vasectomies or something, you'll need one of those magnifying headsets like the jewelers and modelers use. For larger stuff, a set of simple reading glasses should work.

For doing machine work, plenty of people have adapted microscopes- both optical and digital- to their machine tools.Point in fact, some manufacturers of small, high=accuracy lathes, like Levin and Schaublin, offered factory microscopes and mounts.

Beyond that, there's always the replacement eye surgery like we saw in Minority Report (spiders not included) or just give up and go with the flow. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: March 8th, 2004, 11:48 pm

September 6th, 2018, 1:25 am #3

Tig welding is the main issue. After that making sure the drill point is on the punch mark, looking at surface scratches, and such things. I have no problems reading since I can move the book where I need it, but after 5 back surgeries I can no longer bend to get my face close enough to see work that has to remain stationary. Also, sticking your face into the drill press usually results in ungood things.
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Joined: March 8th, 2004, 11:48 pm

September 6th, 2018, 1:29 am #4

I can't make a link but there are video camera microscopes that display on TV screens. I am thinking that one of those can be moved to what I need to see then I can check the monitor to see what is going on.
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Joined: June 2nd, 2015, 3:34 am

September 6th, 2018, 1:36 am #5

My wife complains most of the welders she works with are blind so I'm not sure what the problem is here?
It is possible to commit no mistakes and still lose. That is not a weakness. That is life.
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Joined: January 11th, 2016, 8:57 pm

September 6th, 2018, 1:50 am #6

My father was legally blind, but enjoyed reading, so I got an eBay video camera that was cheap because it ate tapes. It was a Panasonic NV-25, used tapes, came with a remote control, and had about a 24:1 optical zoom. I rigged up a stand that clamped onto the rear of his computer desk, and held the camera more or less over the middle of his keyboard, but high enough so he didn't bang his head on it, and wired the A/V output of the camera into his monitor's A/V input.

Being a consumer video camera, it could auto-focus, and he could zoom in so that the page of his paperback could fill the width of the 26" screen of his monitor. He could also use it for sorting out his day's tablets, reading junk-mail and bills, and lots of other little jobs that were problematic to the vision-impaired.

When he died, it ended up in my shed, so I mounted it on an old photographic enlarger stand and hooked it into the computer monitor. It can fill the screen sideways with something 65mm / 2 1/2" long, and if I fit the after-market macro lens on the front, a 7400 IC will occupy the entire width. Handy for checking my soldering these days, as my eyes aren't quite as good as they once were.

Some pictures of the current setup below, if it all works out.

enlarger 1.jpg ^ General setup with a little PCB.

enlarger 2.jpg ^ PCB on screen for inspection (NOT maximum zoom, no macro lens.)

enlarger 3.jpg ^ Camera 'temporary' attachment to stand (Only been 2 years - no rush!)

enlarger 4.jpg ^ Front view of the stand.

enlarger 5.jpg ^ maximum zoom, no macro lens - 62mm to fill screen.
Breakfast.com halted. Cereal port not ready.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 6th, 2018, 3:09 am #7

Mark-T wrote:Tig welding is the main issue.
-Oh, that one's easy. Just go up to a 400 or 500-amp handpiece, use 3/8" tungstens, and start using 1/4" filler wire. That makes the whole thing easy to see, as long as you can grind a 1/2" fillet into 22-ga sheet. 
😁
Realistically, you might look into medical eyepieces, like dentists and doctors use (sort of a miniature set of binoculars, or opera glasses) and see about mounting those to the outside of your helmet/lens.
Doc.
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Joined: July 12th, 2017, 12:19 am

September 6th, 2018, 11:58 am #8

I just got a magnifier like my dentist has that Doc just mentioned. It's made by these people: https://rosemicrosolutions.myshopify.com/

I do N scale model railroading and have been using it to build turnouts (i.e. track switches). I have the 3.5x model focused at 16", which means that I'm not hunched over the desk like I was with my Optivisor. I can sit up straight and work comfortably. This was $300+ with shipping, but it's great. I've been very happy with it.

Tim
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Joined: March 8th, 2004, 11:48 pm

September 6th, 2018, 12:58 pm #9

The magnifying glasses have to be a specific distance from your eyes don't they? Not sure how well that would work with a welding mask. And my regular glasses.

I will have to look into trying an older video camera like mentioned above. The cameras I have looked at so far (regular digital cameras and my phone) won't magnify close objects but I can look.
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Joined: September 6th, 2018, 1:11 pm

September 6th, 2018, 1:14 pm #10

How about a Stereo  microscope?

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