Joined: October 2nd, 2014, 6:07 am

September 6th, 2018, 3:00 pm #11

if you have a smart tv or a windows 10 pc a lot of phones and hardware now lets you cast to tv and pc. you may be able to use one of those go pros and be able to cast to a pc or tv with it over bluetooth.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 6th, 2018, 3:04 pm #12

Stereo microscopes are old hat. These days they're either quadraphonic or even surround-sound. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: November 30th, 2014, 1:36 am

September 6th, 2018, 3:13 pm #13

I have several solutions - for close work on the lathe or mill I use an Optivisor.  I also have fixed focus glasses set to a short focus that are useful when welding (I have 26" for the computer and 16" for welding).  They're cheap from one of the the overseas suppliers (I've used Zenni but others would work).  An added advantage with that is that I don't put the expensive glasses at risk (progressive lens with multiple coatings - oleophobic and hydrophobic plus scratch resistant).

More concerning to me is the weight of some tooling.  Moving a 12" rotary table is now impossible without mechanical support and I can see the time that moving the 6" Kurt or the 8" rotary will be a problem.  Some of the lathe chucks (like the 8" 3 jaw Buck) are getting kind of hard to mount.  For all these I expect to build a stand with a Sky Hook to assist with the movement.  The Sky Hook is currently mounted on the welding table to assist out there along with the gantry crane with chainfall.

With these improvements I'll likely be able to continue 'normal' work for another decade and maybe something smaller for one more decade.  That's longer than I likely have, TBH.

(And to think I used to sling my 200# anvil around by just picking it up and moving where I wanted it...)
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Joined: March 8th, 2004, 11:48 pm

September 6th, 2018, 5:11 pm #14

fbohner63 wrote: How about a stereo microscope
I wouldn't be able to use that for welding plus you have to bend over those things. My back is full of rods so I don't bend very well anymore.
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Joined: July 12th, 2017, 12:19 am

September 6th, 2018, 5:16 pm #15

I'd be tempted to try something like this: https://www.globalindustrial.com/p/offi ... gJNnPD_BwE

You can move it around as you like. I'd recommend putting something clear and tough in front of the lens to protect it.

Tim
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Joined: July 12th, 2017, 12:19 am

September 6th, 2018, 5:17 pm #16

Damn, it buggered the link. Let's see if this one works better. https://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywo ... paz8_b_p37
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Joined: January 11th, 2016, 8:57 pm

September 7th, 2018, 12:07 am #17

Mark-T wrote: The magnifying glasses have to be a specific distance from your eyes don't they? Not sure how well that would work with a welding mask. And my regular glasses.

I will have to look into trying an older video camera like mentioned above. The cameras I have looked at so far (regular digital cameras and my phone) won't magnify close objects but I can look.
I suspect welding flash and UV would kill the camera fairly smartly, and it probably wouldn't be much use. But for ordinary fine work, for those of us with not-so-hot eyesight, the above system is great, because you don't have to hunch over the work with a magnifying headset on, or peer thru a dirty great magnifying lens. With an inexpensive set of eBay macro lenses, you can get in for a really close look.

macro-1.jpg

I've fitted the x10 macro from a Vivtar set, and they give the following images on the Panasonic camera....


macro-2.jpg

^ A 2mm drill, checking the rake is adequate....

macro 3.jpg
^ A rather worn 1/4' BSW tap;

Macro-4.jpg
^ And the 1/2" long silicon chip in yesterday's photos.

IMHO, using a consumer-type video camera is probably a better bargain than a USB cam as (a) it doesn't need the PC on; (b) it autofocuses, and the remote lets you zoom etc without touching the camera (it's very sensitive at this level of magnification,) and (c) they have excellent optics compared to a USB web-cam; and (d) they're dirt cheap if you don't mind one where the imaging system still works, but it has a tape transport problem or dead / dying batteries.
Breakfast.com halted. Cereal port not ready.
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Joined: March 8th, 2004, 11:48 pm

September 7th, 2018, 1:48 am #18

You have to put the camera behind a welding mask to keep from burning it out. A cheap harbor freight one would be okay I think.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 7th, 2018, 5:38 am #19

The problem with using a camera behind a welding lens- electronic or otherwise- is the reaction time. It usually takes a few moments for the camera aperture to react- if you're doing something like TIG welding, it can be a pain, but it's manageable. Usually you have a few moments before the puddle properly forms anyway.

But for MIG welding, you can pretty easily run the bead off track, or "pile up" too much at the beginning of the weld before the image clears enough for you to see what you're doing.

I think realistically, you'd be best off using optical magnification rather than digital magnification.

Doc.
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Joined: September 14th, 2018, 8:17 pm

September 14th, 2018, 9:00 pm #20

DocsMachine wrote: Realistically, you might look into medical eyepieces, like dentists and doctors use (sort of a miniature set of binoculars, or opera glasses) and see about mounting those to the outside of your helmet/lens.
Doc.
Be prepared for some serious sticker shock - I enquired from my dentist about the headset she uses, as I thought it would be great for endmill inspection - she told me they were 3500 dollars a set. You can buy a generic Chinese made headset off of Amazon for under 50 bucks
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