Looking for Insulation Advice

Looking for Insulation Advice

Max
Max

December 11th, 2011, 2:43 am #1

I've got a smoker I'm trying to insulate and make more temperature stable. It's charcoal fired, rectangular in shape, roughly 20" square by 36" tall. I've also been experimenting with converting it to an electric heat source but at this point I think I'm loosing to much heat through the walls to make it run well in any configuration. I live in San Francisco CA and it's 70% humidity on a dry day here so rot will be a concern. What I'm thinking is to use high temp glue to attach some sort of insulating paneling to the outside of the smoker. Ideally something either foiled or solid (not loose fiberglass) so that it's fairly water proof. I would also like it to be able to handle up to 3-400 degrees Fahrenheit if possible, though if there's an ideal product that can do 250 or so that would be a fine compromise. Can anyone recommend any products that you think might work for what I'm trying to do without spending enough to just warrant buying another smoker?
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50blues
50blues

December 11th, 2011, 4:15 am #2

is it portable or a stationary unit? If stationary bricks would be an easy and not to expensive option.
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Max
Max

December 11th, 2011, 6:43 am #3

It's made of fairly light gauge sheet metal and I do move it around (away from the house) to use it. I don't think it needs to be a particularly thick or even efficient insulation. Just enough to even the temp out a bit.
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Bruce Bergman
Bruce Bergman

December 11th, 2011, 7:47 pm #4

Wonderboard is concrete between two layers of fiberglas mesh, you could try a layer of that and see.

Or if you can keep it out of the rain or covered, a layer of Kaowool mineral wool (oil furnace firebox insulation) with another layer of light sheet metal on the outside.

Firebrick isn't so much insulation as thermal mass to moderate the flow.
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MephitMark
MephitMark

December 12th, 2011, 5:44 am #5

I've got a smoker I'm trying to insulate and make more temperature stable. It's charcoal fired, rectangular in shape, roughly 20" square by 36" tall. I've also been experimenting with converting it to an electric heat source but at this point I think I'm loosing to much heat through the walls to make it run well in any configuration. I live in San Francisco CA and it's 70% humidity on a dry day here so rot will be a concern. What I'm thinking is to use high temp glue to attach some sort of insulating paneling to the outside of the smoker. Ideally something either foiled or solid (not loose fiberglass) so that it's fairly water proof. I would also like it to be able to handle up to 3-400 degrees Fahrenheit if possible, though if there's an ideal product that can do 250 or so that would be a fine compromise. Can anyone recommend any products that you think might work for what I'm trying to do without spending enough to just warrant buying another smoker?
For home repairs I have a propane torch, and to keep from burning the house down, there is available a small sheet of insulation mounted on some heavier aluminum foil. Thing is this is only about 6" x 10". I'm not sure what the insulation material is honestly, resembles a dense fiblerglass, but feels more like mineral fiber.

Okay a very quick Google came up with somethings of interest:

http://www.rsifibre.com/about-high-temp ... lation.php

http://www.ceramicfiberonline.com/home.php
They have board material rated to 2300°F which probably exceeds your needs, but it will never burn on you.

http://www.fiberfrax.com/ Another maker of high temp. insulations.
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weber
weber

December 12th, 2011, 1:36 pm #6

I've got a smoker I'm trying to insulate and make more temperature stable. It's charcoal fired, rectangular in shape, roughly 20" square by 36" tall. I've also been experimenting with converting it to an electric heat source but at this point I think I'm loosing to much heat through the walls to make it run well in any configuration. I live in San Francisco CA and it's 70% humidity on a dry day here so rot will be a concern. What I'm thinking is to use high temp glue to attach some sort of insulating paneling to the outside of the smoker. Ideally something either foiled or solid (not loose fiberglass) so that it's fairly water proof. I would also like it to be able to handle up to 3-400 degrees Fahrenheit if possible, though if there's an ideal product that can do 250 or so that would be a fine compromise. Can anyone recommend any products that you think might work for what I'm trying to do without spending enough to just warrant buying another smoker?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Steiner-Industr ... 4cfc5f129d

We use these cut up to size for brewing beer to help keep the temp stable. Should definitely work for your application too.
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ed
ed

December 16th, 2011, 9:15 pm #7

I've got a smoker I'm trying to insulate and make more temperature stable. It's charcoal fired, rectangular in shape, roughly 20" square by 36" tall. I've also been experimenting with converting it to an electric heat source but at this point I think I'm loosing to much heat through the walls to make it run well in any configuration. I live in San Francisco CA and it's 70% humidity on a dry day here so rot will be a concern. What I'm thinking is to use high temp glue to attach some sort of insulating paneling to the outside of the smoker. Ideally something either foiled or solid (not loose fiberglass) so that it's fairly water proof. I would also like it to be able to handle up to 3-400 degrees Fahrenheit if possible, though if there's an ideal product that can do 250 or so that would be a fine compromise. Can anyone recommend any products that you think might work for what I'm trying to do without spending enough to just warrant buying another smoker?
Cheap 22 or 24 gauge sheet steel should be something you can bend using wood and form a double-wall for the cooker. Don't buy it from home depot. Buy it in bulk from your local industrial metal supply. Cut with tin snips. Form with wood and hammer. Attach with blind rivets (much quicker than bolts.)

No danger of random bizarre materials falling into your meat.
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