Longtime lurker, first time PB marker owner--Tippmann 98C overhaul?

Longtime lurker, first time PB marker owner--Tippmann 98C overhaul?

ABTOMAT
ABTOMAT

June 17th, 2012, 1:54 am #1

I've lurked here for years, but from the machinist/firearm/webcomic sides of things. Stopped by a yard sale today and found a Tippmann 98C with two barrels, hopper, 12oz tank, and two rotted masks for $45. I'm a sucker for any kind of projectile-shooting device so I decided to indulge my inner polar bear and bring this thing home.

So what's the normal procedure for overhauling an old mechanical marker that's been rotting in a kid's closet for five years? I already have it stripped down and I've cleaned out the corrosion and paint. I assume O-rings all-around are suggested, right? Anything else I should know?

What's the best place to order seal kits from? And do welding or extinguisher shops hydro little PB tanks or do I have to find a PB store?
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OmniMech
OmniMech

June 17th, 2012, 3:35 pm #2

The cool thing about 98's is that they're damn near impossible to permanently break. Not that it can't be done, but I doubt that sitting in a closet for 5 years is going to kill one.

First of all, I'd recommend checking the internet for the owners manual. You can go to Tippmann's website (Tippmanusa.com, IIRC) and download a PDF of the manual. Go through it a few times, and it will give you the basic Care and Feeding of the 98. There's newer models available...but for the most part 98's are 98's.

O-ring kits can be found at just about any paintball shop, or ordered from websites. Be aware, there's two separate kits you can order. The first is just the o-rings. Nothing else...just the 'rings. The second is more of a 'first aid kit' for the marker, and has things like screws, nuts, springs, ball detents, that damnable d-shaped spring that holds the front sight/latch in place (Get many of those springs...those little [CENSORED] have a nasty habit of getting lost when you take the marker apart), and a main spring. Personally, I would recommend the 'first aid kit' myself. They usually go for $15 to $20 and are completely worth it.

If nothing else, take the marker to your local pro shop, and tell them you got the thing used, you don't have much experience with 98's, and if they could go through it and check it. Most shops will at least put a tank on it to check for leaks without charging anything. If something is leaking/broken, ask the airsmith if you can watch him work. Sometimes, they'll be cool and let you watch and explain what they are doing. I always used to let first timers watch me work on their marker, when I was a techie. Drove the bosses up a wall (we weren't supposed to tech markers in front of the customers), but it helped the kids learn how to keep their markers in good shape. Again, be aware that any repairs could cost a bit for the shop to perform. (i.e. parts and labor) And most importantly...DO NOT WALK INTO THE SHOP WITH THE HOPPER AND TANK ATTACHED TO THE MARKER!! Tank off, hopper off, and you'll be fine.

As for the tank...don't bother. Co2 tanks are dirt cheap these days, to the point where its cheaper to get a new tank than to get an old one hydro'd. 12 oz tanks cost (depending on your local store) 15-ish bucks. When it comes time to get a tank hydro'd, I would recommend having your local pro shop take care of that. They know who to use, who to avoid, and who does good work when it comes to having a tank certified.

If I could make one suggestion: Go with an HPA tank. Basic HPA tanks are almost as cheap as Co2 tanks, and are better for your marker in a few ways. Co2 does NOT like to be too hot or to cold. Because the Co2 is pumped into the tank in liquid form, its very picky about temperature; either barely working, or making your marker shoot too fast.
HPA is just High Pressure Air...doesn't care if its too hot, to cold, raining, snowing...it just works. HPA also has a gauge on it so you know how much is left in the tank, and when to refill. Co2 tends to just run out without warning. Anyone who used to play with Co2 will tell you that a marker running out of Co2 makes a very loud and distinctive BRRAAAPPPpppp... when you hit the trigger. Then everyone knows your out of Co2...then everyone runs up and shoots you....repeatedly. There's other benefits, but those are the biggies.

The masks...toss 'em. If they're rotting, just get a new mask. One, you get a brand new lens that you know is going to keep your eyes safe, and Two, you can get a mask that fits you and is comfortable to you. This is your eye protection we are talking about...don't take chances.

As for the other stuff...barrel squegeee to clean out busted paintballs...barrel sleeve/sock for off-field safety...a pack to carry some extra paint...lotsa water to keep hydrated (camelbacks are VERY useful)...and the acceptance that the best way to get good at paintball is to get your butt kicked a few times. Good luck!
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Anon1
Anon1

June 17th, 2012, 9:40 pm #3

I think that purchasing an HPA tank would depend on how easy it is to get one filled. I know in my area its still a PITA to get one filled but CO2 is plentiful.
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ABTOMAT
ABTOMAT

June 18th, 2012, 1:26 am #4

The cool thing about 98's is that they're damn near impossible to permanently break. Not that it can't be done, but I doubt that sitting in a closet for 5 years is going to kill one.

First of all, I'd recommend checking the internet for the owners manual. You can go to Tippmann's website (Tippmanusa.com, IIRC) and download a PDF of the manual. Go through it a few times, and it will give you the basic Care and Feeding of the 98. There's newer models available...but for the most part 98's are 98's.

O-ring kits can be found at just about any paintball shop, or ordered from websites. Be aware, there's two separate kits you can order. The first is just the o-rings. Nothing else...just the 'rings. The second is more of a 'first aid kit' for the marker, and has things like screws, nuts, springs, ball detents, that damnable d-shaped spring that holds the front sight/latch in place (Get many of those springs...those little [CENSORED] have a nasty habit of getting lost when you take the marker apart), and a main spring. Personally, I would recommend the 'first aid kit' myself. They usually go for $15 to $20 and are completely worth it.

If nothing else, take the marker to your local pro shop, and tell them you got the thing used, you don't have much experience with 98's, and if they could go through it and check it. Most shops will at least put a tank on it to check for leaks without charging anything. If something is leaking/broken, ask the airsmith if you can watch him work. Sometimes, they'll be cool and let you watch and explain what they are doing. I always used to let first timers watch me work on their marker, when I was a techie. Drove the bosses up a wall (we weren't supposed to tech markers in front of the customers), but it helped the kids learn how to keep their markers in good shape. Again, be aware that any repairs could cost a bit for the shop to perform. (i.e. parts and labor) And most importantly...DO NOT WALK INTO THE SHOP WITH THE HOPPER AND TANK ATTACHED TO THE MARKER!! Tank off, hopper off, and you'll be fine.

As for the tank...don't bother. Co2 tanks are dirt cheap these days, to the point where its cheaper to get a new tank than to get an old one hydro'd. 12 oz tanks cost (depending on your local store) 15-ish bucks. When it comes time to get a tank hydro'd, I would recommend having your local pro shop take care of that. They know who to use, who to avoid, and who does good work when it comes to having a tank certified.

If I could make one suggestion: Go with an HPA tank. Basic HPA tanks are almost as cheap as Co2 tanks, and are better for your marker in a few ways. Co2 does NOT like to be too hot or to cold. Because the Co2 is pumped into the tank in liquid form, its very picky about temperature; either barely working, or making your marker shoot too fast.
HPA is just High Pressure Air...doesn't care if its too hot, to cold, raining, snowing...it just works. HPA also has a gauge on it so you know how much is left in the tank, and when to refill. Co2 tends to just run out without warning. Anyone who used to play with Co2 will tell you that a marker running out of Co2 makes a very loud and distinctive BRRAAAPPPpppp... when you hit the trigger. Then everyone knows your out of Co2...then everyone runs up and shoots you....repeatedly. There's other benefits, but those are the biggies.

The masks...toss 'em. If they're rotting, just get a new mask. One, you get a brand new lens that you know is going to keep your eyes safe, and Two, you can get a mask that fits you and is comfortable to you. This is your eye protection we are talking about...don't take chances.

As for the other stuff...barrel squegeee to clean out busted paintballs...barrel sleeve/sock for off-field safety...a pack to carry some extra paint...lotsa water to keep hydrated (camelbacks are VERY useful)...and the acceptance that the best way to get good at paintball is to get your butt kicked a few times. Good luck!
That's a good start. The hardware's in decent shape so I think O-rings'll do it.

As far as actually working on it, after reading years of TWB horror stories of newbies taking markers apart I was really surprised how simple and crude a thing it is. Much easier to work on than the air guns or machines I'm used to. Apparently that didn't stop the previous owner from getting a ton of crusty pipe sealant into the valve body, though.

I'm going to stick with CO2 for now. HPA is too much of an investment--I'm not actually planning on playing the game--this is just another project to ad to the list for now. But if anyone invites me to go play some time I'll be equipped for it. Might got the HPA route if I get into PCP air rifles.
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Joni
Joni

June 18th, 2012, 8:01 am #5

A 98 is one of the simplest markers to work with imo. The downside of it is that it is rather bulky compared to many other, but that's not much of an issue when playing woodsball. Definately a nice begginner marker.

Most modern markers, even the high end electros are simple nowadays. Try to get an old-school auto-cocker timed, not leaking and optimized for air effenciency and consistency without having the right know-how and you are in for a world of hurt =). It was fun back then though (admittedly I was single and didn't have children), today I don't have the time to fiddle with a marker for 12+ hours to get it juuust right.
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OmniMech
OmniMech

June 18th, 2012, 8:52 am #6

You mean like my '99 autococker that runs like a dream, is easy to maintain, and even the so-called 'tourney' players at the local fields fear? =D
Granted, it takes some time and patience and a few Choice Words to get the sear and 3-way timing just right. Get that 'cocker working just right, though, and even the so-called 'tourney' muppets will think twice about tangling with you.
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Joni
Joni

June 18th, 2012, 9:07 pm #7

Hey, i didn't say they aren't great when correctly set up i love cockers as much as the next guy, but if you don't know what you're doing, you can fudge them up pretty good.
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OmniMech
OmniMech

June 19th, 2012, 12:01 am #8

No arguement, there. I've worked on a few 'cockers for customers while I was working at the local pro shop. (the other 'smiths wouldn't even touch em) And one of my project 'cockers continues to drive me up a wall. The previous owner let the thing sit in a cabinet that must have been over an ancient indian burial ground, if the difficulties I'm dealing with are any indication...
Which reminds me...anyone know where I can get the sear solenoid, with wires and plug, for an Eblade? I've been hunting for those [CENSORED] things online with no luck. I've got a feeling Ill find Hoffa, before I find a fully wired solenoid.
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Anon1
Anon1

June 20th, 2012, 11:09 am #9

www.airsoldier.com ?

I'm terribly out of the loop, but those guys usually had or have a lead on where to get such things.
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