Lathe with a 1/4 hp 115vac motor? What am I missing here?

Lathe with a 1/4 hp 115vac motor? What am I missing here?

Joined: May 11th, 2004, 4:09 am

February 14th, 2018, 12:03 am #1

https://swmi.craigslist.org/tls/d/south ... 57523.html

It looks like that little motor is both driving the chuck and the power feed.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 14th, 2018, 12:22 am #2

The motor drive a jackshaft mounted behind the headstock, and then the jackshaft in turn drives the spindle through the reddish colored leather belt.

Overall, that's not a bad setup, though from what I understand of Lowe 48 prices, it's running about 50% higher than normal.

Two major drawbacks: One, it's a plain bearing headstock, not a roller bearing. (I think, I'm not 100% up to speed on Southbends.) That's not a problem unless the bearings are worn, which is somewhat common. Repairs are not easy.

And two, you have no quickchange gearbox. You can live without it, but it's a serious pain- switching gears to change the feed rate or thread you want cut, can be a 15 minute proposition. (And while I see it comes with the gears, you'll need to de-rust them before you use 'em.)

If you gotta have a lathe, you could sure do worse- SB 9" parts are common, and a few are even being remade these days. There's a 9" QCGB on eBay, though I have no idea if it'd be the correct one to refit to that machine.

It's also $325, and that pushes the whole cost of the machine over $1,800, and really, you could buy a brand-new Grizzly 10" for that.

Doc.
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Joined: May 11th, 2004, 4:09 am

February 14th, 2018, 12:30 am #3

really for what I do 9x20 would be fine, though having a little more space "just in case" wouldn't be bad.

Problem is I don't have 440v available (my shop is residential) nor do I have 3 phase. So a phase converter would be a must for anything non tinker-toy rated, and most of what's on CL near me (Hardinge, etc) in that size are 440/3ph
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Joined: September 12th, 2014, 4:00 am

February 14th, 2018, 2:43 am #4

A lot of 440 volt motors are dual voltage 220/440. Change a few wires and the motor is now 220 volt 3 phase. Then all you need is an appropriately-sized VFD.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 14th, 2018, 6:33 am #5

really for what I do 9x20 would be fine, though having a little more space "just in case" wouldn't be bad.

Problem is I don't have 440v available (my shop is residential) nor do I have 3 phase. So a phase converter would be a must for anything non tinker-toy rated, and most of what's on CL near me (Hardinge, etc) in that size are 440/3ph
Both 3-phase and 440V can be dealt with, and not terribly expensively.

As noted above, some motors (not all) can be simply rewired at the motor (IE, just changing connections) to run on either 220V or 440V. if it can't be rewired to 220V, a transformer can be used- when I went to look at a Hardinge HLV a couple years ago, it had a 440V-only motor, but came with a transformer.

I wired it up temporarily with a VFD and was able to spin it up.

As I said, the Southbend would work for you, but you likely wouldn't be very happy with it. The lack of QCGB is always a pain. if it were me, unless you needed a lathe right away, I'd hold out for a better deal.

Doc.
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Joined: October 24th, 2017, 12:59 am

February 14th, 2018, 2:28 pm #6

really for what I do 9x20 would be fine, though having a little more space "just in case" wouldn't be bad.

Problem is I don't have 440v available (my shop is residential) nor do I have 3 phase. So a phase converter would be a must for anything non tinker-toy rated, and most of what's on CL near me (Hardinge, etc) in that size are 440/3ph
I ran into a similar problem with a G&L surface grinder. It was a nice grinder, complete with hydraulic feed and an electromag chuck, for an unbeatable price.

The problem was, it was 440V/3 phase only.

I ended up buying a 5kw 480-120/240 step down transformer on ebay. Not super expensive ($150, I believe), but I waited for a good deal on something that had been removed from service.

For years, I had a rotary phase converter assembled with a 2hp idler motor, and HVAC capacitors to balance the legs. Then, one day, I happened across a 480V eurotherm VFD on ebay for $35 + $15 shipping, no reserve. I was the first and only bid.

The display screen was a little muckered, but as luck would have it, the screen is an interchangeable module, and it communicates with the rest of the drive via RS232 through a RJ11 jack. Little hackery with the soldering iron later, and I could connect to it with my laptop, using Eurotherm own software for programming.

All that said, the G&E now runs from a standard 120V socket. It's certainly doable, and can be done fairly inexpensively if you're willing to wait for a good deal, and read through some product documentation.

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