Ker-SNAP-POPshh…Hmmm…that can *not* be good.

Ker-SNAP-POPshh…Hmmm…that can *not* be good.

Daniel Meyer
Daniel Meyer

October 25th, 2011, 10:43 pm #1

Blew a line in my bucket truck.

http://theoldvictorian.com/2011/10/25/a ... ng-to-fix/



Ought to be interesting to replace...

CUAgain,
Daniel Meyer
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Renegade_Azzy
Renegade_Azzy

October 25th, 2011, 11:23 pm #2

My recent escapades involving pops have been arched electricity, blown fuses and melted wires.
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Irregular Logic
Irregular Logic

October 26th, 2011, 12:17 am #3

Blew a line in my bucket truck.

http://theoldvictorian.com/2011/10/25/a ... ng-to-fix/



Ought to be interesting to replace...

CUAgain,
Daniel Meyer
Having replaced a few hydraulic hoses myself, I can tell you they are NOT clean jobs! wear really old dirt clothes when you work on this, or at least run them through a separate load in the washer.

first thing I would do is get some hydraulic caps to plug the cyilinder and valveblock, disconnect the hose and pressure wash the crap out of the areas you will be working.

It might be worthwhile to look the boom over for cracks while you are looking at the hydraulics. This kit might be useful for suspect areas http://www.cantesco.com/catalogs/dyepen ... tsheet.pdf)
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Daniel Meyer
Daniel Meyer

October 26th, 2011, 1:11 am #4

I'm sure it will be interesting at the very least!
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Daniel Meyer
Daniel Meyer

October 26th, 2011, 1:12 am #5

My recent escapades involving pops have been arched electricity, blown fuses and melted wires.
I've done a few of those kind of pops myself...
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dsergison
dsergison

October 26th, 2011, 3:15 am #6

Having replaced a few hydraulic hoses myself, I can tell you they are NOT clean jobs! wear really old dirt clothes when you work on this, or at least run them through a separate load in the washer.

first thing I would do is get some hydraulic caps to plug the cyilinder and valveblock, disconnect the hose and pressure wash the crap out of the areas you will be working.

It might be worthwhile to look the boom over for cracks while you are looking at the hydraulics. This kit might be useful for suspect areas http://www.cantesco.com/catalogs/dyepen ... tsheet.pdf)
CAT equipment dealers can make any hose, on site while you wait almost 7 days a week.. with just about any pressure rating and any type of fitting.

not real cheap, no... but they do make them and time is money.

of course it's not a Cat part, and they will have to actually see it to make you a replacement. You may have to be a little insistent that you know what you need and know what your doing. (I'm sure you can handle that)

you'll do well to say you want it in XT3es (3000 psi hose) you probably have JIC fittings.
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Bruce Bergman
Bruce Bergman

October 26th, 2011, 6:01 am #7

Unless the company who built it has gone under, you should be able top get the Maintenance Instructions and Parts Specs and all that - It's a safety thing, they keep lots of very detailed records to Cover Their Posterior.

If this truck is a "work truck" you really should get it's Biennial full safety check done - that'll keep your Insurance Agent from getting a second ulcer.

Call and ask if the company doing the inspections can also change that hose at the same time for a reasonable price, or it's better to find a local Gates Distributor to make the hose and dig into it yourself. Then they can do the inspection after you get it fixed and cleaned up.

Some of those hoses have field installed fittings and you wait till after you get it threaded. Others are crimped on and you can do this in the field if you have the right tools.
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Daniel Meyer
Daniel Meyer

October 26th, 2011, 4:33 pm #8

It's a Versalift, they are still in business (here in Texas too!) so I should be able to get all the info I need.

I'll know more when I pull the hose. I'm in small town Texas so I can get pretty much any hydraulic hose assembly made without any issue. Area stores service logging and farming equipment/etc that make my Fargle-snorker look like a toy.

It's not a commercial rig, so doesn't need the lift equipment inspection, but it still needs to be safe (obviously).

Hose shouldn't be all that expensive, but it will add up as they are LONG. I'll replace any that are suspect.

I'll be sure and post pics/etc when I tear into it.

-dm
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Irregular Logic
Irregular Logic

October 26th, 2011, 9:58 pm #9

CAT equipment dealers can make any hose, on site while you wait almost 7 days a week.. with just about any pressure rating and any type of fitting.

not real cheap, no... but they do make them and time is money.

of course it's not a Cat part, and they will have to actually see it to make you a replacement. You may have to be a little insistent that you know what you need and know what your doing. (I'm sure you can handle that)

you'll do well to say you want it in XT3es (3000 psi hose) you probably have JIC fittings.
There will be hydraulic shops and rubber hose suppliers that will offer hose crimping services. You are not stuck with just dealers.

The guys at NAPA might actually know the names of a few shops. Ask around!
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Bruce Bergman
Bruce Bergman

October 27th, 2011, 4:21 pm #10

It's a Versalift, they are still in business (here in Texas too!) so I should be able to get all the info I need.

I'll know more when I pull the hose. I'm in small town Texas so I can get pretty much any hydraulic hose assembly made without any issue. Area stores service logging and farming equipment/etc that make my Fargle-snorker look like a toy.

It's not a commercial rig, so doesn't need the lift equipment inspection, but it still needs to be safe (obviously).

Hose shouldn't be all that expensive, but it will add up as they are LONG. I'll replace any that are suspect.

I'll be sure and post pics/etc when I tear into it.

-dm
All I'm saying is, AFAIK it's an OSHA thing, and if someone gets hurt and it wasn't current on inspections you can be in a heap of trouble. Even if you're running a one-man show, you have a Contractors License and business licensing and bonding - ergo that makes it Commercial.

Texas DOSH might be more forgiving about that stuff, but OSHA is Federal and follows their normal "We're Here To Help!" {spit} rules - meaning they come out after the incident and start fining everybody for any perceived act or oversight.

I worked at GTE California for a bunch of years, and they have a huge fleet of Bucket Trucks and Pole Boom Trucks, mostly Telsta but there were a smattering of other brands.

And every year or two or three (I drove a van mostly, so I'm not sure what the required intervals are) they had an Authorized Telsta Mechanic out from the factory for a couple weeks, pulling all the trucks in for a partial teardown (enough to see inside) repairs as needed, and full documented safety inspection.

If you don't think it's a problem because it's all personal, that's fine - BUT I'd still suggest a CYA move. Get the 'Official Inspection Forms' and all the factory service manuals and paperwork on how to do the safety inspection and what to look for - and do the inspection yourself at the same time you are getting it apart to fix this problem.

Take tons of pictures to prove it. Pictures of you checking the main turntable bearings for free-play with a feeler gauge, pictures with the fresh grease oozing out of the main turntable bearings. Pictures of the boom all pulled out with a Teleloader forklift so you can check for cracks, of running the penetrant dye and Magnaflux coil you borrowed from the Engine Shop, of painting the inner boom and stuffing it all back together. Etc, Shampoo, Rinse, Repeat.

So if something goes terribly wrong and the lawyers get out the sharp knives and start looking for deep pockets, you have a defense.
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