Joined: November 8th, 2017, 3:33 am

July 10th, 2018, 3:01 pm #11

Can't get much cooler than the milliKelvins the superconductors operate at.  Awesome collection of stainless steel and high tech.

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Joined: September 11th, 2014, 4:35 pm

July 11th, 2018, 11:10 pm #12

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCg3qsV ... aJQ/videos

Japanese YouTuber who, among other things, makes functional knives out of all sorts of materials that one would not normally consider suitable for blades, including chocolate, rice, and cardboard.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 16th, 2018, 2:12 am #13

Speaking of Japanese cool stuff, how about deconstructing a building where virtually none of the activity is visible from the outside. The building simply... grows shorter and shorter each day.

As they say in the video, not as cheap as the typical implosion method, but a lot cleaner, with virtually no noise or anything else to inconvenience nearby buildings or people.

Doc.
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Joined: August 14th, 2017, 10:03 pm

August 16th, 2018, 4:38 am #14

Watched this after the Japanese building demo video.  Top 5 Anchor Drop Failures.  Wow.  Just wow!
 
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 16th, 2018, 8:54 am #15

On almost all of the merchant marine ships I was on (as a contractor, not as in 'stationed on') had a spare anchor. Most had a left and a right anchor, some only had one that could be deployed off of either side. But either way, almost all of them had a spare anchor, bolted to a storage cradle somewhere on the deck.

Many of them even had a spare propeller, although presumably that one wouldn't be replaced at sea.

Doc.
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Joined: July 12th, 2017, 12:19 am

August 16th, 2018, 11:55 am #16

As someone who formerly worked making friction products for large equipment (i.e. trains), most of these can be chalked up to braking system failures. These seem mostly due to poor practices and failure to adhere to proper procedures. Remember that the heat dissipated in a braking system is proportional to the velocity squared. If you let things run away, there's no going back.

Tim
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Joined: November 17th, 2014, 11:09 am

August 16th, 2018, 12:18 pm #17

Yeah, the spare propeller was there only for a shorter stop in the dry dock since it could take weeks to get a new one shipped out, or even months if it needed to be cast first. 
Time is money after all, particularly for cargo haulers.   
My father worked on ships in the 60s, and sailed all over the world. He did carpentry(rebuilt the officer's mess on one ship during a single Europe to America crossing. New floor, new wood panel walls and a lot of other stuff), he had the responsibility for the hatches(this is serious business. The hatches were broad planks that was bolted down individually. If it wasn't tight between them or one was loose they could end up losing the entire hatch during a storm, and a waterfilled cargo bay is really bad news), and securing cargo.   
He even had the 'pleasure' of working aboard one of the old Liberty ships a few times.
(Norway got quite a few of those after the war)
I've told him time and again to please WRITE A BOOK about all his experiences from that time.   
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Joined: October 8th, 2014, 2:05 pm

August 16th, 2018, 1:32 pm #18

Snowtroll wrote: I've told him time and again to please WRITE A BOOK about all his experiences from that time.   
Please keep after him. I'd read that book!
If it ain't broke, I'll fix it!
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Joined: February 2nd, 2015, 4:36 pm

August 16th, 2018, 2:45 pm #19

Do the capstans generally throw smoke or dust in normal operation?

I've never had to mess with an anchor in canoes. 🙂
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Joined: August 14th, 2017, 10:03 pm

August 16th, 2018, 3:43 pm #20

Typeminer wrote: Do the capstans generally throw smoke or dust in normal operation?

I've never had to mess with an anchor in canoes. 🙂
Kept a 3 tonne anchor on mine, you never know when a nor'easter might blow in.

I think most of that 'smoke' is rust.  Probably not the best thing to be standing near if it blows into your eyes.  Looking at these braking systems reminds me of how tiny the rotors seem to be on my 5,500 lb Jeep. When I pulled my wheels to replace the rear pads I was stunned they had about the same surface area as my little Veedub Folf runabout.  Some day when there's money I'd like to upgrade all those rotors.  I can only imagine the heat they experience when I'm descending about 4,000 feet on CA-190 into either Death Valley or the Panamint Valley.  A lot of kinetic energy being converted into heat which must be dissipated. 

Those chains, though, that's really something to watch go by.  Big, heavy and build up some serious momentum.
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