Is oxy/acetylene in a closed garage safe?

Is oxy/acetylene in a closed garage safe?

MarkT
MarkT

June 18th, 2012, 12:20 am #1

I have decided I need an oxy/acetylene setup but am concerned about keeping the tanks in my attached garage. The garage gets pretty hot in summer, but I have never had a problem with my propane tanks that I keep in the garage. So is it safe to keep the tanks in the garage or should I be concerned? I am in Michigan so we don't get over 100 degrees in summer very often but it can happen.
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sniper1rfa
sniper1rfa

June 18th, 2012, 1:01 am #2

keep acetylene inside a closed area of any kind. I would especially not keep it near an oxygen bottle. If you're going to, though, keep them in a well ventilated area.

Acetylene will ignite at almost any fuel/air ratio. When it does, it will explode. It's very easy to ignite.

IIRC acetylene is regulated separately from all other standard gasses, and you're not supposed to keep it within 25 feet of an oxygen bottle.


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IDN
IDN

June 18th, 2012, 3:00 am #3

My brothers acetylene is next to the oxy bottle on the same cart.
So is my old millwright boss's set-up...

They just sit there, have for years.

? bad?
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sniper1rfa
sniper1rfa

June 18th, 2012, 11:49 am #4

I doubt it matters much though. Just don't keep it in a shed.
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Bruce Bergman
Bruce Bergman

June 18th, 2012, 1:40 pm #5

I have decided I need an oxy/acetylene setup but am concerned about keeping the tanks in my attached garage. The garage gets pretty hot in summer, but I have never had a problem with my propane tanks that I keep in the garage. So is it safe to keep the tanks in the garage or should I be concerned? I am in Michigan so we don't get over 100 degrees in summer very often but it can happen.
Go look again, a bit more carefully - you're supposed to have a couple of 6X14 vent grilles down low and up high on your garage walls to allow a little air exchange, both to vent a little car exhaust and especially if there are any gas appliances
(furnace, water heater or clothes dryer) out there. And they usually leak like a sieve around the garage door.

Inside the garage is OK, or go get/build a garden shed with lots of vents added to it, and put it in a naturally shady spot outside for it. You don't want to leave the bottles out in the sun to cook, that's when you get in huge trouble.

Large quantities (like at the Welding Supply) Yes you don't want to keep the Oxygen and Acetylene stored together. One set of bottles in active use is a different matter.

Protect the bottles from physical damage, keep them restrained upright in their cart or a storage crate, and NOT at the end of the garage where a car overrunning it's space can bumper-crunch them into the wall.
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Chase
Chase

June 18th, 2012, 3:21 pm #6

I have decided I need an oxy/acetylene setup but am concerned about keeping the tanks in my attached garage. The garage gets pretty hot in summer, but I have never had a problem with my propane tanks that I keep in the garage. So is it safe to keep the tanks in the garage or should I be concerned? I am in Michigan so we don't get over 100 degrees in summer very often but it can happen.
About 10 years ago or so, two employees working on a building addition at Southeastern Louisiana University showed up for work and entered a job trailer where an oxy-acetylene cart was stored. One of them flipped a light switch. I heard the explosion probably 5 miles away.

It was later determined that some valves had been left cracked the Friday afternoon before, and gas build-up occurred all weekend long until someone produced a spark.

Be careful of your gasses accumulating. Have a good venting procedure. Store the cart outside if you can.
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ta2maki
ta2maki

June 18th, 2012, 5:22 pm #7

I doubt it matters much though. Just don't keep it in a shed.
Every oxy-acetylene setup I've seen has the 2 tanks chained next to each other on the same cart.
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MarkT
MarkT

June 18th, 2012, 8:10 pm #8

Go look again, a bit more carefully - you're supposed to have a couple of 6X14 vent grilles down low and up high on your garage walls to allow a little air exchange, both to vent a little car exhaust and especially if there are any gas appliances
(furnace, water heater or clothes dryer) out there. And they usually leak like a sieve around the garage door.

Inside the garage is OK, or go get/build a garden shed with lots of vents added to it, and put it in a naturally shady spot outside for it. You don't want to leave the bottles out in the sun to cook, that's when you get in huge trouble.

Large quantities (like at the Welding Supply) Yes you don't want to keep the Oxygen and Acetylene stored together. One set of bottles in active use is a different matter.

Protect the bottles from physical damage, keep them restrained upright in their cart or a storage crate, and NOT at the end of the garage where a car overrunning it's space can bumper-crunch them into the wall.
My garage is only 15 years old but doesn't have air vents inside. The roof has vents but the garage has a drywall ceiling and no venting.

My biggest question is with the heat but it sounds like that should be okay.
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B
B

June 18th, 2012, 10:37 pm #9

I have decided I need an oxy/acetylene setup but am concerned about keeping the tanks in my attached garage. The garage gets pretty hot in summer, but I have never had a problem with my propane tanks that I keep in the garage. So is it safe to keep the tanks in the garage or should I be concerned? I am in Michigan so we don't get over 100 degrees in summer very often but it can happen.
most only allow for 20lb bottles, and a combination of no more than 100lbs in total
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GladMech
GladMech

June 18th, 2012, 10:58 pm #10

About 10 years ago or so, two employees working on a building addition at Southeastern Louisiana University showed up for work and entered a job trailer where an oxy-acetylene cart was stored. One of them flipped a light switch. I heard the explosion probably 5 miles away.

It was later determined that some valves had been left cracked the Friday afternoon before, and gas build-up occurred all weekend long until someone produced a spark.

Be careful of your gasses accumulating. Have a good venting procedure. Store the cart outside if you can.
new tanks
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