Idea: How to Legally Pay Jinx?

Idea: How to Legally Pay Jinx?

Joined: October 21st, 2016, 11:45 pm

August 30th, 2017, 1:43 am #1

Jinx is technically not old enough to be paid for work. However, there is something called an allowance.

Why can't Doc just set up a deal where he's paying Jinx's father the money that Jinx earns by helping out at the shop, and Jinx's father then pays Jinx this money in installments equal to a paycheck for whatever the rate he gets his allowance (weekly, monthly, etc.)? That way, it's technically allowance money right?

However, I do know woefully little about economics and economic law, so I could be wrong. Any objections?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 11th, 2016, 8:57 pm

August 30th, 2017, 2:01 am #2

Dunno about Doc's universe, but in a lot of countries, you don't pay tax etc until you reach a certain income. In Oz, it's a bit over $20k PA. Otherwise, kids would have to pay tax on their paper round money, (less expenses - wear and tear on the sweatwheel, etc) so provided Jinx is a casual, low hours 'employee', he'd be covered by Doc's (and Red's) workers' insurance, and the Guvmint wouldn't worry about taxing his income.
Breakfast.com halted. Cereal port not ready.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 30th, 2017, 2:10 am #3

Jinx is technically not old enough to be paid for work. However, there is something called an allowance.

Why can't Doc just set up a deal where he's paying Jinx's father the money that Jinx earns by helping out at the shop, and Jinx's father then pays Jinx this money in installments equal to a paycheck for whatever the rate he gets his allowance (weekly, monthly, etc.)? That way, it's technically allowance money right?

However, I do know woefully little about economics and economic law, so I could be wrong. Any objections?
Actually, there's no reason Doc can't pay him normally. Keep in mind Macaulay Culkin was what, ten when he did Home Alone? Acting is very much a job, but being a minor, there was a limit to how long he could work in a day, one or the other parent had to be present at all times, and the money went to the parents (who wound up spending it all, but that's an aside. )

However, as a minor, there are of course restrictions- his parents would likely need to sign any official paperwork, plus likely something saying they agree to let him work, etc.

And there's a limit to how long a child/minor can work in a day- I'm not sure, and it might vary by area, but I think it's like four hours per day, and might be a limited number of days per week or pay period.

And there'd be some loopholes to sort out with things like insurance (IE, would Doc's insurance cover a minor) and possibly even things like OSHA (considering there's any number of dangerous items and activities going on down there.)

I've never tried to hire anyone, especially not a kid, so I'm kind of guessing there. But really, if Doc (and/or Sandy) were willing to run the right kind of paperwork, there's no reason I can think of that Jinx couldn't work at least a few hours a day at the shop.

The "Can you be 18 on a tax form?" thing was basically a way of saying "we could save a lot of paperwork hassles if you could suddenly be 18 on some forms."

Doc.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 16th, 2016, 11:47 am

August 30th, 2017, 3:16 am #4

Jinx is technically not old enough to be paid for work. However, there is something called an allowance.

Why can't Doc just set up a deal where he's paying Jinx's father the money that Jinx earns by helping out at the shop, and Jinx's father then pays Jinx this money in installments equal to a paycheck for whatever the rate he gets his allowance (weekly, monthly, etc.)? That way, it's technically allowance money right?

However, I do know woefully little about economics and economic law, so I could be wrong. Any objections?
I had to be sixteen to sign a contract as a cooperative observer for NOAA.
Before that I was doing the observation but dad had signed the contract. I also was paid under the table to sort returnable soda bottles at the store next to school.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 27th, 2014, 12:30 pm

August 30th, 2017, 4:04 am #5

Actually, there's no reason Doc can't pay him normally. Keep in mind Macaulay Culkin was what, ten when he did Home Alone? Acting is very much a job, but being a minor, there was a limit to how long he could work in a day, one or the other parent had to be present at all times, and the money went to the parents (who wound up spending it all, but that's an aside. )

However, as a minor, there are of course restrictions- his parents would likely need to sign any official paperwork, plus likely something saying they agree to let him work, etc.

And there's a limit to how long a child/minor can work in a day- I'm not sure, and it might vary by area, but I think it's like four hours per day, and might be a limited number of days per week or pay period.

And there'd be some loopholes to sort out with things like insurance (IE, would Doc's insurance cover a minor) and possibly even things like OSHA (considering there's any number of dangerous items and activities going on down there.)

I've never tried to hire anyone, especially not a kid, so I'm kind of guessing there. But really, if Doc (and/or Sandy) were willing to run the right kind of paperwork, there's no reason I can think of that Jinx couldn't work at least a few hours a day at the shop.

The "Can you be 18 on a tax form?" thing was basically a way of saying "we could save a lot of paperwork hassles if you could suddenly be 18 on some forms."

Doc.
By federal law you have to be 14 or over to have a non farm or hazards work place job. States can have that as older, like in California the last that I knew you had to be at lest 16 for a non farming job.

Show business has its own child labor laws that has nothing to do with any other industry.

Having your own children working for your own company there are no restrictions as long as its not defined as hazards work. It has been known in the past when child labor laws where first passed that people would adopt children so as to have a free labor force. Such adoptions had been stopped decades ago.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 11th, 2014, 5:40 pm

August 30th, 2017, 10:15 am #6

Jinx is technically not old enough to be paid for work. However, there is something called an allowance.

Why can't Doc just set up a deal where he's paying Jinx's father the money that Jinx earns by helping out at the shop, and Jinx's father then pays Jinx this money in installments equal to a paycheck for whatever the rate he gets his allowance (weekly, monthly, etc.)? That way, it's technically allowance money right?

However, I do know woefully little about economics and economic law, so I could be wrong. Any objections?
"he doesnt work here i just gave him his birthday present early" kinda thing
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 12th, 2014, 3:32 am

August 30th, 2017, 3:59 pm #7

By federal law you have to be 14 or over to have a non farm or hazards work place job. States can have that as older, like in California the last that I knew you had to be at lest 16 for a non farming job.

Show business has its own child labor laws that has nothing to do with any other industry.

Having your own children working for your own company there are no restrictions as long as its not defined as hazards work. It has been known in the past when child labor laws where first passed that people would adopt children so as to have a free labor force. Such adoptions had been stopped decades ago.
Back when dinosaurs ruled the earth and I was in my early teens, I did a summer job working through a program sponsored by the government (City, I think- it's been a while!) and was a dishwasher at the local hospital. It was an interesting job feeding dishes to a giant washing machine the size of a school bus that cleaned and sanitized the dishes automatically.

Worked great for almost a month until I managed to slip on a patch of damp floor, got sent upstairs to the ER, and the program found out that having a minor near that machine was an OSHA violation that could have gotten the program and the hospital in a lot of hot water (pun intended).

Workman's comp covered the $125 aspirin and ER visit bill, and I was out of a job. It was a case of 'we don't care that you know that it's a big moving machine and that if you are stupid enough to climb into it while it's running you'll maim yourself, we can't let you near it period' coddling. I didn't understand it at the time, but looking back I can see why they were overbearing.

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 12th, 2014, 3:32 am

August 30th, 2017, 4:22 pm #8

"he doesnt work here i just gave him his birthday present early" kinda thing
I did a side job 'under the table' a couple years ago and requested payment in hardware. the company I was doing the work for was kinda weird about it, but they paid up.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 15th, 2015, 1:31 pm

August 30th, 2017, 7:44 pm #9

Back when dinosaurs ruled the earth and I was in my early teens, I did a summer job working through a program sponsored by the government (City, I think- it's been a while!) and was a dishwasher at the local hospital. It was an interesting job feeding dishes to a giant washing machine the size of a school bus that cleaned and sanitized the dishes automatically.

Worked great for almost a month until I managed to slip on a patch of damp floor, got sent upstairs to the ER, and the program found out that having a minor near that machine was an OSHA violation that could have gotten the program and the hospital in a lot of hot water (pun intended).

Workman's comp covered the $125 aspirin and ER visit bill, and I was out of a job. It was a case of 'we don't care that you know that it's a big moving machine and that if you are stupid enough to climb into it while it's running you'll maim yourself, we can't let you near it period' coddling. I didn't understand it at the time, but looking back I can see why they were overbearing.
and this is the reason that there is a overwhelming lack of situational awareness and common sense these days. stupidity should hurt. remove all the safety gaurds and let nature sort it out.
2003 BIOHAZARD ELECTRO COCKER
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 21st, 2016, 11:45 pm

August 30th, 2017, 11:22 pm #10

Actually, there's no reason Doc can't pay him normally. Keep in mind Macaulay Culkin was what, ten when he did Home Alone? Acting is very much a job, but being a minor, there was a limit to how long he could work in a day, one or the other parent had to be present at all times, and the money went to the parents (who wound up spending it all, but that's an aside. )

However, as a minor, there are of course restrictions- his parents would likely need to sign any official paperwork, plus likely something saying they agree to let him work, etc.

And there's a limit to how long a child/minor can work in a day- I'm not sure, and it might vary by area, but I think it's like four hours per day, and might be a limited number of days per week or pay period.

And there'd be some loopholes to sort out with things like insurance (IE, would Doc's insurance cover a minor) and possibly even things like OSHA (considering there's any number of dangerous items and activities going on down there.)

I've never tried to hire anyone, especially not a kid, so I'm kind of guessing there. But really, if Doc (and/or Sandy) were willing to run the right kind of paperwork, there's no reason I can think of that Jinx couldn't work at least a few hours a day at the shop.

The "Can you be 18 on a tax form?" thing was basically a way of saying "we could save a lot of paperwork hassles if you could suddenly be 18 on some forms."

Doc.
...why doesn't Doc pay him? Yes, it's a lot of paperwork hassle, but that store would be in trouble without Jinx hanging around and helping out so much.
Quote
Like
Share