I can't BELIEVE this!

I can't BELIEVE this!

Urban Werebear
Urban Werebear

April 30th, 2012, 5:31 am #1

So there I was, four whole weeks ago, picking up a car I had just bought. 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix GT.

Two weeks later, I was riding the bus again. The car wouldn't start, wouldn't even turn over. The dealer gave me a new battery and it still wouldn't turn over. Finally got it running, got it back to the dealer, and he had a new starter put in. This was last Tuesday.

Today, I was at a restaurant picking up dinner. Tried to start the car and it wouldn't catch. Tried again and it sorta caught, then died. Once more, and some coaxing with the gas pedal, and it caught, spitting out a huge cloud of white smoke. Idiot lights started flashing "low coolant" and "service engine soon". I managed to get home and it died halfway up the driveway. Tried to start it and it went "grunnnk" and refused to crank.

So, I'm guessing either the block cracked or the head gasket went. It was too dark to check anything by the time I got home, so I'll be doing the post-mortem in the morning, and calling the dealer, the finance company, and possibly a lawyer. No matter what, I'm figuring I might as well buy a bus pass and get used to walking home five miles at the end of a ten-hour shift (no public transit after 10pm here).

Sorry to dump all this here, but I really needed to vent to someone outside my household, and it was too late to call anyone I know personally.
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Ketira
Ketira

April 30th, 2012, 7:43 am #2

....and don't forget to get out the bill of sale as well; said lawyer will want to go over that to look for any loopholes on the dealer's part. On one of your breaks, look up your state's Lemon Law to give you a heads up on what your rights are about such things.

As for walking the five miles home: When does bus service start? Tell your boss about the predicament as well and ask him to get off early so you don't have to hike home in the dark. Thugs, thieves & other nasty folk will be looking for someone like you, and it's better to be safe than sorry.
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Eric
Eric

April 30th, 2012, 10:05 am #3

I know that some states/countries have lemon laws for just this type of situation. Normaly they have a expiration date (aka if you had the car for more than 60 days you cant use the lemon law anymore). Biggest thing to bring up is that you did NOTHING to the car after getting it from the dealer. I know from experience that if you even say that you topped off the radiator coolant the dealer can throw a wrench in by saying that you damaged the car.
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sniper1rfa
sniper1rfa

April 30th, 2012, 11:30 am #4

do not apply to ten year old cars.
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Brandon_ha
Brandon_ha

April 30th, 2012, 12:53 pm #5

So there I was, four whole weeks ago, picking up a car I had just bought. 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix GT.

Two weeks later, I was riding the bus again. The car wouldn't start, wouldn't even turn over. The dealer gave me a new battery and it still wouldn't turn over. Finally got it running, got it back to the dealer, and he had a new starter put in. This was last Tuesday.

Today, I was at a restaurant picking up dinner. Tried to start the car and it wouldn't catch. Tried again and it sorta caught, then died. Once more, and some coaxing with the gas pedal, and it caught, spitting out a huge cloud of white smoke. Idiot lights started flashing "low coolant" and "service engine soon". I managed to get home and it died halfway up the driveway. Tried to start it and it went "grunnnk" and refused to crank.

So, I'm guessing either the block cracked or the head gasket went. It was too dark to check anything by the time I got home, so I'll be doing the post-mortem in the morning, and calling the dealer, the finance company, and possibly a lawyer. No matter what, I'm figuring I might as well buy a bus pass and get used to walking home five miles at the end of a ten-hour shift (no public transit after 10pm here).

Sorry to dump all this here, but I really needed to vent to someone outside my household, and it was too late to call anyone I know personally.
You might have something similar on a state basis.
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Renegade_Azzy
Renegade_Azzy

April 30th, 2012, 1:19 pm #6

So there I was, four whole weeks ago, picking up a car I had just bought. 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix GT.

Two weeks later, I was riding the bus again. The car wouldn't start, wouldn't even turn over. The dealer gave me a new battery and it still wouldn't turn over. Finally got it running, got it back to the dealer, and he had a new starter put in. This was last Tuesday.

Today, I was at a restaurant picking up dinner. Tried to start the car and it wouldn't catch. Tried again and it sorta caught, then died. Once more, and some coaxing with the gas pedal, and it caught, spitting out a huge cloud of white smoke. Idiot lights started flashing "low coolant" and "service engine soon". I managed to get home and it died halfway up the driveway. Tried to start it and it went "grunnnk" and refused to crank.

So, I'm guessing either the block cracked or the head gasket went. It was too dark to check anything by the time I got home, so I'll be doing the post-mortem in the morning, and calling the dealer, the finance company, and possibly a lawyer. No matter what, I'm figuring I might as well buy a bus pass and get used to walking home five miles at the end of a ten-hour shift (no public transit after 10pm here).

Sorry to dump all this here, but I really needed to vent to someone outside my household, and it was too late to call anyone I know personally.
At that point, its time to call AAA. And you can sign up when you need them, for the extended service, for cheaper than a tow. Driving it like that likely scorched the bearings and cam, and now that block is toast.
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Urban Werebear
Urban Werebear

April 30th, 2012, 1:20 pm #7

....and don't forget to get out the bill of sale as well; said lawyer will want to go over that to look for any loopholes on the dealer's part. On one of your breaks, look up your state's Lemon Law to give you a heads up on what your rights are about such things.

As for walking the five miles home: When does bus service start? Tell your boss about the predicament as well and ask him to get off early so you don't have to hike home in the dark. Thugs, thieves & other nasty folk will be looking for someone like you, and it's better to be safe than sorry.
I actually looked up the Lemon Law when the battery failed to fix the initial problem. There are no protections for used car buyers outside of the court of public opinion, unless the car is specifically sold with a warranty.

Walking the five miles home will be a necessity, I'm afraid, as I get done around 3am and the first bus out of the terminal is 5:45 (last bus leaves at 9:45). Getting done early isn't an option, as I drive a dedicated cargo route and am about 100 miles from the office at the time I'd have to catch the bus.

Thugs and thieves, at least, I don't need to worry about, due to trekking through a mostly semi-rural area and the fact that they're usually not prowling that late.
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Urban Werebear
Urban Werebear

April 30th, 2012, 1:32 pm #8

At that point, its time to call AAA. And you can sign up when you need them, for the extended service, for cheaper than a tow. Driving it like that likely scorched the bearings and cam, and now that block is toast.
I pretty much had no choice. I can't afford AAA right now, couldn't leave the car there, and definitely can't afford a tow.

My only hope now is that it's not as bad as I thought, though it's not a very big hope.
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Urban Werebear
Urban Werebear

April 30th, 2012, 1:37 pm #9

do not apply to ten year old cars.
Lemon laws in my state don't apply to any used car sold without a warranty. The dealer was extraordinarily accommodating already with the starter. I suspect at this point he may say, "Sorry, you're on your own."
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Renegade_Azzy
Renegade_Azzy

April 30th, 2012, 6:53 pm #10

I pretty much had no choice. I can't afford AAA right now, couldn't leave the car there, and definitely can't afford a tow.

My only hope now is that it's not as bad as I thought, though it's not a very big hope.
....in cases like these, turns into couldn't afford to have the block machined, head replaced, +pistons and rings and a junkyard crankshaft.

We've all done stuff like this, but I'm guessing there is a lot of damage that could have been prevented by an immediate shutdown. Not ragging on you, just hoping the next guy sees this and can learn from the event.
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