I am clearly insane.

I am clearly insane.

Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

November 2nd, 2007, 10:55 am #1

One of the small projects I was working on today, was an older Spyder that a local customer had gotten cheap/free because the previous owner attempted to do a "trigger job" to it- apparently with a bench grinder.

Now, this is actually a pretty easy fix. Here's a trick; music wire works great as a sort of hardfacing rod. It's fairly high-carbon, and because a small button-weld/tack-weld cools very quickly (even on a small part like a sear) it pretty much self-quenches, leaving a fairly hard surface.

I usually dunk it in water immediately after welding, to help it along. It's almost impossible to get it so hard it's brittle, but with a bit of luck, you can get a fresh surface that's too hard to file.

After that, just shape and dress with a grinder/Dremel and some stones, and you're back in business. Assuming you already have a TIG in the shop, it's way faster than trying to order a replacement sear, or find a "parts" gun to strip.

Anyway, as I was doing this one today, I reflected that it'd be nice if I could do the same thing to my anvil.

My anvil is a very good-quality Peter Wright that's very likely a little over a century old. (Roughly 1885 to no later than 1910.) The face is so hard it flattens a centerpunch that can put a dent in a new Nicholson file. I'm guessing somewhere around Rockwell 70C, but that's no more than a guess.

However, as good as it is, it's been used hard for much of that intervening century, and is now badly chipped, slightly swaybacked, worn down, rounded over and blunted. There is nothing even close to a sharp corner anywhere on the working face. The best spot still has no less than a 1/4" radius.

I've heavily researched methods of fixing it, mainly looking at hardfacing rods for stick welders. I went so far as to buy over $100 in rods, only to find out they didn't work for beans.

Doing another one of these sears got me thinking; hardfacing TIG rod, while much slower, might work where the stick rod failed. If I worked on a very small area at a time, and made very small and short beads, I suspected that I might just be able to build up the corners- and just the corners- with some steel that, while not as hard as the main face, would at least be much harder than plain MIG wire, and probably somewhat harder than even good hardfacing rod.

So as an experiment, I tried it, working from one of the back corners. Here's what I started with:



I ground out most of the rust...



And tried a little bit with some 1/16" music wire. It worked, albeit being slow. I kept a wet rag on hand to "quench" the welds even further- or at least to keep any residual heat from drawing a temper out- and I ended up with beads that were for the most part too hard to file.

Hardness varied a bit, though, as there were definitely spots soft enough to file, but even this would be acceptable, if no other options were available, simply to get a usable square corner or two.

But that made me think- what if I had an even higher-carbon-content filler rod? Something that'd land file-hard if you so much as looked at it funny. So I started thinking, what do I have that would be a very-high-carbon steel, but close enough to "filler rod" size that I could actually weld with it?

After pondering that one for a few more hours, it finally hit me:



Needle bearings! These are the "loose" needles out of an old truck universal joint spider, a little over 1/16" in diameter and roughly 3/8" long. I know bearing steels have a lot more in them than just carbon, but I also know they come very, very hard.

So after making a reservation for a nice, padded room over the weekend, I sat down to try and weld a 140-pound anvil with filler rods three-eighths of an inch long.

It was actually pretty easy, just time-consuming. I'd take a moment to tack up six or seven short rods, each with a bearing on both ends:



... Which was a simple tap-and-tack with the TIG.

I'd make a bead of about one bearing long, and immediately quench it with a wet rag. I stopped frequently to let the anvil cool- it never got "hot", but I wanted it as cool as possible for maximum quench on the welds.

I was just experimenting, so I was only doing a small section. It still took a while, but eventually I had a decent build-up:



And, with a little grinding and sanding, I have a corner again:



It's not perfect. There's definitely a few softish spots, but the bulk of it is too hard to file. The "seam" between the weld and the rest of the face is shallow, and only there because the top face is "domed" slightly. I don't (yet) want to grind it down to meet flush, in order to preserve as much original face as possible.

It's also horrifically slow, and very costly in shield gas.

But, all that said, if I do it a little at a time, and take my time, I think I can restore most of the corners to a useful state, as well as repair other damage like that spalled crater seen in the pics, aft of the hardy hole. (The hardy will probably also get it's corners built back up, as well as filling in that chip in the pritchel hole.)

Of course, while I had the big heavy lump up on the welding table, I figured I'd take care of at least one other thing that's been bugging me. The nose, or horn, has lost at least half an inch, and was thus badly blunted:



This ones' easy, though. The horn, like the bulk of the main body, is mostly pure wrought iron, which meant I needed nothing more sophisticated than a good MIG to patch it.

First, clean off the rust:



Then just squirt some hot steel on...



The just grind to shape and sand smooth.



Took perhaps ten minutes, all told. Easy and quick, and not only restores some needed functionality (like for these) but also makes it look better. More complete. Not a big thing, but hey, I'm the guy that polished and gun-blued his hammer, okay?

Doc.
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CRySyS
CRySyS

November 2nd, 2007, 11:32 am #2

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A.D.D.:_Th ... r_Disorder

LOL.

BTW: If you can find Clone High episodes anywhere, I highly recommend it. Freaking hilarious.
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Nobody
Nobody

November 2nd, 2007, 1:55 pm #3

One of the small projects I was working on today, was an older Spyder that a local customer had gotten cheap/free because the previous owner attempted to do a "trigger job" to it- apparently with a bench grinder.

Now, this is actually a pretty easy fix. Here's a trick; music wire works great as a sort of hardfacing rod. It's fairly high-carbon, and because a small button-weld/tack-weld cools very quickly (even on a small part like a sear) it pretty much self-quenches, leaving a fairly hard surface.

I usually dunk it in water immediately after welding, to help it along. It's almost impossible to get it so hard it's brittle, but with a bit of luck, you can get a fresh surface that's too hard to file.

After that, just shape and dress with a grinder/Dremel and some stones, and you're back in business. Assuming you already have a TIG in the shop, it's way faster than trying to order a replacement sear, or find a "parts" gun to strip.

Anyway, as I was doing this one today, I reflected that it'd be nice if I could do the same thing to my anvil.

My anvil is a very good-quality Peter Wright that's very likely a little over a century old. (Roughly 1885 to no later than 1910.) The face is so hard it flattens a centerpunch that can put a dent in a new Nicholson file. I'm guessing somewhere around Rockwell 70C, but that's no more than a guess.

However, as good as it is, it's been used hard for much of that intervening century, and is now badly chipped, slightly swaybacked, worn down, rounded over and blunted. There is nothing even close to a sharp corner anywhere on the working face. The best spot still has no less than a 1/4" radius.

I've heavily researched methods of fixing it, mainly looking at hardfacing rods for stick welders. I went so far as to buy over $100 in rods, only to find out they didn't work for beans.

Doing another one of these sears got me thinking; hardfacing TIG rod, while much slower, might work where the stick rod failed. If I worked on a very small area at a time, and made very small and short beads, I suspected that I might just be able to build up the corners- and just the corners- with some steel that, while not as hard as the main face, would at least be much harder than plain MIG wire, and probably somewhat harder than even good hardfacing rod.

So as an experiment, I tried it, working from one of the back corners. Here's what I started with:



I ground out most of the rust...



And tried a little bit with some 1/16" music wire. It worked, albeit being slow. I kept a wet rag on hand to "quench" the welds even further- or at least to keep any residual heat from drawing a temper out- and I ended up with beads that were for the most part too hard to file.

Hardness varied a bit, though, as there were definitely spots soft enough to file, but even this would be acceptable, if no other options were available, simply to get a usable square corner or two.

But that made me think- what if I had an even higher-carbon-content filler rod? Something that'd land file-hard if you so much as looked at it funny. So I started thinking, what do I have that would be a very-high-carbon steel, but close enough to "filler rod" size that I could actually weld with it?

After pondering that one for a few more hours, it finally hit me:



Needle bearings! These are the "loose" needles out of an old truck universal joint spider, a little over 1/16" in diameter and roughly 3/8" long. I know bearing steels have a lot more in them than just carbon, but I also know they come very, very hard.

So after making a reservation for a nice, padded room over the weekend, I sat down to try and weld a 140-pound anvil with filler rods three-eighths of an inch long.

It was actually pretty easy, just time-consuming. I'd take a moment to tack up six or seven short rods, each with a bearing on both ends:



... Which was a simple tap-and-tack with the TIG.

I'd make a bead of about one bearing long, and immediately quench it with a wet rag. I stopped frequently to let the anvil cool- it never got "hot", but I wanted it as cool as possible for maximum quench on the welds.

I was just experimenting, so I was only doing a small section. It still took a while, but eventually I had a decent build-up:



And, with a little grinding and sanding, I have a corner again:



It's not perfect. There's definitely a few softish spots, but the bulk of it is too hard to file. The "seam" between the weld and the rest of the face is shallow, and only there because the top face is "domed" slightly. I don't (yet) want to grind it down to meet flush, in order to preserve as much original face as possible.

It's also horrifically slow, and very costly in shield gas.

But, all that said, if I do it a little at a time, and take my time, I think I can restore most of the corners to a useful state, as well as repair other damage like that spalled crater seen in the pics, aft of the hardy hole. (The hardy will probably also get it's corners built back up, as well as filling in that chip in the pritchel hole.)

Of course, while I had the big heavy lump up on the welding table, I figured I'd take care of at least one other thing that's been bugging me. The nose, or horn, has lost at least half an inch, and was thus badly blunted:



This ones' easy, though. The horn, like the bulk of the main body, is mostly pure wrought iron, which meant I needed nothing more sophisticated than a good MIG to patch it.

First, clean off the rust:



Then just squirt some hot steel on...



The just grind to shape and sand smooth.



Took perhaps ten minutes, all told. Easy and quick, and not only restores some needed functionality (like for these) but also makes it look better. More complete. Not a big thing, but hey, I'm the guy that polished and gun-blued his hammer, okay?

Doc.
the needle bearings from the U-joint, did you have them on hand, i.e. you literally saved them for something or did you just have a spare U-joint on hand and "robbed Peter to pay Paul"? most sane people don't save needle bearings. mostly if they are out of the joint, they came from a replacement job and the trunion cap fell and scattered the little guys all over the shop, but that's just me.

Nobody

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Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

November 2nd, 2007, 2:23 pm #4

... But I'd saved the whole U-joint spider. It'd been used, but was still in pretty good shape, but was unlabeled and in a box of random parts, so I don't know what it fits.

I was actually looking, however, for a box of similar needles that are roughly twice as long, that came out of a Toronado front-drive halfshaft. I know I saved a boxful of those somewhere, and I seem to recall they were nearly an inch long.

I have no idea where they are though, but I found the (probably Chevy truck) joint while looking.

It's things like this that are the reason I'm a packrat.

Doc.
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Lurius Vulpius
Lurius Vulpius

November 2nd, 2007, 4:22 pm #5

One of the small projects I was working on today, was an older Spyder that a local customer had gotten cheap/free because the previous owner attempted to do a "trigger job" to it- apparently with a bench grinder.

Now, this is actually a pretty easy fix. Here's a trick; music wire works great as a sort of hardfacing rod. It's fairly high-carbon, and because a small button-weld/tack-weld cools very quickly (even on a small part like a sear) it pretty much self-quenches, leaving a fairly hard surface.

I usually dunk it in water immediately after welding, to help it along. It's almost impossible to get it so hard it's brittle, but with a bit of luck, you can get a fresh surface that's too hard to file.

After that, just shape and dress with a grinder/Dremel and some stones, and you're back in business. Assuming you already have a TIG in the shop, it's way faster than trying to order a replacement sear, or find a "parts" gun to strip.

Anyway, as I was doing this one today, I reflected that it'd be nice if I could do the same thing to my anvil.

My anvil is a very good-quality Peter Wright that's very likely a little over a century old. (Roughly 1885 to no later than 1910.) The face is so hard it flattens a centerpunch that can put a dent in a new Nicholson file. I'm guessing somewhere around Rockwell 70C, but that's no more than a guess.

However, as good as it is, it's been used hard for much of that intervening century, and is now badly chipped, slightly swaybacked, worn down, rounded over and blunted. There is nothing even close to a sharp corner anywhere on the working face. The best spot still has no less than a 1/4" radius.

I've heavily researched methods of fixing it, mainly looking at hardfacing rods for stick welders. I went so far as to buy over $100 in rods, only to find out they didn't work for beans.

Doing another one of these sears got me thinking; hardfacing TIG rod, while much slower, might work where the stick rod failed. If I worked on a very small area at a time, and made very small and short beads, I suspected that I might just be able to build up the corners- and just the corners- with some steel that, while not as hard as the main face, would at least be much harder than plain MIG wire, and probably somewhat harder than even good hardfacing rod.

So as an experiment, I tried it, working from one of the back corners. Here's what I started with:



I ground out most of the rust...



And tried a little bit with some 1/16" music wire. It worked, albeit being slow. I kept a wet rag on hand to "quench" the welds even further- or at least to keep any residual heat from drawing a temper out- and I ended up with beads that were for the most part too hard to file.

Hardness varied a bit, though, as there were definitely spots soft enough to file, but even this would be acceptable, if no other options were available, simply to get a usable square corner or two.

But that made me think- what if I had an even higher-carbon-content filler rod? Something that'd land file-hard if you so much as looked at it funny. So I started thinking, what do I have that would be a very-high-carbon steel, but close enough to "filler rod" size that I could actually weld with it?

After pondering that one for a few more hours, it finally hit me:



Needle bearings! These are the "loose" needles out of an old truck universal joint spider, a little over 1/16" in diameter and roughly 3/8" long. I know bearing steels have a lot more in them than just carbon, but I also know they come very, very hard.

So after making a reservation for a nice, padded room over the weekend, I sat down to try and weld a 140-pound anvil with filler rods three-eighths of an inch long.

It was actually pretty easy, just time-consuming. I'd take a moment to tack up six or seven short rods, each with a bearing on both ends:



... Which was a simple tap-and-tack with the TIG.

I'd make a bead of about one bearing long, and immediately quench it with a wet rag. I stopped frequently to let the anvil cool- it never got "hot", but I wanted it as cool as possible for maximum quench on the welds.

I was just experimenting, so I was only doing a small section. It still took a while, but eventually I had a decent build-up:



And, with a little grinding and sanding, I have a corner again:



It's not perfect. There's definitely a few softish spots, but the bulk of it is too hard to file. The "seam" between the weld and the rest of the face is shallow, and only there because the top face is "domed" slightly. I don't (yet) want to grind it down to meet flush, in order to preserve as much original face as possible.

It's also horrifically slow, and very costly in shield gas.

But, all that said, if I do it a little at a time, and take my time, I think I can restore most of the corners to a useful state, as well as repair other damage like that spalled crater seen in the pics, aft of the hardy hole. (The hardy will probably also get it's corners built back up, as well as filling in that chip in the pritchel hole.)

Of course, while I had the big heavy lump up on the welding table, I figured I'd take care of at least one other thing that's been bugging me. The nose, or horn, has lost at least half an inch, and was thus badly blunted:



This ones' easy, though. The horn, like the bulk of the main body, is mostly pure wrought iron, which meant I needed nothing more sophisticated than a good MIG to patch it.

First, clean off the rust:



Then just squirt some hot steel on...



The just grind to shape and sand smooth.



Took perhaps ten minutes, all told. Easy and quick, and not only restores some needed functionality (like for these) but also makes it look better. More complete. Not a big thing, but hey, I'm the guy that polished and gun-blued his hammer, okay?

Doc.
Wow, that gun blued hammer is beautiful! Was it hard to polish up? What did the bluing cost you, if you don't mind me asking.

-Lurius
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Lis
Lis

November 2nd, 2007, 8:53 pm #7

... But I'd saved the whole U-joint spider. It'd been used, but was still in pretty good shape, but was unlabeled and in a box of random parts, so I don't know what it fits.

I was actually looking, however, for a box of similar needles that are roughly twice as long, that came out of a Toronado front-drive halfshaft. I know I saved a boxful of those somewhere, and I seem to recall they were nearly an inch long.

I have no idea where they are though, but I found the (probably Chevy truck) joint while looking.

It's things like this that are the reason I'm a packrat.

Doc.
Instances like that make me think of my dad and his father... They each have a huge garage (or in grampa's case a large garage, a full normal sized one, a couple sheds and a yard) full of stuff. I honestly believe I could rebuild and entire vehicle or three, another garage, and a house from all the STUFF they have piled up with still enough leftover to provide a good collection of rather useful things.

I think hording is hereditary. closes door to the spare room Fortunately my junk is still mostly on the smaller side with more delicate small stuff tools so far.

Nicely done on the anvil with the spare bearings! That's quite intuitive.
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Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

November 3rd, 2007, 9:27 am #8

I've been a packrat all my life. Right now I have endless boxes and rooms full of stuff- and that's a big problem. As I mentioned before, I'm pretty mucch completely out of both floorspace and bench space in the shop. It's a wreck, it's a mess, and it's in desperate need to being taken care of.

But much of it is useful- I'm not entirely sure how, but then, I probably wasn't entirely sure how I was going to use that U-joint when I saved it- and so it needs to be properly stored.

One of these days I might even do that.

Doc.
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CRySyS
CRySyS

November 4th, 2007, 3:32 am #9

My grandfather is a pack rat, he has a huge backyard with an old garage and scrap metal pile full of old stuff that would probably take a few dump trucks to get rid of. As a kid it was absolutely incredible to go play out there but the parents weren't too thrilled as can be imagined. But we played anyway.

I have a tendency to collect various random "useful" items as well but I've managed to spontaneously develop a yearly schedule that keeps it in check. Once a year or so, and it's pretty random, something in my brain switches gears and I clean house. Some of the cooler stuff and sentimental items tend to survive the culling but all the little, "I could do -this- with -this- so I'll hold on to it." crap gets tossed in one day in a mad rush while I can still bring myself to do it. By the next morning I won't be able to toss anything again so I have to get it in the trash and out of site right away.

Then I have a nice living space for a few weeks until once again the guy who never ships anything starts tucking useful sized cardboard boxes into corners and closets.

I think the culling is a defense mechanism to avoid being a character I saw as a kid. I remember visiting a creepy old farmhouse with my dad and grandfather where a toothless old farmer lived. I don't recall the nature of the visit, it was over my head at the time, but inside the little house were full brown paper bags stacked along every wall and on every horizontal surface. There were single lane walkways around the house but all available space was otherwise reserved for storage of god-knows what in those sacks. The farmer was showing my grandfather a wall clock he had picked up used and didn't know how to wind. That was because it was battery powered. Gramps explained that he needed two AA batteries for the clock. I swear this guy walked down the hall, reached into a seemingly random bag without even looking and pulled out a brand new package of AA Duracells. I have achieved similar feats when working on a workbench that appears to others to be a bomb site so I know that this level of compulsion is simmering in my own head somewhere ready to take over. That keeps me aware of my junk collection.

Excuse me, I have to go take out the garbage now.
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Ken Majors
Ken Majors

November 4th, 2007, 3:25 pm #10

One of the small projects I was working on today, was an older Spyder that a local customer had gotten cheap/free because the previous owner attempted to do a "trigger job" to it- apparently with a bench grinder.

Now, this is actually a pretty easy fix. Here's a trick; music wire works great as a sort of hardfacing rod. It's fairly high-carbon, and because a small button-weld/tack-weld cools very quickly (even on a small part like a sear) it pretty much self-quenches, leaving a fairly hard surface.

I usually dunk it in water immediately after welding, to help it along. It's almost impossible to get it so hard it's brittle, but with a bit of luck, you can get a fresh surface that's too hard to file.

After that, just shape and dress with a grinder/Dremel and some stones, and you're back in business. Assuming you already have a TIG in the shop, it's way faster than trying to order a replacement sear, or find a "parts" gun to strip.

Anyway, as I was doing this one today, I reflected that it'd be nice if I could do the same thing to my anvil.

My anvil is a very good-quality Peter Wright that's very likely a little over a century old. (Roughly 1885 to no later than 1910.) The face is so hard it flattens a centerpunch that can put a dent in a new Nicholson file. I'm guessing somewhere around Rockwell 70C, but that's no more than a guess.

However, as good as it is, it's been used hard for much of that intervening century, and is now badly chipped, slightly swaybacked, worn down, rounded over and blunted. There is nothing even close to a sharp corner anywhere on the working face. The best spot still has no less than a 1/4" radius.

I've heavily researched methods of fixing it, mainly looking at hardfacing rods for stick welders. I went so far as to buy over $100 in rods, only to find out they didn't work for beans.

Doing another one of these sears got me thinking; hardfacing TIG rod, while much slower, might work where the stick rod failed. If I worked on a very small area at a time, and made very small and short beads, I suspected that I might just be able to build up the corners- and just the corners- with some steel that, while not as hard as the main face, would at least be much harder than plain MIG wire, and probably somewhat harder than even good hardfacing rod.

So as an experiment, I tried it, working from one of the back corners. Here's what I started with:



I ground out most of the rust...



And tried a little bit with some 1/16" music wire. It worked, albeit being slow. I kept a wet rag on hand to "quench" the welds even further- or at least to keep any residual heat from drawing a temper out- and I ended up with beads that were for the most part too hard to file.

Hardness varied a bit, though, as there were definitely spots soft enough to file, but even this would be acceptable, if no other options were available, simply to get a usable square corner or two.

But that made me think- what if I had an even higher-carbon-content filler rod? Something that'd land file-hard if you so much as looked at it funny. So I started thinking, what do I have that would be a very-high-carbon steel, but close enough to "filler rod" size that I could actually weld with it?

After pondering that one for a few more hours, it finally hit me:



Needle bearings! These are the "loose" needles out of an old truck universal joint spider, a little over 1/16" in diameter and roughly 3/8" long. I know bearing steels have a lot more in them than just carbon, but I also know they come very, very hard.

So after making a reservation for a nice, padded room over the weekend, I sat down to try and weld a 140-pound anvil with filler rods three-eighths of an inch long.

It was actually pretty easy, just time-consuming. I'd take a moment to tack up six or seven short rods, each with a bearing on both ends:



... Which was a simple tap-and-tack with the TIG.

I'd make a bead of about one bearing long, and immediately quench it with a wet rag. I stopped frequently to let the anvil cool- it never got "hot", but I wanted it as cool as possible for maximum quench on the welds.

I was just experimenting, so I was only doing a small section. It still took a while, but eventually I had a decent build-up:



And, with a little grinding and sanding, I have a corner again:



It's not perfect. There's definitely a few softish spots, but the bulk of it is too hard to file. The "seam" between the weld and the rest of the face is shallow, and only there because the top face is "domed" slightly. I don't (yet) want to grind it down to meet flush, in order to preserve as much original face as possible.

It's also horrifically slow, and very costly in shield gas.

But, all that said, if I do it a little at a time, and take my time, I think I can restore most of the corners to a useful state, as well as repair other damage like that spalled crater seen in the pics, aft of the hardy hole. (The hardy will probably also get it's corners built back up, as well as filling in that chip in the pritchel hole.)

Of course, while I had the big heavy lump up on the welding table, I figured I'd take care of at least one other thing that's been bugging me. The nose, or horn, has lost at least half an inch, and was thus badly blunted:



This ones' easy, though. The horn, like the bulk of the main body, is mostly pure wrought iron, which meant I needed nothing more sophisticated than a good MIG to patch it.

First, clean off the rust:



Then just squirt some hot steel on...



The just grind to shape and sand smooth.



Took perhaps ten minutes, all told. Easy and quick, and not only restores some needed functionality (like for these) but also makes it look better. More complete. Not a big thing, but hey, I'm the guy that polished and gun-blued his hammer, okay?

Doc.
Blahblahblahblah
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