Honda scraps flood-damaged cars in Thailand

Honda scraps flood-damaged cars in Thailand

Webwolf
Webwolf

December 28th, 2011, 4:22 am #1

Man, this makes the gearhead in me hurt, to see all those cars be ruined by mud and water. But, as a person who formerly owned a used car that suffered catastrophic flood damage before it was resold, I do know it's for the best.

http://photoblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/20 ... and-floods
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sniper1rfa
sniper1rfa

December 28th, 2011, 5:04 pm #2

How the hell could you possibly clean, fix, and sell a thousand flood cars in any even remotely economical fashion? I mean, that's getting into completely stripping the car out, washing the chassis, and rebuilding it. Pointless.
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Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward

December 28th, 2011, 6:37 pm #3

Here in the states we've had plenty of flooded cars sold as good... and that's where it's easier to track a car to its origin. I've personally seen two that I KNEW were flood cars over the years. I don't blame Honda for not wanting to have those cars being held as examples of Honda's products.
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sniper1rfa
sniper1rfa

December 28th, 2011, 9:00 pm #4

You would think that honda wouldn't make such a point of it. I figure they would just scrap them as a matter of course.
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CF
CF

December 28th, 2011, 9:15 pm #5

Man, this makes the gearhead in me hurt, to see all those cars be ruined by mud and water. But, as a person who formerly owned a used car that suffered catastrophic flood damage before it was resold, I do know it's for the best.

http://photoblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/20 ... and-floods
In other news: Racers in the ChumpCar, and 24 Hours of LeMons, series flock to Thailand....
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namrepus221
namrepus221

December 28th, 2011, 10:39 pm #6

You would think that honda wouldn't make such a point of it. I figure they would just scrap them as a matter of course.
Publically announcing their destruction is good PR. It cuts down on potential fraud and keeps the brand image in tact.

If honda didn't destroy them and they found their way to market as new cars, would they want that kind of bad publicity? That they knowingly sold ruined cars as new?

I'd hope they wouldn't.
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Austin J
Austin J

December 29th, 2011, 2:27 am #7

In other news: Racers in the ChumpCar, and 24 Hours of LeMons, series flock to Thailand....
That would be interesting. Flood of Honda cars as they wash out the track.
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Bruce Bergman
Bruce Bergman

December 29th, 2011, 11:55 am #8

Publically announcing their destruction is good PR. It cuts down on potential fraud and keeps the brand image in tact.

If honda didn't destroy them and they found their way to market as new cars, would they want that kind of bad publicity? That they knowingly sold ruined cars as new?

I'd hope they wouldn't.
There are folks over there in the car sales business with absolutely no scruples too. If those flood-destroyed cars got sold off complete and un-crushed as scrap, they'd find them being cleaned out, patched up, and being sold off to unsuspecting buyers in days.

And if they try to go the CarFax route by reporting the bad VINs and blocking their registration ("Salvage" titling) there'll be a new black market in fake VIN tags and forged paperwork to invent new clean VINs.

You have to totally rebuild or replace every single complex mechanical system and electronic device on the car, and the main wiring harness, or you'll fight endless corrosion failures. And that's going to cost more than the car is worth.

Might be able to flush out the engine and transmission and other big mechanical parts, if they were submerged for a few weeks they've got rust started in internal spaces where it'll pop up as trouble in a year or two.

The only safe way to do it is break the cars and strip them down to component level parts, then they can be inspected and used as spares. But even then, someone will just hose off and crate up the transmission and sell it as "New!"
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sniper1rfa
sniper1rfa

December 29th, 2011, 12:20 pm #9

You don't scrap a thousand cars by selling to the local chop shop.

I was just surprised they said "to prevent resale" rather than "because they're totally f'd up."
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Someone
Someone

December 29th, 2011, 7:32 pm #10

They're drawing attention to the fact that they destroyed the cars, leaving the Thai public with the impression that it's not worth it for the manufacturer to try repairing flood damaged cars. It may be true, or it might be worth salvaging bits or frames out of the cars - I don't know the economics.

That leaves the public distrusting most of the used cars on the market. Not only the ones labeled as flood recovered, but also the ones the used car merchants were never anywhere near water. Used car merchants would never lie about something like that. As a result, the public will be more inclined to buy new cars instead of old.

I know that after Katrina, Ike and the other flooding events in this part of the country, I wouldn't touch a used car from then unless I personally knew its provenance.
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