Doc! someone has been sneeking into you labs!

Doc! someone has been sneeking into you labs!

Joined: October 11th, 2014, 3:36 am

July 4th, 2018, 12:44 am #1

Because after watching this video ( ) I could only think of the crazy experiments that have been done there.
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Joined: September 12th, 2014, 3:32 am

July 4th, 2018, 3:42 pm #2

In order:
"Substance N" - Our old friend(?) Chlorine Triflouride (ClF3)
Azidoazide Azide (C2N14)
Dimethylcadmium (CH3-Cd-CH3) Excessivly toxic.
Thioacetone (C3H6S) 'oh gods the stench'
Fluoroantimonic acid (H2FSbF6) 

I am amused that Derek Lowe's site was cited *twice* under the sources list.😁
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 4th, 2018, 6:58 pm #3

I seem to recall from an earlier list, that one of the most dangerous chemicals was... an iodine compound, maybe? A quick google isn't coming up with what I was thinking of, but as I recall, some researcher died from one drop- on a gloved hand.

I still remember being given a chemistry set as a kid- back when such things were actually fun. Mine included things like potassium cyanide and elemental arsenic. 😁

Doc.
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Joined: January 4th, 2016, 11:46 pm

July 4th, 2018, 7:06 pm #4

Explosion - from the Latin, 'oh my god, my eyebrows'
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 4th, 2018, 7:30 pm #5

That's the one. Mercury, iodine, what's the difference? 😁

Not... you know, to make light of the lady's unfortunate death.

Doc.
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Joined: January 24th, 2017, 4:37 pm

July 4th, 2018, 7:41 pm #6

DocsMachine wrote: I seem to recall from an earlier list, that one of the most dangerous chemicals was... an iodine compound, maybe? A quick google isn't coming up with what I was thinking of, but as I recall, some researcher died from one drop- on a gloved hand.

I still remember being given a chemistry set as a kid- back when such things were actually fun. Mine included things like potassium cyanide and elemental arsenic. 😁

Doc.
Nitrogen Tri-Iodide perhaps? NI3.  Used to make it with iodine crystals and anhydrous ammonia. Painted on the sidewalk to dry, it was like land mines for ants... It was that sensitive.
AD ASTRA, AUT VIAM INVENIUM AUT FACIUM
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Joined: November 8th, 2017, 3:33 am

July 5th, 2018, 3:14 am #7

My high school Physics teacher had to pay to replace a sink full of glassware in his college chemistry lab.  He put a small dish of NI3 in the sink to dry and covered the sink with a heavy slab of whatever; but, he didn't remove the other stuff from the sink first. It exploded and took a few hundred dollars (in 1970 something money) of glassware with it.  The algebra teacher at the same high school launched a cracker tin ( punched with a few holes and a block of Sodium, from the chem lab, on top of a small wire stand) in the college's duck pond.  It made it about 1/2 way across before sinking, exploding, and blowing water, duck pond mud, and feathers sky high,  covering the windows to the cafeteria that was across the street.  Interestingly, both events were at the same college many years apart.  I too went to that college.
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Joined: August 16th, 2016, 11:47 am

July 5th, 2018, 4:23 am #8

Emory?
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Joined: November 8th, 2017, 3:33 am

July 5th, 2018, 5:06 am #9

Yup.
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Joined: January 11th, 2016, 8:57 pm

July 5th, 2018, 5:38 am #10

Mrham wrote: ......The algebra teacher at the same high school launched a cracker tin ( punched with a few holes and a block of Sodium, from the chem lab, on top of a small wire stand) in the college's duck pond.  It made it about 1/2 way across before sinking, exploding, and blowing water, duck pond mud, and feathers sky high,  covering the windows to the cafeteria that was across the street.  Interestingly, both events were at the same college many years apart.  I too went to that college.
Try 1 ton barrels of Sodium war surplus, rolled into a lake for entertainment value...
Breakfast.com halted. Cereal port not ready.
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