Doc's 2018 Summer Projects Updates Page!

Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

8:46 AM - Jul 14, 2018 #1

This is partly for me, to help keep track of what I've got going on. ๐Ÿ˜ I'll also try to 'sticky' this, since we can do that now, and keep it updated. Each one of these pages will eventually be reposted over in the Projects Pages but 'til I can afford the time to do that, The Guild will remain the repository of choice. ๐Ÿ˜

#1: The Springfield Lathe - - - - - - - - - - - [On Hold]
#2: The Stockbridge Shaper - - - - - - - - - [On Hold]
#3: The Nichols Horizontal Mill - - - - - - - -[On Hold]
#4: The Wellsaw Horizontal Bandsaw - -ย  [In Progress]
#5: The Homebuilt KMG Belt Grinder - - - [Completed]
#6: The Grizzly DRO Install - - - - - - - - -ย  [2/3rds Done
#7: The Cutlass 12-Bolt Install - - - - - - - -[Completed]
#8: The Miller MIG Welder - - - - - - - - - - [Completed]
#9: The Logan CNC Conversion - - - - - - [In Progress]
#10: The New Wilmont Belt Grinder - - - -[Completed]
#11: The New Computer desk - - - - - - - -[Ain't Even Started Yet]
#12: The Shop Compressed Air Lines - - [Completed]

I have a couple more I'd like to start, but I'd also like to get a few more of these either completed or at least further along before I do so. For example, I need to get the bandsaw back together in order to help cut the parts for the desk, so there's that. ๐Ÿ˜

Also, an update on the three big machine projects: The guy that was supposed to haul them to the States, was supposed to have left six weeks ago. I should have had them back by now. ๐Ÿ˜ซ

But, his shop is going like gangbusters right now, and he's got a lot of contract work to complete first. So it's looking like it may be another six weeks before I even get those parts back.

Really, it doesn't hurt my schedule too much, I just hope to have 'em back at least before the snow flies. ๐Ÿ˜

Doc.

[October Edit]

Well, summer is over even by Lower 48 standards, so how'd I do?

The latest update on the three machines I shipped off- that I should have had back some four months ago- is that they haven't even been started yet. I might well wind up that those will be shifted over to the first projects of 2019! ๐Ÿ™„

The Computer Desk project never got off the sketchpad. I just didn't have the time for that involved a project. I'll keep refining my notes, shoot for it come spring.

Five got completed, which leaves three: The DRO install, the bandsaw rebuild, and tweaking some more on the CNC lathe.

The Logan, and to a lesser extent, the DRO, got set aside because those are purely-indoor projects. They took a backseat to the projects that either had to be done outside (the car axle) or involved doing some of it outside (welding, grinding, paint stripping, etc.)

And the bandsaw should be done in a couple of weeks- most of which time will be spent waiting for parts to arrive, and waiting for paint to dry. ๐Ÿ˜

So even though September and October are not really "summer" months, if I get the bandsaw back together, that'll make six projects finished, out of twelve- and three of the others were outside of my control. That's not a bad score. ๐Ÿ˜

Now it's time to start up our Winter project series!

Doc.
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Joined: 7:01 AM - Sep 16, 2014

2:11 PM - Jul 18, 2018 #2

Thought: If he's "going like gangbusters", does he want to shed any of that work onto you, and you repay him by chipping in with a set of tires, or for more of the gas for his trip?ย  If you aren't careful you'll hit a point where it's too late for him to leave, do his business and get back, and then he cancels the run till spring and the machines are down for the winter.ย  Or you have to put them back together to use them, and disassemble again, which just adds to the pain.
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

10:08 PM - Jul 18, 2018 #3

Different kind of work. His shop is set up for CNC production, producing parts in bulk. He does very little one-off job-shop stuff. I can do short-run production (obviously, been doing it for years) but there's just no way I could compete with his per-part prices.

On the three machines, the fact is, I don't "need" any of them. If it came down to not being back together 'til next summer, it's really no skin off my nose.

I mean, one of them's a freakin' century-old shaper fer cryinoutloud. ๐Ÿ˜

The big lathe and horizontal mill will both be useful once done, but they're hardly my only machines at the moment.

Doc.
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

10:20 AM - Jul 25, 2018 #4

Unlisted Project #13 Update! The lights are done!

Longtime readers may recall a couple of years ago when I mentioned I was starting to swap out the old 4' fluorescent light fixtures in the shop with new LED units. I started out simply swapping fixture-for-fixture when the old fluorescent would die, and wound up with a messy mix of lights.

Worse, a lot of the original lights had been hung kind of haphazardly over the years, basically added whenever we'd need more light over a project or something. So there were some oriented east-west and others running north-south. Not terrible, but I have to admit it always kind of annoyed me.

Well, I'd had about half the lights replaced with the LEDs when I decided to rework the whole mess. To come up with an organized pattern that put the same number, or more, lights in a more even pattern, in the same area.

I played with a couple designs, came up with a simple one that put 15 lights up in an even pattern, instead of the original 14 randomly-spaced, and finally, this summer, I set out to do it.

Helped, of course, by the fact one bay didn't have a giant lathe in the way anymore, and that I'd gotten a few other things sorted away or at least mobile. ๐Ÿ˜

Sorry, no pics. I tried to take one at the beginning, but I was taking pictures of lights- it was basically a muddy dark background with random bars of light. ๐Ÿ˜‹

Anyway, yesterday or the day before, I finally got the last corner cleared out, and that gave me ladder access to hang the last light. (And, incidentally, get to where I need to run the next section of air line.)

I still need to redo the lights in the machine room, but that's more or less on hold as I've been thinking of finally putting in a proper ceiling. And that needs to wait 'til I finish the air lines and a few other bits. ๐Ÿ˜

But, the new lights make it notably brighter in the main shop, as well as more evenly lit. Plus, I put a Kill-A-Watt meter on the old lights- some predated me and were old magnetic ballasts. The lights lasted forever (as I understand it, they were put up in the early 80s) but according to the meter, drew something like 95 watts. (Per fixture, of course.)

The LEDs draw 35. ๐Ÿ˜

Doc.
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

8:50 AM - Aug 16, 2018 #5

Well crap.

Well, the fellow that was supposed to have delivered my parts to the grinder back in June only just now left for the states- two months later than originally planned.

Now, this in and of itself isn't a problem. My schedule for these machines is wide open, and honestly, if I didn't get the parts back 'til next spring, it wouldn't be a huge issue.

The problem is, that due in part to the delay, the grinder has a significant backlog of work, and once he receives my parts, likely won't be able to start on them for a month.

Why is that a problem, if my schedule is wide open? Readers of the original Springfield post will recall that the guy doing the delivery was actually heading for California to pick up some machine tools, and would be dropping my parts off in Vancouver, BC. He would then continue on to Cali, get his work done, and return, picking my parts back up in about ten days.

Previously, the grinder assured me this would be no problem, as that's ample time to get the work done. But now, there's several jobs ahead of me, and mine likely won't be finished for a month.

A month, of course, is longer than the ten days or so my delivery guy will be there for- and considerably longer than a maybe day-or-two window if things could be fudged that close.

Meaning I'm going to have to pay to have some three thousand pounds of iron commercially shipped from BC to Alaska. An additional cost of anywhere from $2,500 to $4,000, maybe even more.

So, I was originally supposed to have my parts back by around the end of June, and it was supposed to cost me around $700- roughly half of the trips' gas money, which was a good deal for both of us.

Instead, I likely won't have them back 'til around the end of October, and it'll cost me an additional two to four grand.

On top of the several grand it's going to cost me just to have the grinding itself done.

I'm not what you might call a happy camper right now. This will very probably push any potential purchase of a CNC mill back by at least six months, if not a full year, depending on how sales go.

Pardon me if I'm a bit grumpy for a couple days.

Doc.
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Joined: 4:36 PM - Feb 02, 2015

2:51 PM - Aug 16, 2018 #6

Would it be any cheaper to get Buddy Boy to make another trip back for the damn parts? Have you been polishing that mallet?
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Joined: 7:01 AM - Sep 16, 2014

8:36 PM - Aug 16, 2018 #7

Call All the Truck Rental places and get the lay of the land - One Way can be a slight premium or a Painful Nasty one - but still less than paying for shipping.ย  Andย check with the local Car Dealers, as they need to get their new truck stock up there and you can load the lathe and mill beds in the back and give it a proper Break-In run.ย 

If the rental co's need to balance their inventories and get trucks & trailers brought Up to Alaska or Down to civilization, you can get the rental for nearly free - or actually free if they would have to pay someone to move them.ย  And a gas card too if you play it right.ย  Or a One Way plane ticket down to get the truck, and a Regional Manager to meet you at the airport...ย  Might make a Round Trip with a trailer stuffed in the back of the truck on the way down (and several trailers stacked up, strapped down and hitched to the rear) worth it.ย 

If they're really desperate, recruit a friend or relative (or two) to drive a second big truck & trailer stack down and carpool back with you.ย  Or vice versa depending.ย 

And make sure you have a spare tire, as Plan B in case the rental company Roadside Assistance says "Tomorrow..."ย 
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

2:03 AM - Aug 17, 2018 #8

Typeminer wrote:Would it be any cheaper to get Buddy Boy to make another trip back for the damn parts? Have you been polishing that mallet?
-No, on either point. ๐Ÿ˜

On the former, the reason he hadn't left yet was simply that he was so busy in the shop. He has a reputation for quality work at fair prices, and has been somewhat swamped all summer. I'm sure not going to begrudge him that- especially, as I said, my personal schedule is wide open as far as these machines are concerned.

And no, I'm not "polishing the mallet" because the problem is really not his fault. To a certain degree it is, but I really can't blame him- no matter what, he's doing me a huge favor. Barring anything else, he at least saved me a bundle on shipping the parts down. And it was just bad luck that everybody's schedules didn't mesh properly- I'm sure not going to yell and scream about that.

Getting him to make a return trip in a month would likely be difficult, and not terribly fair. Even if I paid for the gas for the entire trip, it'd take him out of his shop for at least a week, and that could cost some real business.

Unfortunately, I don't own a truck of sufficient capacity or an adequate trailer so I can't make the trip myself. I know at least four people that have both, but all of them have sufficient other obligations that taking a week off for a 5,000 mile trip would be a pretty hard sell. And no, none of them would be likely to loan me said vehicles- not because I'm untrustworthy, but said trucks are part of each families' daily drivers.

An option is to fly down and rent a U-Haul, but using their online calculator for a even a 10' box truck (the lathe casting is almost 12' long, but may be able to be slid in diagonally) would be over $2,500, presumably plus gas (minimum $1,000) plus the flight down ($250) and so forth. That's not really any cheaper than just having the things commercially shipped up.

Trucks heading up to Alaska are almost always packed full- that and barges is how virtually all goods get into the State. I might have been able to get a deal on an LTL load heading out- trucks head out light all the time- but it'll be unlikely to get one heading in.

Doc.
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Joined: 1:36 AM - Nov 30, 2014

4:53 PM - Aug 18, 2018 #9

DocsMachine wrote: Trucks heading up to Alaska are almost always packed full- that and barges is how virtually all goods get into the State. I might have been able to get a deal on an LTL load heading out- trucks head out light all the time- but it'll be unlikely to get one heading in.
A long shot - check on Yesterday's Tractors and see if there's anyone heading up your way.ย  Folks go empty one way a fair amount and list their trips on YT.ย  I had a 10EE hauled from Illinois to New Mexico for the cost of gas, basically.ย  A trip to Alaska is unlikely but you never know....
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Joined: 1:31 PM - Oct 15, 2015

1:17 PM - Aug 20, 2018 #10

quickย  link to what rkepler is speaking of:ย http://www.yesterdaystractors.com/cgi-bin/haulquery.pl
2003 BIOHAZARD ELECTRO COCKER
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