Daisy Duke's

Daisy Duke's

Jan Thuisblijf
Jan Thuisblijf

September 30th, 2011, 7:27 pm #1

For those who understand Afrikaans/Dutch: we would call that an "Amperbroekie"
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Chris
Chris

October 1st, 2011, 1:35 am #2

... "And just what's wrong with that?"

Well, let's see...

Pain

Contact bruising of skin

Welts

More pain

Cursing in pain (to the point that you make NEW curse words!)

Soreness

Reddening of skin (despite ANY PAINT color!)

Even though I do not play paintball, I know it'd be asinine to
go with out proper protective gear on one's body or face.
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Tohri
Tohri

October 1st, 2011, 1:50 am #3

I think she'd be able to manage.
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Kitkun
Kitkun

October 1st, 2011, 5:38 am #4

Though I got the distinct impression that none of them were talking about it in terms of protection on the field, anyways...
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Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

October 1st, 2011, 6:07 am #5

I think she'd be able to manage.
Well, naturally we take a few... artistic liberties with a comic strip.

In reality, an actual anthro/furry type person would be well protected from paintballs even without a jersey or pants. Depending, I suppose, on how "fluffy" he or she was- Pirta's thick snow leopard coat would offer better protection than, say, a puma's short, close coat.

And yes, I have empirical evidence.

I've had to shoot at moose once or twice over the years, in order to shoo them away from parking areas, or from bothering other animals, or from eating ornamental bushes, etc.

And I'm not sure I have ever actually broken a ball on one.

The moose has a pretty thick coat, especially in wintertime. It's not brown bear thick, but it's still somewhat fluffy- enough so that shooting a moose is a lot like shooting a curtain or hanging towel. The ball just hits and falls to the ground. It almost never bounces or ricochets.

I used to have a video of one such shoot, years ago. Not sure what I ever did with it.

Ditto the one time I had to shoot an annoying dog that was getting into the trash. It wasn't fluffy like a malamute or wolf, but definitely had longer hair than, say, a labrador. Same game, though with a little more bounce. I only hit it maybe three times, none broke.

Our TWB critters would probably see about the same thing- Pirta, Doc, Jinx, etc. would probably be damn near invincible on the field unless you hit their marker or mask. In fact, you'd probably have to find a very short-haired type before you started getting shots to break like normal- like a puma or cougar, or a dalmatian or whippet, the aforementioned labrador or a shorthair housecat, etc.

Which makes you wonder how the sport might have evolved- if it even ever got started- in a 'furry' world. Maybe like the old "lazer tag" games, you'd have to wear a special vest or a shirt, that had hard plates to improve breakage.

Doc.
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Andrick
Andrick

October 1st, 2011, 7:35 am #6

is a liability in a modern world. Just think about the tools and moving parts around your shop that long, thick body fur would complicate, clog, or catch with painful and potentially disastrous results. A lathe snagging a shirt sleeve is bad but that same lathe snagging a mass clump of forearm fur is grimmer because the luckiest scenario of the snagged item ripping free of the host is a bit bloodier for fur as opposed to sleeve. Unless the fur is kept oily by the characters not bathing or applying some after-bath body lotion made just for furs, that mass of hair would soak up most chemicals that would simply be rinsed off non-furred hands and arms. Acids, washes, fluxes, primers, and catalyzing agents would seep down the follicle into the skin where it would cause irritation, blemishes (affecting hair color and shape), and sores.

Besides, can you see a person with two inches of fur growing out of his fingers working a power drill or even a simple hammer without getting some of that caught in the threads, drill bit, and/or nail hole? Doc and Roger would be shaving their hands and forearms if not daily then weekly. And this doesn't even get into isseus of biology, anatomy, and physiology.

It is for those stated reasons I had always assumed TWB's crew to be strange looking humans. Doc and Bruno are really big guys who derive their physical strength and near imperviousness from being large. Pirta is like a guy I know from North Dakota who goes walking in 18" snow wearing shorts and tennis shoes - crazy or just acclimated, I'll let you judge. The fact that the crew where clothes, often in layers, which would drop non-sweating creatures to heat stroke under prolonged activity. The differences, like mouse pizza and harp seal combo meals, I chalk to a greater tolerance for eccentricities since these are things humans can feasibly eat or otherwise "do" that are just not popular in the real world.

At least that is my take on TWB.
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Doc Nickel
Doc Nickel

October 1st, 2011, 9:37 am #7

I've said the same thing a few times- I look at the characters more as "people with tails" rather than "animals walking upright".

Apart from the occasional gag- like Jake's stink or Doc eating a whole seal- I try not to overdo the "animal" side of things. I'm not above the occasional joke, but I also don't want to make it into a strip like "Kevin & Kell", where every single gag revolves around some animal aspect or carnivorism vs. herbivorism or whatever.

We talked about this here just a month or two ago- there are strips out there that go through heavy mental gymnastics to "justify" having, for example, predator species working alongside prey species. My usual example is noting that, if TWB were "realistic", Shoey would have eaten Rainy years ago.

And Bandit would be about the size of two of Doc's toes.

But yeah, if "furries" were real, there's all sorts of things that would be different than what we see today. One of the main ones is chairs and seating, which would have to accomodate a wide variety of tail sizes. You have something as big and floofy as Jake's tail, how would you handle it if, say, you had to use a dirty bus station toilet? Hold it in your lap? Let it rest on the floor?

Due to tails, would bathroom stalls have that open space at the bottom? Where would you put your tail when having to drive a car long distances? Would the seatback have a hole so you could let it through to the passenger footwell? Or would seats have a sort of 'channel' so you could either fold it down the center or off to one side?

And yes, as you noted, there's a good chance machinery would have more guards, or a different kind of guards. Then again, a person growing up with fur- and a tail- would learn (sometimes the hard way) how to handle it. One presumes that those with particularly brushy paws- like Snowshoe and Pirta- would very likely have that fur regularly trimmed, just as we go to a barber or stylist today. I'd imagine gadgets like the Flowbee would be more common and more complex...

One might even presume that those that have to work in a nasty or dusty environment- miners, let's say, or asphalt layers- might trim their fur extra short, like a soldier or Marine trims their hair back to a nub.

Heck, we could get into all kinds of things- that oddly enough, few "furry" comics really touch on. Such as, would things like perfumes and deodorants be as popular or as widely used if people relied so much more on their sense of smell? Would you have to have more divisions for sporting events? Like the Olympics- instead of just mens and womens divisions, would we have divisions for cheetahs and greyhounds?

It would be interesting to see a really well-done strip or graphic novel that covers this kind of thing, and actually, I'm surprised we haven't seen one already. Dozens of sci-fi writers spend years and multiple books developing rich, detailed alternate worlds with alien physics and alien anatomies, but the best the anthro guys can do is Kevin & Kell jokes about eating your neighbors?

Doc.
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Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward

October 1st, 2011, 12:33 pm #8

is a liability in a modern world. Just think about the tools and moving parts around your shop that long, thick body fur would complicate, clog, or catch with painful and potentially disastrous results. A lathe snagging a shirt sleeve is bad but that same lathe snagging a mass clump of forearm fur is grimmer because the luckiest scenario of the snagged item ripping free of the host is a bit bloodier for fur as opposed to sleeve. Unless the fur is kept oily by the characters not bathing or applying some after-bath body lotion made just for furs, that mass of hair would soak up most chemicals that would simply be rinsed off non-furred hands and arms. Acids, washes, fluxes, primers, and catalyzing agents would seep down the follicle into the skin where it would cause irritation, blemishes (affecting hair color and shape), and sores.

Besides, can you see a person with two inches of fur growing out of his fingers working a power drill or even a simple hammer without getting some of that caught in the threads, drill bit, and/or nail hole? Doc and Roger would be shaving their hands and forearms if not daily then weekly. And this doesn't even get into isseus of biology, anatomy, and physiology.

It is for those stated reasons I had always assumed TWB's crew to be strange looking humans. Doc and Bruno are really big guys who derive their physical strength and near imperviousness from being large. Pirta is like a guy I know from North Dakota who goes walking in 18" snow wearing shorts and tennis shoes - crazy or just acclimated, I'll let you judge. The fact that the crew where clothes, often in layers, which would drop non-sweating creatures to heat stroke under prolonged activity. The differences, like mouse pizza and harp seal combo meals, I chalk to a greater tolerance for eccentricities since these are things humans can feasibly eat or otherwise "do" that are just not popular in the real world.

At least that is my take on TWB.
"Shedding Season".
In a 'Furry' Doc-iverse, Hoover Inc. would be a Forbes Top Ten company.
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wolfteller
wolfteller

October 1st, 2011, 5:19 pm #9

I've said the same thing a few times- I look at the characters more as "people with tails" rather than "animals walking upright".

Apart from the occasional gag- like Jake's stink or Doc eating a whole seal- I try not to overdo the "animal" side of things. I'm not above the occasional joke, but I also don't want to make it into a strip like "Kevin & Kell", where every single gag revolves around some animal aspect or carnivorism vs. herbivorism or whatever.

We talked about this here just a month or two ago- there are strips out there that go through heavy mental gymnastics to "justify" having, for example, predator species working alongside prey species. My usual example is noting that, if TWB were "realistic", Shoey would have eaten Rainy years ago.

And Bandit would be about the size of two of Doc's toes.

But yeah, if "furries" were real, there's all sorts of things that would be different than what we see today. One of the main ones is chairs and seating, which would have to accomodate a wide variety of tail sizes. You have something as big and floofy as Jake's tail, how would you handle it if, say, you had to use a dirty bus station toilet? Hold it in your lap? Let it rest on the floor?

Due to tails, would bathroom stalls have that open space at the bottom? Where would you put your tail when having to drive a car long distances? Would the seatback have a hole so you could let it through to the passenger footwell? Or would seats have a sort of 'channel' so you could either fold it down the center or off to one side?

And yes, as you noted, there's a good chance machinery would have more guards, or a different kind of guards. Then again, a person growing up with fur- and a tail- would learn (sometimes the hard way) how to handle it. One presumes that those with particularly brushy paws- like Snowshoe and Pirta- would very likely have that fur regularly trimmed, just as we go to a barber or stylist today. I'd imagine gadgets like the Flowbee would be more common and more complex...

One might even presume that those that have to work in a nasty or dusty environment- miners, let's say, or asphalt layers- might trim their fur extra short, like a soldier or Marine trims their hair back to a nub.

Heck, we could get into all kinds of things- that oddly enough, few "furry" comics really touch on. Such as, would things like perfumes and deodorants be as popular or as widely used if people relied so much more on their sense of smell? Would you have to have more divisions for sporting events? Like the Olympics- instead of just mens and womens divisions, would we have divisions for cheetahs and greyhounds?

It would be interesting to see a really well-done strip or graphic novel that covers this kind of thing, and actually, I'm surprised we haven't seen one already. Dozens of sci-fi writers spend years and multiple books developing rich, detailed alternate worlds with alien physics and alien anatomies, but the best the anthro guys can do is Kevin & Kell jokes about eating your neighbors?

Doc.
again, most anthros are people with tails, so most writers and artist focus on making the animals have a common "human" denominator. most writers do not account for the animals traits, at least in commic form, instead taking a baseline human and inserting animal traits that would not break "balance" in capabilities. (a generic wolf is a lot more overly capable then say.. a lizard) . if we switched and did, talking animals, say like kevin & kell, there is a lot details to think over. while we do not mind discussing it, there are enough different solutions, that nobody can agree on 1 common solution. so, most anthros decide to just go with people with tails so they can better concentrate on the overall plot rather then the minutae of details needed to make it work. also take into account, that "furries" is a mostly online community and as we all know, many people online are perfectly happy telling an undefended artist or writer, "U R DOING IT WRONG" until the artist decides to give up all together.
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Andrick
Andrick

October 1st, 2011, 6:24 pm #10

I've said the same thing a few times- I look at the characters more as "people with tails" rather than "animals walking upright".

Apart from the occasional gag- like Jake's stink or Doc eating a whole seal- I try not to overdo the "animal" side of things. I'm not above the occasional joke, but I also don't want to make it into a strip like "Kevin & Kell", where every single gag revolves around some animal aspect or carnivorism vs. herbivorism or whatever.

We talked about this here just a month or two ago- there are strips out there that go through heavy mental gymnastics to "justify" having, for example, predator species working alongside prey species. My usual example is noting that, if TWB were "realistic", Shoey would have eaten Rainy years ago.

And Bandit would be about the size of two of Doc's toes.

But yeah, if "furries" were real, there's all sorts of things that would be different than what we see today. One of the main ones is chairs and seating, which would have to accomodate a wide variety of tail sizes. You have something as big and floofy as Jake's tail, how would you handle it if, say, you had to use a dirty bus station toilet? Hold it in your lap? Let it rest on the floor?

Due to tails, would bathroom stalls have that open space at the bottom? Where would you put your tail when having to drive a car long distances? Would the seatback have a hole so you could let it through to the passenger footwell? Or would seats have a sort of 'channel' so you could either fold it down the center or off to one side?

And yes, as you noted, there's a good chance machinery would have more guards, or a different kind of guards. Then again, a person growing up with fur- and a tail- would learn (sometimes the hard way) how to handle it. One presumes that those with particularly brushy paws- like Snowshoe and Pirta- would very likely have that fur regularly trimmed, just as we go to a barber or stylist today. I'd imagine gadgets like the Flowbee would be more common and more complex...

One might even presume that those that have to work in a nasty or dusty environment- miners, let's say, or asphalt layers- might trim their fur extra short, like a soldier or Marine trims their hair back to a nub.

Heck, we could get into all kinds of things- that oddly enough, few "furry" comics really touch on. Such as, would things like perfumes and deodorants be as popular or as widely used if people relied so much more on their sense of smell? Would you have to have more divisions for sporting events? Like the Olympics- instead of just mens and womens divisions, would we have divisions for cheetahs and greyhounds?

It would be interesting to see a really well-done strip or graphic novel that covers this kind of thing, and actually, I'm surprised we haven't seen one already. Dozens of sci-fi writers spend years and multiple books developing rich, detailed alternate worlds with alien physics and alien anatomies, but the best the anthro guys can do is Kevin & Kell jokes about eating your neighbors?

Doc.
The comic, to which I will only allude because of its x-rated graphic nature, is a very grim rural-gothic story with characters of unsavory dispositions and murderous intent. The carefully crafted world is divided by nationality, ethnicity, and palpable racism that makes real world human disputes seem petty. The author could novelize the histories of the different people he depicts, the rise and fall of each civilization that came before the start of his comic, and the prevailing philosophies and religions that continue to influence the modern inhabitants of his fictional world.

The animalism of the inhabitants of this world is apparent and very alien. Scent becomes a powerful tool to those species with good sniffers to place times and events from incidental encounters - at one point the main character tells a supporting character to take a shower before going home to his wife because he smells lanolin and sex despite there being a significant gap of time between that character's encounter with a sheep-girl and the current meeting with the main character. The differences in size, strength, abilities, and uh... natural equipment are put on display for purpose. The tendencies for certain species to congregate together, the cycles of other species' heats, and the predilection for certain temperaments alters behaviors of standard fare animal people into these denizens of this author's world. The incompatibility of these denizens fills their forced interactions with suspicion, fear, disgust, envy, and hatred.

The author's forum has threads expounding on how unarmed fighting styles would work, the racial and ethnic slurs used by certain denizens against others, and the meanings of the artifacts (religious or otherwise) scattered throughout the comic.

That is one that I know of which is still being updated.
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