Can anyone ID this electrical enclosure?

Can anyone ID this electrical enclosure?

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 11th, 2017, 4:45 am #1

For anyone who's been following my Logan lathe CNC conversion, you might know that I picked up a mostly ready-to-go 2-axis controller from a local guy who had built it years ago, and was converting the machine back to manual.

The setup works, although as I'm utterly new to such things- and have little electrical knowledge to fall back on- it was something of a struggle to get it connected, wired and running.

Currently, the lathe is almost fully functional, and has been for nearly a year now. It still needs plenty of little detail work, but at least the electricals, and mechanical axis drives are pretty much 100%.

The main drawback is, and has been, my near-total ignorance of Mach 3, and the fact that M3 does not play well with Fusion 360, at least as far as turning goes. I can draw something in F360, even something pretty simple, but I have not yet had any luck whatsoever at getting the resulting toolpath to work in M3.

I was hoping to have more time to play with it this winter, when work tends to slow down a bit and I'm less likely to have outdoor projects in the works.

BUT... a new development has come along: Centroid, a big-name professional-level manufacturer of CNC controllers, has brought out a "home shop" CNC controller called the Acorn. It has lots of features I'm looking forward to- like direct connection of my VFD into the controller (Mach 3 can do it, kind of, if you juggle a few things, write a macro and buy an aftermarket board) connect to a modern PC through an Ethernet connection (M3 requires a parallel port- who even has those anymore?) run high-accuracy quadrature encoders, and more.

The lathe-software version is due to launch tomorrow, and I plan to pick one up as soon as I can.

The idea here is that I'd like to disconnect my current, functioning controller system, basically everything from the old XP computer (the newest M3 will run on) all the way to the plugs on the steppers, all as one unit.

And that will be replaced by a complete Centroid setup- I'll also have to get a couple new stepper controllers, but I was thinking about doing that anyway. Get away from the older MicroKinetics boards I have (which work, and are still being manufactured) and move up to a more industry-standard Gecko controller.

And as such, I'd like to start from scratch, and build a new box. The current setup looks like this:



And with the cover, it looks like this:



The enclosure is steel, fairly heavy duty, about 14-16" square, and about 4" deep. The cover has "keyhole" screw slots- loosen the four screws, slide it up slightly, lift it clear. No hinges or other latches.

I'd like to find another one, or something very close to it. Interestingly enough, I saw one just like it at the local secondhand shop about a year ago, and thought about picking it up.

Anybody have a brand name, or a general style? I've been looking up "electrical enclosures" and similar keywords for a while, but I'm not seeing anything I'd like.

Suggestions or recommendations?

Doc.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 11th, 2017, 4:47 am #2

I should clarify: I've seen plenty of enclosures I'd like to use, but they all seem surprisingly expensive.

Any chance I can get into something like that without spending a $300 bill?

Doc.
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Joined: March 8th, 2004, 11:48 pm

October 11th, 2017, 5:10 am #3

For anyone who's been following my Logan lathe CNC conversion, you might know that I picked up a mostly ready-to-go 2-axis controller from a local guy who had built it years ago, and was converting the machine back to manual.

The setup works, although as I'm utterly new to such things- and have little electrical knowledge to fall back on- it was something of a struggle to get it connected, wired and running.

Currently, the lathe is almost fully functional, and has been for nearly a year now. It still needs plenty of little detail work, but at least the electricals, and mechanical axis drives are pretty much 100%.

The main drawback is, and has been, my near-total ignorance of Mach 3, and the fact that M3 does not play well with Fusion 360, at least as far as turning goes. I can draw something in F360, even something pretty simple, but I have not yet had any luck whatsoever at getting the resulting toolpath to work in M3.

I was hoping to have more time to play with it this winter, when work tends to slow down a bit and I'm less likely to have outdoor projects in the works.

BUT... a new development has come along: Centroid, a big-name professional-level manufacturer of CNC controllers, has brought out a "home shop" CNC controller called the Acorn. It has lots of features I'm looking forward to- like direct connection of my VFD into the controller (Mach 3 can do it, kind of, if you juggle a few things, write a macro and buy an aftermarket board) connect to a modern PC through an Ethernet connection (M3 requires a parallel port- who even has those anymore?) run high-accuracy quadrature encoders, and more.

The lathe-software version is due to launch tomorrow, and I plan to pick one up as soon as I can.

The idea here is that I'd like to disconnect my current, functioning controller system, basically everything from the old XP computer (the newest M3 will run on) all the way to the plugs on the steppers, all as one unit.

And that will be replaced by a complete Centroid setup- I'll also have to get a couple new stepper controllers, but I was thinking about doing that anyway. Get away from the older MicroKinetics boards I have (which work, and are still being manufactured) and move up to a more industry-standard Gecko controller.

And as such, I'd like to start from scratch, and build a new box. The current setup looks like this:



And with the cover, it looks like this:



The enclosure is steel, fairly heavy duty, about 14-16" square, and about 4" deep. The cover has "keyhole" screw slots- loosen the four screws, slide it up slightly, lift it clear. No hinges or other latches.

I'd like to find another one, or something very close to it. Interestingly enough, I saw one just like it at the local secondhand shop about a year ago, and thought about picking it up.

Anybody have a brand name, or a general style? I've been looking up "electrical enclosures" and similar keywords for a while, but I'm not seeing anything I'd like.

Suggestions or recommendations?

Doc.
I see some on Zoro that look like that.

https://www.zoro.com/hoffman-enclosr-me ... 0UQAvD_BwE
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Joined: October 11th, 2017, 12:37 pm

October 11th, 2017, 12:43 pm #4

For anyone who's been following my Logan lathe CNC conversion, you might know that I picked up a mostly ready-to-go 2-axis controller from a local guy who had built it years ago, and was converting the machine back to manual.

The setup works, although as I'm utterly new to such things- and have little electrical knowledge to fall back on- it was something of a struggle to get it connected, wired and running.

Currently, the lathe is almost fully functional, and has been for nearly a year now. It still needs plenty of little detail work, but at least the electricals, and mechanical axis drives are pretty much 100%.

The main drawback is, and has been, my near-total ignorance of Mach 3, and the fact that M3 does not play well with Fusion 360, at least as far as turning goes. I can draw something in F360, even something pretty simple, but I have not yet had any luck whatsoever at getting the resulting toolpath to work in M3.

I was hoping to have more time to play with it this winter, when work tends to slow down a bit and I'm less likely to have outdoor projects in the works.

BUT... a new development has come along: Centroid, a big-name professional-level manufacturer of CNC controllers, has brought out a "home shop" CNC controller called the Acorn. It has lots of features I'm looking forward to- like direct connection of my VFD into the controller (Mach 3 can do it, kind of, if you juggle a few things, write a macro and buy an aftermarket board) connect to a modern PC through an Ethernet connection (M3 requires a parallel port- who even has those anymore?) run high-accuracy quadrature encoders, and more.

The lathe-software version is due to launch tomorrow, and I plan to pick one up as soon as I can.

The idea here is that I'd like to disconnect my current, functioning controller system, basically everything from the old XP computer (the newest M3 will run on) all the way to the plugs on the steppers, all as one unit.

And that will be replaced by a complete Centroid setup- I'll also have to get a couple new stepper controllers, but I was thinking about doing that anyway. Get away from the older MicroKinetics boards I have (which work, and are still being manufactured) and move up to a more industry-standard Gecko controller.

And as such, I'd like to start from scratch, and build a new box. The current setup looks like this:



And with the cover, it looks like this:



The enclosure is steel, fairly heavy duty, about 14-16" square, and about 4" deep. The cover has "keyhole" screw slots- loosen the four screws, slide it up slightly, lift it clear. No hinges or other latches.

I'd like to find another one, or something very close to it. Interestingly enough, I saw one just like it at the local secondhand shop about a year ago, and thought about picking it up.

Anybody have a brand name, or a general style? I've been looking up "electrical enclosures" and similar keywords for a while, but I'm not seeing anything I'd like.

Suggestions or recommendations?

Doc.
A company called Mouser here in Texas sells a box you might be interested in:

http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Bud ... Xp2Cniw%3d

I have used this enclosure for several projects.
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Joined: February 20th, 2016, 1:32 am

October 11th, 2017, 12:45 pm #5

For anyone who's been following my Logan lathe CNC conversion, you might know that I picked up a mostly ready-to-go 2-axis controller from a local guy who had built it years ago, and was converting the machine back to manual.

The setup works, although as I'm utterly new to such things- and have little electrical knowledge to fall back on- it was something of a struggle to get it connected, wired and running.

Currently, the lathe is almost fully functional, and has been for nearly a year now. It still needs plenty of little detail work, but at least the electricals, and mechanical axis drives are pretty much 100%.

The main drawback is, and has been, my near-total ignorance of Mach 3, and the fact that M3 does not play well with Fusion 360, at least as far as turning goes. I can draw something in F360, even something pretty simple, but I have not yet had any luck whatsoever at getting the resulting toolpath to work in M3.

I was hoping to have more time to play with it this winter, when work tends to slow down a bit and I'm less likely to have outdoor projects in the works.

BUT... a new development has come along: Centroid, a big-name professional-level manufacturer of CNC controllers, has brought out a "home shop" CNC controller called the Acorn. It has lots of features I'm looking forward to- like direct connection of my VFD into the controller (Mach 3 can do it, kind of, if you juggle a few things, write a macro and buy an aftermarket board) connect to a modern PC through an Ethernet connection (M3 requires a parallel port- who even has those anymore?) run high-accuracy quadrature encoders, and more.

The lathe-software version is due to launch tomorrow, and I plan to pick one up as soon as I can.

The idea here is that I'd like to disconnect my current, functioning controller system, basically everything from the old XP computer (the newest M3 will run on) all the way to the plugs on the steppers, all as one unit.

And that will be replaced by a complete Centroid setup- I'll also have to get a couple new stepper controllers, but I was thinking about doing that anyway. Get away from the older MicroKinetics boards I have (which work, and are still being manufactured) and move up to a more industry-standard Gecko controller.

And as such, I'd like to start from scratch, and build a new box. The current setup looks like this:



And with the cover, it looks like this:



The enclosure is steel, fairly heavy duty, about 14-16" square, and about 4" deep. The cover has "keyhole" screw slots- loosen the four screws, slide it up slightly, lift it clear. No hinges or other latches.

I'd like to find another one, or something very close to it. Interestingly enough, I saw one just like it at the local secondhand shop about a year ago, and thought about picking it up.

Anybody have a brand name, or a general style? I've been looking up "electrical enclosures" and similar keywords for a while, but I'm not seeing anything I'd like.

Suggestions or recommendations?

Doc.
You say you're having a lot of trouble getting toolpaths from fusion 360,and I can't help wondering, are you modeling the part in 3d in fusion, then trying to get it to export toolpaths? Or are you just starting with a 2d profile?

It strikes me that if you're starting with a 3d model, fusion might be putting in extraneous instructions, maybe even a whole other axis, when all you need is tool paths based of half of a profile of your part.

Though I will admit I'm not intimately familiar with any kind of CAM software that's more expensive than free-fiddy, I do wave a wrench at old cnc turning centers for a living.
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Joined: February 26th, 2015, 2:02 pm

October 11th, 2017, 12:54 pm #6

I see some on Zoro that look like that.

https://www.zoro.com/hoffman-enclosr-me ... 0UQAvD_BwE
Hoffman boxes work great for this kind of application, I've sold loads of them to my industrial milling and turning customers, and they ask for them by name.

If I was still on that side of the business, I would cut you a deal, but sadly, I moved into hydraulics about 2 years ago...
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Joined: September 12th, 2014, 4:00 am

October 11th, 2017, 5:43 pm #7

For anyone who's been following my Logan lathe CNC conversion, you might know that I picked up a mostly ready-to-go 2-axis controller from a local guy who had built it years ago, and was converting the machine back to manual.

The setup works, although as I'm utterly new to such things- and have little electrical knowledge to fall back on- it was something of a struggle to get it connected, wired and running.

Currently, the lathe is almost fully functional, and has been for nearly a year now. It still needs plenty of little detail work, but at least the electricals, and mechanical axis drives are pretty much 100%.

The main drawback is, and has been, my near-total ignorance of Mach 3, and the fact that M3 does not play well with Fusion 360, at least as far as turning goes. I can draw something in F360, even something pretty simple, but I have not yet had any luck whatsoever at getting the resulting toolpath to work in M3.

I was hoping to have more time to play with it this winter, when work tends to slow down a bit and I'm less likely to have outdoor projects in the works.

BUT... a new development has come along: Centroid, a big-name professional-level manufacturer of CNC controllers, has brought out a "home shop" CNC controller called the Acorn. It has lots of features I'm looking forward to- like direct connection of my VFD into the controller (Mach 3 can do it, kind of, if you juggle a few things, write a macro and buy an aftermarket board) connect to a modern PC through an Ethernet connection (M3 requires a parallel port- who even has those anymore?) run high-accuracy quadrature encoders, and more.

The lathe-software version is due to launch tomorrow, and I plan to pick one up as soon as I can.

The idea here is that I'd like to disconnect my current, functioning controller system, basically everything from the old XP computer (the newest M3 will run on) all the way to the plugs on the steppers, all as one unit.

And that will be replaced by a complete Centroid setup- I'll also have to get a couple new stepper controllers, but I was thinking about doing that anyway. Get away from the older MicroKinetics boards I have (which work, and are still being manufactured) and move up to a more industry-standard Gecko controller.

And as such, I'd like to start from scratch, and build a new box. The current setup looks like this:



And with the cover, it looks like this:



The enclosure is steel, fairly heavy duty, about 14-16" square, and about 4" deep. The cover has "keyhole" screw slots- loosen the four screws, slide it up slightly, lift it clear. No hinges or other latches.

I'd like to find another one, or something very close to it. Interestingly enough, I saw one just like it at the local secondhand shop about a year ago, and thought about picking it up.

Anybody have a brand name, or a general style? I've been looking up "electrical enclosures" and similar keywords for a while, but I'm not seeing anything I'd like.

Suggestions or recommendations?

Doc.
That's a standard electrical box. Any supply house will have a selection in various sizes. I've seen some of the smaller ones at Home Despot as well.

Although that's really not the best choice for an electronics enclosure. Machine tools generally use an oil-tight box to keep the crud out. Probably not a problem for your shop, but still something to consider.

As others have mentioned, try Digikey or Mouser for electronics enclosures. Or even eBay. The main problem with any of these suppliers is going to be the shipping to Alaska.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 12th, 2017, 1:23 am #8

You say you're having a lot of trouble getting toolpaths from fusion 360,and I can't help wondering, are you modeling the part in 3d in fusion, then trying to get it to export toolpaths? Or are you just starting with a 2d profile?

It strikes me that if you're starting with a 3d model, fusion might be putting in extraneous instructions, maybe even a whole other axis, when all you need is tool paths based of half of a profile of your part.

Though I will admit I'm not intimately familiar with any kind of CAM software that's more expensive than free-fiddy, I do wave a wrench at old cnc turning centers for a living.
I would draw the part in 360, then try and 'convert' it using the progam's own built-in CAM. Admittedly I haven't tried more than a handful of times, but it seems one of the biggest issues is that the CAM tends to default to industrial CNC lathes- that is, machines with turrets, and whose spindles tend to turn "backward" compared to my converted-conventional-engine-lathe.

And F360 is not nearly as focused on turning as it is on milling. Most of the tutorial videos show how to set up milling projects, very few (at least, as of about six months ago when I last checked) had anything to do with lathe turning. And most of the ones that did, focused on the Tormach with a turret, for which F360 has a dedicated setup.

As I said, things have almost certainly changed, I haven't had a chance to fool with it (either 360 or the lathe) pretty much all summer.

But for the moment, while there's a bunch of reasons I want to switch over to the new Acorn board, one of the biggest is to get the "conversational" programming, which, by all descriptions, will better suit a zero-experience doofus like me.

Doc.
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Joined: September 16th, 2014, 7:01 am

October 12th, 2017, 8:46 pm #9

For anyone who's been following my Logan lathe CNC conversion, you might know that I picked up a mostly ready-to-go 2-axis controller from a local guy who had built it years ago, and was converting the machine back to manual.

The setup works, although as I'm utterly new to such things- and have little electrical knowledge to fall back on- it was something of a struggle to get it connected, wired and running.

Currently, the lathe is almost fully functional, and has been for nearly a year now. It still needs plenty of little detail work, but at least the electricals, and mechanical axis drives are pretty much 100%.

The main drawback is, and has been, my near-total ignorance of Mach 3, and the fact that M3 does not play well with Fusion 360, at least as far as turning goes. I can draw something in F360, even something pretty simple, but I have not yet had any luck whatsoever at getting the resulting toolpath to work in M3.

I was hoping to have more time to play with it this winter, when work tends to slow down a bit and I'm less likely to have outdoor projects in the works.

BUT... a new development has come along: Centroid, a big-name professional-level manufacturer of CNC controllers, has brought out a "home shop" CNC controller called the Acorn. It has lots of features I'm looking forward to- like direct connection of my VFD into the controller (Mach 3 can do it, kind of, if you juggle a few things, write a macro and buy an aftermarket board) connect to a modern PC through an Ethernet connection (M3 requires a parallel port- who even has those anymore?) run high-accuracy quadrature encoders, and more.

The lathe-software version is due to launch tomorrow, and I plan to pick one up as soon as I can.

The idea here is that I'd like to disconnect my current, functioning controller system, basically everything from the old XP computer (the newest M3 will run on) all the way to the plugs on the steppers, all as one unit.

And that will be replaced by a complete Centroid setup- I'll also have to get a couple new stepper controllers, but I was thinking about doing that anyway. Get away from the older MicroKinetics boards I have (which work, and are still being manufactured) and move up to a more industry-standard Gecko controller.

And as such, I'd like to start from scratch, and build a new box. The current setup looks like this:



And with the cover, it looks like this:



The enclosure is steel, fairly heavy duty, about 14-16" square, and about 4" deep. The cover has "keyhole" screw slots- loosen the four screws, slide it up slightly, lift it clear. No hinges or other latches.

I'd like to find another one, or something very close to it. Interestingly enough, I saw one just like it at the local secondhand shop about a year ago, and thought about picking it up.

Anybody have a brand name, or a general style? I've been looking up "electrical enclosures" and similar keywords for a while, but I'm not seeing anything I'd like.

Suggestions or recommendations?

Doc.
Most Borg outposts have them, but you might want to spring for the Type 3R Raintight - they have a flange around the door to keep drips out and with some stick on foam gasket turns it to Darn Near Bombproof. Rainproof only has knockouts on the bottom, and certain models have no pre-punched holes, the rest (sides top front back) you have to drill or punch

They are in generic form from many makers - Circle AW, Hoffman, Wiegmann, etc - that keeps them cheap. Pick a size, 6X6, 8X8, 12X12, 16X16 and several rectangular sizes too 9X12, 12X18 And pick a depth (4" 6" 8" 10") to fit your VFD or devices you want inside in most formats If you want really long and skinny that's a Gutter - 4X4X24"

If you want a cooling fan like that be sure to put it on the bottom or put a shroud over the inlet to keep the larger chunks from being sucked in. And punch in a screened hole or two to let the hot air out
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Joined: September 12th, 2014, 8:40 pm

October 13th, 2017, 4:01 pm #10

For anyone who's been following my Logan lathe CNC conversion, you might know that I picked up a mostly ready-to-go 2-axis controller from a local guy who had built it years ago, and was converting the machine back to manual.

The setup works, although as I'm utterly new to such things- and have little electrical knowledge to fall back on- it was something of a struggle to get it connected, wired and running.

Currently, the lathe is almost fully functional, and has been for nearly a year now. It still needs plenty of little detail work, but at least the electricals, and mechanical axis drives are pretty much 100%.

The main drawback is, and has been, my near-total ignorance of Mach 3, and the fact that M3 does not play well with Fusion 360, at least as far as turning goes. I can draw something in F360, even something pretty simple, but I have not yet had any luck whatsoever at getting the resulting toolpath to work in M3.

I was hoping to have more time to play with it this winter, when work tends to slow down a bit and I'm less likely to have outdoor projects in the works.

BUT... a new development has come along: Centroid, a big-name professional-level manufacturer of CNC controllers, has brought out a "home shop" CNC controller called the Acorn. It has lots of features I'm looking forward to- like direct connection of my VFD into the controller (Mach 3 can do it, kind of, if you juggle a few things, write a macro and buy an aftermarket board) connect to a modern PC through an Ethernet connection (M3 requires a parallel port- who even has those anymore?) run high-accuracy quadrature encoders, and more.

The lathe-software version is due to launch tomorrow, and I plan to pick one up as soon as I can.

The idea here is that I'd like to disconnect my current, functioning controller system, basically everything from the old XP computer (the newest M3 will run on) all the way to the plugs on the steppers, all as one unit.

And that will be replaced by a complete Centroid setup- I'll also have to get a couple new stepper controllers, but I was thinking about doing that anyway. Get away from the older MicroKinetics boards I have (which work, and are still being manufactured) and move up to a more industry-standard Gecko controller.

And as such, I'd like to start from scratch, and build a new box. The current setup looks like this:



And with the cover, it looks like this:



The enclosure is steel, fairly heavy duty, about 14-16" square, and about 4" deep. The cover has "keyhole" screw slots- loosen the four screws, slide it up slightly, lift it clear. No hinges or other latches.

I'd like to find another one, or something very close to it. Interestingly enough, I saw one just like it at the local secondhand shop about a year ago, and thought about picking it up.

Anybody have a brand name, or a general style? I've been looking up "electrical enclosures" and similar keywords for a while, but I'm not seeing anything I'd like.

Suggestions or recommendations?

Doc.
It's a 12x12x4 junction boxhttps://store.solutionsdirectonline.com ... gIrlvD_BwE

Any local electrical supply house should have them in stock even Home Depot
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